fishing http://kalw.org en Navigating the Delta: Holding on to a Boating Economy and Culture http://kalw.org/post/navigating-delta-holding-boating-economy-and-culture <p>Water is the defining feature of the Delta, and recreation on the water is a big part of the economy and culture of this place. There are about<a href="http://www.delta.ca.gov/res/docs/ESP/ESP_P2_FINAL.pdf"> 8 million visits to the Delta</a> each year for activities like fishing, wind-surfing, water-skiing, and house-boating. The population just outside the Delta interior has grown significantly over the last 20 years, so it would make sense that the boating and fishing industries would have grown a lot, too. But they haven’t.</p><p> Thu, 27 Feb 2014 01:34:10 +0000 Lisa Morehouse 40272 at http://kalw.org Navigating the Delta: Holding on to a Boating Economy and Culture Human trafficking: A fisherman’s story http://kalw.org/post/human-trafficking-fisherman-s-story <p></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.15;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span style="font-size:19px;font-family:Arial;color:#000000;background-color:transparent;font-weight:normal;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;text-decoration:none;vertical-align:baseline;">San Francisco has some of the country’s highest reports of human trafficking. It’s one of the top 10 cities in the U.S</span><span style="font-size:19px;font-family:Arial;color:#000000;background-color:transparent;font-weight:normal;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;text-decoration:none;vertical-align:baseline;"> where trafficking is the worst. The practice is often called modern-day slavery: traffickers use sexual exploitation, fraud, and forced labor to keep people powerless. It’s the second most profitable crime in the world, generating more than $32 billion a year -- just behind drug trafficking. </span></p><p> Thu, 16 Jan 2014 02:05:20 +0000 Leila Day 38442 at http://kalw.org Human trafficking: A fisherman’s story Fishermen harvest dinner in the bay – at their own risk http://kalw.org/post/fishermen-harvest-dinner-bay-their-own-risk <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">It’s crab season in California, and commercial fishermen can’t unload their catches fast enough to satisfy the crowds filling Fisherman’s Wharf. But out on the public piers behind the </span>Embarcadero<span style="line-height: 1.5;">, away from the big boats, you’ll find a different breed of fisherman. They set out their poles, unroll their lines, add some bait, and wait quietly for dinner to arrive.</span></p><p> Mon, 19 Aug 2013 23:57:59 +0000 Julia Scott 8249 at http://kalw.org Fishermen harvest dinner in the bay – at their own risk