1:22pm

Fri May 10, 2013
It's All Politics

Benghazi Schools Obama In The Politics Of Scandal

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 1:45 pm

A burned vehicle outside the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after the Sept. 11, 2012, attack.
Esam Omran Al-Fetori Reuters/Landov

President Obama has led an administration that so far has avoided a headline-grabbing, signature scandal. But now he's learning how one begins to take shape.

In many ways, the Benghazi story is following the arc of many Washington scandals of the past. It's rarely the initial incident that gets politicians in trouble. Instead, it's the way in which they respond to it.

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12:52pm

Fri May 10, 2013
Transportation

Bay Bridge bolt fix could cost $10 million, opening date still unclear

The new eastern span of the Bay Bridge (via flickr user tofuart)

California officials say they have a plan to stabilize bolts that failed earlier this year on the eastern span of the Bay Bridge.

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12:24pm

Fri May 10, 2013
Shots - Health News

Judge Denies Administration's Request To Delay Plan-B Ruling

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 4:36 am

U.S. District Judge Korman of New York is steamed about the administration's handling of the Plan B One-Step morning-after pill.
AP

The U.S. District Court judge who last month ordered the Food and Drug Administration to make the most popular forms of the emergency contraceptive pill available over-the-counter with no age restrictions has denied the government's request to stay his ruling while it's on appeal.

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12:17pm

Fri May 10, 2013
Environment

Atop A Hawaiian Mountain, A Constant Sniff For Carbon Dioxide

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 10:22 am

Researchers use the 120-foot tower atop Mauna Loa in Hawaii to collect air samples and measure the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Mauna Kea looms in the distance.
Forrest M. Mims III forrestmims.org

Climate scientists have a good reason to want to get away from it all. To get an accurate picture of the amount of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere, you have to find places where the numbers won't be distorted by cities or factories or even lots of vegetation that can have a major local impact on CO2 concentrations.

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11:41am

Fri May 10, 2013
The Two-Way

Boston Bombing Suspect Buried In Secret At Virginia Cemetery

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 12:07 pm

Bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, in a surveillance image taken shortly before the blasts that struck the Boston Marathon last month.
Bob Leonard Associated Press

Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev has been interred at a Muslim cemetery in central Virginia after a two-week ordeal in which a Massachusetts funeral director sought in vain to find a burial location.

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10:30am

Fri May 10, 2013
Radio Diaries

Teenage Diaries Revisited: Mother And Son Listen To The Past

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 7:18 am

In the late 1990s, Melissa Rodriguez struggled to create a stable life at home for her son, who is now a teenager. Together, they've faced many challenges.
Radio Diaries (left), David Gilkey/NPR

Name: Melissa Rodriguez

Hometown: New Haven, Conn.

Current city: Orange, N.J.

Occupation: Customer service representative

Then:

"I just started my life. I just started to go to school, I just started working, and I just didn't have anything settled yet."

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10:18am

Fri May 10, 2013
The Two-Way

Will Imran Khan Shake Up Pakistani Politics This Time?

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 11:38 am

A supporter greets Imran Khan at a campaign rally on May 6, in Multan, Pakistan. Pakistan's parliamentary elections will be held on Saturday, and Khan's party is hoping the large, enthusiastic crowds at rallies will translate into a strong showing at the polls.
Daniel Berehulak Getty Images

After retiring as Pakistan's most celebrated cricket player, Imran Khan has dabbled on the margins of Pakistani politics for nearly two decades, trying to make a mark.

The sportsman turned philanthropist who led a playboy lifestyle in his younger days has attracted endless media attention, but until now neither he nor his movement has had any real impact.

As Pakistanis vote in a crucial parliamentary election on Saturday, could this time be different?

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10:11am

Fri May 10, 2013
Environment

'Dangerous Territory': Carbon Dioxide Levels Reach Iconic High

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 4:26 pm

Carbon dioxide readings at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii have reached what atmospheric scientist Ralph Keeling calls a "psychological threshold" of 400 parts per million. The amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has been steadily increasing since near-constant measurements began at the observatory in 1958.
Jonathan Kingston National Geographic/Getty Images

Earth's atmosphere is entering a new era. A mountaintop research station that has been tracking carbon dioxide for more than 50 years says the level of that gas in our air has reached a milestone: 400 parts per million.

That number is one of the clearest measures of how human beings are changing the planet. It shows how much carbon we have put into the air from burning fossil fuels — and that carbon dioxide drives global warming.

This measurement comes from Mauna Loa, Hawaii, a remote volcano where the air is largely free of local influences.

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10:09am

Fri May 10, 2013
The Two-Way

Malcolm X's Grandson Reportedly Killed In Mexico

Malcolm Shabazz, pictured in this 2006 photo posted on his blog, is said to have died Thursday at age 28.
Malcolm Shabazz

Malcolm Shabazz, the grandson of slain civil rights leader Malcolm X, has reportedly died at age 28. A family friend says Shabazz was killed Thursday in Mexico.

The news first appeared in New York's The Amsterdam News, after family friend Terrie Williams tweeted, "I'm confirming, per the U.S. Embassy, on behalf of the family, the tragic death of Malcolm Shabazz, grandson of Malcolm X."

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9:54am

Fri May 10, 2013
Shots - Health News

Kids With Autism Quick To Detect Motion

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 4:37 am

Did you see that?
iStockphoto.com

Children with autism see simple movements twice as fast as other children their age, a new study finds.

Researchers at Vanderbilt University and the University of Rochester were looking to test a common theory about autism which holds that overwhelming sensory stimulation inhibits other brain functions. The researchers figured they could check that by studying how kids with autism process moving images.

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