3:39am

Sat June 1, 2013
Environment

New Maps Aim To Raise Awareness Of Storm Surge Danger

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 9:39 am

Streets flooded in the Staten Island borough of New York after Superstorm Sandy hit in October. The storm caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses.
John Minchillo AP

Hurricane season begins Saturday, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is forecasting an active season, with perhaps seven to 11 hurricanes.

With memories of last year's destruction from Hurricane Sandy still fresh, meteorologists are working on ways to improve how they forecast storms and communicate warnings to the public.

When Sandy was making its way northward in the Atlantic and began to turn toward the East Coast, the National Hurricane Center tried to emphasize the danger that storm surge posed for residents, especially those near New York City.

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2:30am

Sat June 1, 2013
Parallels

After Years Of War, Ugandan Children Face New Deadly Threat

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 5:27 am

Grace Aber stands in the shade of a mango tree with her children in the remote village of Tumangu in northern Uganda. Four of Aber's nine children have been diagnosed with nodding syndrome, starting with Partick (front), who first showed symptoms in 2002.
Matthew Kielty for NPR

The village of Tumangu, in northern Uganda, defines remote. It's hard even to find on maps. But it shows up frequently in news stories. Grace Aber is about to show me why.

She leads me down a narrow dirt path, passing a couple of clay huts. We get to a big mango tree. Aber's 17-year-old son, Patrick, sits under it. His shoulders are slouched. His eyes look like glass.

Aber tries to get him to say his name. A small grunt is the only sound he makes.

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2:29am

Sat June 1, 2013
Simon Says

High School Newspapers: An Endangered Species

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 11:49 am

Student newspapers may be the latest victims of social media.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Does your local high school have a student newspaper? And in this day when a social media message saying, "Tonight's Green Design and Technology class homework sucks!" can instantly be sent to thousands, does it need to?

The New York Times reports this week that only 1 in 8 of New York's public high schools has a student newspaper — and many of those are published just a few times a year. A few more are online, which can leave out poorer schools.

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2:29am

Sat June 1, 2013
The Picture Show

Documenting America's Environments: Then And Now

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 11:26 am

East Boston, Mass., in 1973 (left) and in 2012.
Michael P. Manheim Environmental Protection Agency

In 1971, when the Environmental Protection Agency was in its early days, someone at the agency got the idea to send nearly 100 freelance photographers around America to document the country. These weren't postcard shots, but pictures of street corners, freight yards, parking lots, alleyways — wherever people were working and living. It was called Documerica, and it went on for seven years.

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2:23am

Sat June 1, 2013
It's All Politics

Obama's Economic View: A Glass Half-Full And Half-Empty

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 3:39 am

President Obama speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House on Friday. He said the economy is seeing progress but added that too many people are still struggling.
Win McNamee Getty Images

It has been a good week for economic news. Here's a quick rundown of the positive signs: Home prices showed their best gains in seven years. Consumer confidence hit a five-year high. The stock market set a new record. All just this week.

"We're seeing progress," President Obama said in the White House Rose Garden on Friday morning, "and the economy is starting to pick up steam. The gears are starting to turn again, and we're getting some traction."

You could tell from the tone of his voice that he was leading up to a "but."

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2:21am

Sat June 1, 2013
The Salt

France Sells Presidential Wines To Update Palace Wine Cellar

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 12:46 pm

French President Francois Hollande's palace has decided to dive into its wine cellar and sell some of its treasures to raise money and replenish its collection with more modest vintages. About 1,200 bottles, a 10th of the Elysee's wine collection, are being sold at the Drouot auction house in Paris this week.
Jacques Brinon AP

Prized Burgundies and Bordeaux once served at the presidential palace in France were sold for the first time ever as the wine cellar at Elysee Palace gets an overhaul.

Some 1,200 bottles, or 10 percent of the palace wines, went on sale this week at the famous Drouot auction house in downtown Paris. On the block were vintages from 1930 to 1990, including famous names such as Chateau Latour, Chateau Mouton Rothschild and Montrachet.

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11:03pm

Fri May 31, 2013
Music Interviews

City And Colour: A Musician Unplugs To Make A Connection

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 12:21 pm

Dallas Green, once a member of the post-hardcore group Alexisonfire, now makes much quieter music as City and Colour. His fourth solo album is The Hurry and the Harm.
Dustin Rabin Courtesy of the artist

City and Colour is the stage name of Canadian singer-songwriter Dallas Green. Once upon a time, he was a member of the post-hardcore band Alexisonfire, which self-identified as "the sound of two Catholic high-school girls in mid-knife fight." But Green had a different side to him, too.

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9:08pm

Fri May 31, 2013
Folk Music & Beyond this Sat. 3 pm

San Francisco Free Folk Festival this weekend!

Whiskey And Women

The San Francisco Free Folk Festival is happening this weekend, 12 noon to 10 pm both days at Presidio Middle School, 450 30th Ave. at Geary.  Lots going on--five stages of live music, jam sessions, film screenings, family activities, and workshops on vocal, dance, and instrument instruction.  For the complete schedule, visit http://www.sffolkfest.org

3:34pm

Fri May 31, 2013
The Two-Way

Firefighters Killed In Houston Motel Blaze

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 3:53 pm

Four firefighters have been killed battling a five-alarm fire at a Houston motel. At least five others have been injured.

The Houston mayor's office confirmed the dead and injured after firefighters responded to the massive blaze at the Southwest Inn shortly after noon. The fire reportedly began at a restaurant and then "flames spread to the motel and were shooting from the roof before firefighters extinguished the blaze," The Associated Press reports.

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3:07pm

Fri May 31, 2013
Politics

Cannabis News Roundup: May 31, 2013

Cannabis leaf
Portable Network Graphics

Amminano bill reconsidered today… First national brand of dispensaries proposed… Doctors recommend cannabis... Whole Foods celebrates Hemp Week... and more!

LEGISLATION

News & Review // A federal judge says the Justice Dept. is focusing on California’s dispensaries while seeming to ignore the situations in Washington and Colorado because the laws in those states are better written....

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