Native Americans http://kalw.org en Your Call: What are the connections between cultural diversity and biological diversity? http://kalw.org/post/your-call-what-are-connections-between-cultural-diversity-and-biological-diversity <p></p><p></p><p>On the July 29th, 2014&nbsp;edition of &nbsp;Your Call, we’ll have a conversation Mark Dowie, investigative journalist and author of Conservation Refugees: The Hundred-Year Conflict between Global Conservation and Native Peoples. He writes that about half of world’s protected conservation areas were occupied or used by indigenous peoples, but they were displaced in the interests of conservation, so what is the history of the US national parks and Native Peoples? Join the conversation, with Rose Aguilar, and you.</p><p><strong style="line-height: 1.5;">Guests:</strong></p> Tue, 29 Jul 2014 06:41:56 +0000 Malihe Razazan 47225 at http://kalw.org Your Call: What are the connections between cultural diversity and biological diversity? Swimming from Alcatraz to heal body and soul http://kalw.org/post/swimming-alcatraz-heal-body-and-soul <p class="p1">The sun is just beginning to rise over the glassy water at San Francisco’s aquatic park. Karen Wapato is beaming as she emerges from the Bay and peels off her goggles.</p><p class="p1">“It was better than yesterday,” she says. “I keep on just telling myself, stay calm don’t panic, keep breathing, try to keep my stroke real smooth as smooth as I can,” she says as she catches her breath.</p><p class="p1">Wapato has never swum in the ocean before, and it’s her second day swimming in the San Francisco Bay.&nbsp;</p> Tue, 12 Nov 2013 22:26:43 +0000 Angela Johnston 35796 at http://kalw.org Swimming from Alcatraz to heal body and soul Revisiting Richmond's boxcar village http://kalw.org/post/revisiting-richmonds-boxcar-village <p><em>Some of the first people in the Bay Area were Native Americans &ndash; members of the Ohlone tribe, who settled around what is now the city of Richmond. Beginning in the 1920s, another group of Native people found their way to the Bay Area. They were migrants from the Acoma and Laguna tribes of the Southwest. When they arrived, they took up an unusual living arrangement: in boxcars, parked on the dead ends of the city&rsquo;s railroad tracks.</em></p> Tue, 28 Feb 2012 22:45:57 +0000 Holly Kernan 6632 at http://kalw.org Revisiting Richmond's boxcar village