3:00pm

Mon February 4, 2013
Business

How One Company Reinvented The Hand Dryer

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 1:52 pm

Craig McCarl dips Xlerator covers two at a time into a chrome bath. He has worked for Excel Dryer in East Longmeadow, Mass., for 31 years.
Andrea Hsu NPR

There's a lot of talk in politics about the desirability of American manufacturing and "green" jobs. President Obama talks about both often, especially wind turbines and long-lasting batteries that are made on U.S. soil.

Robert Siegel, host of All Things Considered, recently visited a Massachusetts factory that makes a product that hits those same parameters. It's arguably a force for sustainability, nearly 40 Americans assemble it, and it's an interesting case study in innovation: the high-speed hand dryer.

'We Had A Product People Hated To Use'

Read more

2:39pm

Mon February 4, 2013
The Two-Way

Alabama Hostage Standoff Ends; Kidnapped Child Is Safe

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 4:09 am

Posters for Ethan decorate power poles all over town, like this one outside the elementary school in Midland City, Ala.
Butch Dill AP

Nearly a week after it began, the standoff in Midland City, Ala., where a 5-year-old-boy has been held captive in an underground bunker, has come to an end.

Citing a U.S. official, CBS News reports the "kidnapped child is alive [and the] kidnapper is dead."

CNN reports that an "explosion" was followed by "gun shots" shortly before the standoff came to an end.

State Rep. Steve Clouse said the boy is at a hospital seven or eight miles away from Midland City and he is "relatively healthy."

Read more

2:32pm

Mon February 4, 2013
Shots - Health News

Aging Poorly: Another Act Of Baby Boomer Rebellion

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 7:40 am

Health researchers say the proportion of people in their late 40s to 60s with diabetes, hypertension or obesity has increased over the past two decades.
iStockphoto.com

Baby boomers have a reputation for being addicted to exercise and obsessed with eating well.

But that story didn't jibe with what physician Dana E. King and his colleagues see walking through the door of their family practice every day in Morgantown, W.Va.

Read more

2:31pm

Mon February 4, 2013
The Two-Way

How Do Israeli And Palestinian Textbooks Treat The Other Side?

Originally published on Sun February 10, 2013 5:48 am

Palestinian students attend a class in the West Bank city of Ramallah on Sunday.
Majdi Mohammed AP

There was some good news and bad news in a three-year study that tried to take an objective look at bias in Israeli and Palestinian textbooks directed against "the other."

Read more

1:09pm

Mon February 4, 2013
The Two-Way

Pentagon Will Brief Congress On Deadly Sept. 14 Camp Bastion Attack

More than four months after a deadly attack at a sprawling allied base in Afghanistan that killed two U.S. Marines, there are lingering questions about how it happened.

Read more

12:34pm

Mon February 4, 2013
The Salt

Sandwich Monday: Grilled Cheese With Mac N' Cheese

The Mac.
NPR

We live in an age of great marriages: William and Kate, Kim and Kanye (oh, wait, she's still married to this guy), Kim and The Next One. Best of all, though, is "The Mac" from Cheesie's, in Chicago. The sandwich weds a classic Grilled Cheese with Mac N' Cheese, in one easy to absorb package.

Ian: I honestly feel like we're five years away from never again having to use the word "or" in America.

Read more

12:19pm

Mon February 4, 2013
The Two-Way

Report: W.Va. Fails To Enforce New Regs Designed To Prevent Mine Explosions

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 5:53 am

Ken Ward at The Charleston Gazette has a story worth reading about West Virginia's failure to enforce new coal mine dust standards prompted by the deadly explosion three years ago at Massey Energy's Upper Big Branch mine.

Ward used the state's Freedom of Information Act to obtain and review mine safety inspections conducted by the Office of Miners' Health, Safety and Training.

Read more

12:03pm

Mon February 4, 2013
Middle East

Iran's Leader Embraces Facebook; Fellow Iranians Are Blocked

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 7:29 am

Iranian authorities are using cyberpolice units to crack down on people who try to access banned websites, including social media sites such as Facebook. Here, Iranians use computers at an Internet cafe in Tehran in January.
Vahid Salemi AP

When Iran's supreme leader got a Facebook page in December, Iranians sat up and blinked.

Some thought it was a fake, finding it hard to believe that Ayatollah Ali Khamenei would be using a technology that his own government blocks. A U.S. State Department spokeswoman skeptically wondered how many "likes" it would attract.

But some of Khamenei's supporters quickly rallied behind the move, which first came to light in a reference on — you guessed it — the ayatollah's Twitter account.

Read more

12:02pm

Mon February 4, 2013
The Two-Way

Royal Recovery: Remains ID'd As Those Of King Richard III

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 3:10 pm

An enlarged image of the skull identified as that of King Richard III. Jo Appleby, a lecturer in human bioarchaeology at the University of Leicester, is pointing to a detail.
Rui Vieira PA Photos /Landov

Remains found under what's now a parking lot in the English city of Leicester have been confirmed to be those of King Richard III, researchers at the University of Leicester announced Monday.

Read more

11:58am

Mon February 4, 2013
It's All Politics

Romney 2013? Tagg Weighs Massachusetts Senate Bid

Republican Tagg Romney reportedly is considering a bid for the U.S. Senate from Massachusetts in the June 25 special election.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

The Boston Herald caused a bit of a stir Monday, reporting that Mitt Romney's eldest son, Tagg, is considering a bid for the Massachusetts Senate seat long held by new Secretary of State John Kerry.

Read more

Pages