2:51am

Sat May 4, 2013
U.S.

At NRA Convention, Dueling Narratives Displayed With Guns

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 9:50 am

An ammunition display at the NRA's annual convention in Houston on Friday.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

The National Rifle Association is holding its annual convention in Houston this weekend. More than 70,000 people are expected to attend for speeches and demos and acres of guns, ammo and camo.

The NRA is coming off of a major victory: the defeat of gun control legislation in the Senate. While the talk in the convention hall is about keeping up the fight and staying true to the Constitution, a small protest against gun violence is being held outside.

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2:03am

Sat May 4, 2013
A Blog Supreme

At Jazz Fest, Photographers Have A Culture All Their Own

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 8:53 am

Little Freddie King at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, 2013, photographed by Skip Bolen.
Courtesy of Skip Bolen

The 2013 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival wraps up Monday. This weekend and last, 12 stages have mixed such marquee names as Fleetwood Mac, Phoenix and Los Lobos with dozens of local bluesmen, soul belters and Cajun fiddle players.

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11:43pm

Fri May 3, 2013
The Two-Way

Israel Reportedly Attacked Syrian Target In Airstrike

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 6:19 am

Israel has conducted an airstrike against a target in Syria, in an apparent attempt to keep a shipment of missiles from reaching Hezbollah, according to multiple news agencies citing Israeli and U.S. officials.

Israel has not officially confirmed reports that it carried out the attack on a target in Syria, as The Associated Press reports. But the news agency says anonymous Israeli officials have said the attack took place in the early hours of Friday.

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11:03pm

Fri May 3, 2013
Author Interviews

Burt Bacharach: 'Never Be Afraid Of Something That You Can Whistle'

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 7:25 am

Burt Bacharach has just released a memoir, Anyone Who Had a Heart.
Olaf Heine HarperCollins

Burt Bacharach has written huge hit songs, each recognizable after just a couple of notes: "Alfie," "What the World Needs Now," "That's What Friends Are For" — the list goes on. He's written 73 Top 40 hits, along with musical comedies and other collaborations. He's won Oscars and the Gershwin Prize. His songs are often poised on the edge between poignancy and joy, or sometimes the reverse.

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2:49pm

Fri May 3, 2013
The Two-Way

Huge Solar Plane Begins Slow Flight Across The U.S.

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 3:43 am

Pilot Bertrand Piccard takes off in the Solar Impulse solar electric airplane at Moffett Field in Mountain View, California, on Friday.
Beck Diefenbach Getty Images

The Solar Impulse, a solar-powered airplane with the 208-foot wing-span, has begun a slow journey across the United States.

We've told you about the Swiss plane before. A year ago, the plane took 20 hours to fly from Switzerland to Spain and then flew to Morocco completing its first transcontinental flight.

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1:55pm

Fri May 3, 2013
The Two-Way

Dow Hits 15,000 For The First Time; Closes Just Shy Of The Mark

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange after the morning bell on May 1.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

The stock market continues its winning streak: The Dow Jones hit another milestone today, tapping 15,000 for the first time, but closing just shy of the milestone.

This, of course, follows good news about the job market released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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1:55pm

Fri May 3, 2013
The Salt

Unraveling The Mystery Of A Rice Revolution

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 2:02 pm

Rice farmers in Indonesia plant rice seedlings using the "system of rice intensification."
Courtesy of SRI International Network and Resources Center

It's a captivating story: A global rice-growing revolution that started with a Jesuit priest in Madagascar, far from any recognized center of agricultural innovation. Every so often, it surfaces in the popular media — most recently in The Guardian, which earlier this year described farmers in one corner of India hauling in gigantic rice harvests without resorting to pesticides or genetic modification.

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1:49pm

Fri May 3, 2013
Code Switch

Bollywood's Early Roots In A Silent Film

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 7:35 am

Dhundiraj Govind Phalke (left), known as the father of Indian cinema, examines a filmstrip.
The Kobal Collection

Film festivals around the world are celebrating the 100th anniversary of Indian films this year.

Bollywood today is well known for its over-the-top song-and-dance numbers. (Case in point: In the 1998 Hindi film Dil Se, a troupe of dancers gyrate in unison to a love song on top of a moving train.)

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1:49pm

Fri May 3, 2013
Code Switch

A Black Jockey At The Kentucky Derby, Once Again

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 3:41 am

Kevin Krigger rides Goldencents during a six-furlong workout at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, Calif., in January.
Benoit Photo AP

The Kentucky Derby's 139th running is this weekend, and it will feature a sight that's been a rarity in the race for much of the past century — an African-American jockey.

"Everything that comes with the Derby right now for me is not the same as the majority of the other riders, or any other riders, because I'm the only African-American rider in the race," Kevin Krigger says.

Krigger was born in the U.S. Virgin Islands, but he's been racing in California. He's the first African-American jockey to ride in the Derby in more than a decade.

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1:49pm

Fri May 3, 2013
NPR News Investigations

Justice In The Segregated South: A New Look At An Old Killing

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 3:41 am

When John Queen died in August 1965 in front of the Ice House (the building between the Standard Oil station and The Dollar Store), rules of racial inferiority were so entrenched in Fayette, Miss., that black residents felt they couldn't complain. But just four months later things changed and black residents marched on Dec. 24 as part of their boycott against white-owned businesses.
Jack Thornell AP

This story contains language that some may find offensive.

In the segregated South in 1965, John Queen was about as insignificant as a man could be. He was black, elderly and paralyzed. His legs had been crushed when as a boy he fell off a roof. For the rest of his life, he pulled himself around with his hands.

In Fayette, Miss., he would shine shoes on Main Street for a few coins. People called him "Crippled Johnny" or "Shoe-Shine Johnny."

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