4:42pm

Mon February 18, 2013
Weekly digest

Coming up this week on Your Call!!

 

What's ahead this week on Your Call?  Check out our upcoming show topics...  If you have ideas about people we should be talking to, questions we should be asking, resources we should know about -- drop us a line at feedback@yourcallradio.org or post a comment right here!  

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4:41pm

Mon February 18, 2013
Politics

Youth Radio: Young people still plugged into politics on social media

In the State of the Union address on Tuesday evening, President Obama touched on several issues that might have pricked the ears of his young supporters who were instrumental in getting him re-elected.

According to CIRCLE, young black and Hispanic women provided the strongest support for President Obama among young voters in 2012. Young black male voters also heavily supported the president, although more of them voted Republican than in 2008.

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2:20pm

Mon February 18, 2013
The Two-Way

Israel's 'Prisoner X' May Have Passed State Secrets

Originally published on Sun February 24, 2013 5:49 am

The story of "Prisoner X" is dominating the media in both Australia and Israel.
William West AFP/Getty Images

Last week we told you about "Prisoner X," the mysterious Israeli-Australian citizen who worked for Israel's spy agency Mossad. Australian media broke the story of how the man identified as Ben Zygier languished for months in an Israeli prison until he was found dead of an apparent suicide. Now we have new details on the case.

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1:47pm

Mon February 18, 2013
The Two-Way

Chinese Students Wore Uniforms With Cancer-Causing Dyes

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 4:45 pm

Students in 21 schools in the Chinese city of Shanghai have been ordered to stop wearing uniforms that were found to contain a dye that causes cancer.

NPR's Frank Langfitt is reporting on the story for our Newscast unit. Here's his report:

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1:39pm

Mon February 18, 2013
U.S.

What Happens When Someone Else Gets Your Tax Refund

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 3:27 pm

Todd Macy, a banker from Marin County, Calif., was the victim of identity theft. Nearly a year after filing his return, he's still waiting for his federal tax refund.
Courtesy of Todd Macy

If you usually wait until April to file your taxes, you might want to hurry up — before identity thieves beat you to it. Using stolen names and Social Security numbers, these criminals file fake tax returns with false wage and withholding information. This generates big — and fraudulent — refunds, before the real taxpayer gets around to filing.

The Internal Revenue Service says it's busy working to combat what prosecutors call a fraud epidemic.

Most taxpayers don't have any idea something is wrong until they hit the send button on their taxes and get an error message.

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1:39pm

Mon February 18, 2013
It's All Politics

How New Jersey's High-Flying Sen. Menendez Ran Into Turbulence

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 2:12 pm

Sen. Robert Menendez of New Jersey, shown in June, has come under scrutiny before, but has never been charged.
Mike Coppola Getty Images

These should be good times for Democratic Sen. Robert Menendez.

New Jersey voters re-elected him last fall in a landslide, and he became chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee a few weeks ago. But along the way, Menendez has come under scrutiny by the Senate Ethics Committee and perhaps other government investigators — and certainly the media — for his connections to a longtime friend and generous campaign donor.

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1:39pm

Mon February 18, 2013
Middle East

Newly Displaced Syrians Head For Turkish Border

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 6:01 pm

Syrian people wait at a customs gate at the Turkey-Syria border near Reyhanli, Turkey, last week. Hundreds of thousands of people are fleeing central Syria, heading to southern Turkey.
Gaia Anderson AP

A new surge of Syrian refugees is swamping humanitarian aid agencies in southern Turkey, where official refugee camps are full.

But the newcomers may be just the tip of the iceberg. In central Syria, civilians under attack by combat jets, tanks and artillery have fled towns and villages north of the city of Hama, and thousands are on the move.

"What they do now, they burn everything ahead of them. They bomb this area with everything they've got," says Hossan Hamadah, a Syrian-American from Texas.

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1:19pm

Mon February 18, 2013
The Two-Way

Sen. Mike Johanns Says He Won't Seek Re-Election

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 4:39 pm

Mike Johanns, the Republican senator from Nebraska, announced Monday that he won't seek another term in the Senate.

Here's more from the Omaha World-Herald:

"Johanns said it was time to 'close this chapter' in his life. He noted that he and his wife, Stephanie, have spent 32 years in public life and that they want to spend more time with family.

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11:58am

Mon February 18, 2013
Europe

Greece's Economic Crisis Reveals Fault Lines In The Media

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 4:05 pm

People read newspaper headlines in Athens. In 2009, there were 39 national dailies, 23 national Sunday papers, 14 national weekly papers and dozens of TV and radio stations for a population of 11 million.
Louisa Gouliamaki AFP/Getty Images

Three years of spiraling economic crisis in Greece have devastated every sector of the economy. The Greek media are among the hardest hit. Many newspapers and TV outlets have closed or are on the verge, and some 4,000 journalists have lost their jobs.

Many people believe the country's news media have failed to cover the crisis — and lost credibility along the way. And many Greek journalists acknowledge that a massive conflict of interest sooner or later had to explode.

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