12:20pm

Tue May 14, 2013
Africa

The Enemy Inside: Rhino's Protectors Sometimes Aid Poachers

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 5:19 pm

Mike Watson (left), CEO of Kenya's Lewa Conservancy, and conservationist Ian Craig identify the carcass of a 4-year-old black rhino named Arthur, whom poachers had killed the night before. The well-armed, well-informed poachers very likely used night vision goggles and a silencer on an AK-47.
Gregory Warner NPR

It says a lot about the state of the war against poachers in Africa that the Lewa Conservancy, a private sanctuary in Kenya with 12 percent of the country's rhinos, recently appointed a CEO who has never studied zoology or biology. Instead, Mike Watson is an ex-captain in the British army.

His training has already come in handy. Take, for instance, a visit to a crime scene earlier this year: a rhino carcass splayed out in the mud.

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12:17pm

Tue May 14, 2013
Environment

With Rising Seas, America's Birthplace Could Disappear

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 4:15 pm

Colonists built the original glass-blowing kiln in Jamestown, Va., at this beach for easy access to the sand. Now the site is just inches above the water level.
John W. Poole NPR

By the end of the century, the birthplace of America may be underwater.

The first successful English colony in America was at Jamestown, Va., a swampy island in the Chesapeake Bay. The colony endured for almost a century, and remnants of the place still exist. You can go there and see the ruins. You can walk where Capt. John Smith and Pocahontas walked. But Jamestown is now threatened by rising sea levels that scientists say could submerge the island by century's end.

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12:16pm

Tue May 14, 2013
Shots - Health News

Feds Push For Lower Alcohol Thresholds For Drivers

Originally published on Wed May 15, 2013 10:07 am

A car driven by a 19-year-old man crashed into a tree in Bates Township, Mich., in April. The Iron County Sheriff's Department said investigators believed the driver, who survived the crash, was drunk and speeding.
AP

To curb drunken driving, the federal National Transportation Safety Board has voted to recommend that states tighten the legal limit for drivers' blood alcohol.

The threshold now for drunken driving is a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08. (The BAC equals alcohol divided by the volume of blood it's in.)

The NTSB would push for it to be lowered to 0.05, in line with the limits in countries such as Denmark, the Philippines and Switzerland.

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11:19am

Tue May 14, 2013
The Two-Way

Justice Department To Open Probe Of IRS's Actions

Originally published on Wed May 15, 2013 5:17 am

Attorney Gen. Eric Holder has ordered the Justice Department to open an investigation into whether any laws were broken when the Internal Revenue Service singled out some conservative groups for extra scrutiny, he told reporters Tuesday.

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11:14am

Tue May 14, 2013
The Salt

Chris Hadfield: Space Chef In Chief

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 2:49 pm

Cmdr. Chris Hadfield demonstrates how to make a sandwich, space station-style.
Screenshot from YouTube

Amid the media phenomenon that is Cmdr. Chris Hadfield, you may have overlooked his turn as the International Space Station's top chef.

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11:09am

Tue May 14, 2013
The Two-Way

It's True: 'Mistakes Were Made' Is The King Of Non-Apologies

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 12:01 pm

President Ulysses S. Grant gets the credit — or blame? — for helping make "mistakes were made" a phrase that politicians can't seem to avoid using.
Spencer Arnold Getty Images

Make no mistake, the acting commissioner of the IRS put himself in historic company Tuesday by writing in USA Today that "mistakes were made" when his agency singled out for extra scrut

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10:23am

Tue May 14, 2013
City Visions: May 20, 2013

How to Reduce the Carbon Footprint of Pets

The amount of dog waste generated in North America each day is the equivalent to the size of 153 blue whales, or 55,845 blue whales a year, according to the recent Canadian film "Dog Dazed."  On the next City Visions, host Joseph Pace will examine the innovative uses of this dog waste, the critically important but lesser known reasons to keep cats indoors, the perils of pet obesity and more.  What do you need to do be a more environmentally aware pet owner?  

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10:22am

Tue May 14, 2013
Movie Interviews

Gerwig, Baumbach Poke At Post-College Pangs

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 11:33 am

Director Noah Baumbach has made a name for himself with films such as The Squid and the Whale and Margot at the Wedding.
Wilson Webb IFC Films

In the film Frances Ha, Greta Gerwig stars as the title character, a 27-year-old living a good but not particularly successful post-college life in New York City.

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10:17am

Tue May 14, 2013
Parallels

American Doctors Reach Out To Syria

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 11:34 am

Dr. Zaher Sahloul, a Syrian-American physician in Chicago, heads a group of U.S. doctors providing help to those injured in Syria's civil war.
Amy Ta NPR

The civil war in Syria feels far away for many Americans. But it hits close to home for one Chicago doctor and has pulled him, and many of his colleagues, to the front lines.

Tell Me More host Michel Martin spoke with Dr. Zaher Sahloul, a practicing critical care specialist in Chicago and president of the Syrian American Medical Society.

Sahloul says that for safety reasons, local physicians in Syria have established an underground health care system.

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10:17am

Tue May 14, 2013
Intelligence Squared U.S.

Debate: Is The FDA's Caution Hazardous To Our Health?

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 11:34 am

Scott Gottlieb and Peter Huber argue in favor of the motion "The FDA's Caution Is Hazardous to Our Health."
Samuel LaHoz Intelligence Squared U.S.
  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
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When it comes to approving new medical treatments, the Food and Drug Administration is balancing the need for patient safety against the urgency of making important new treatments available as quickly as possible.

Some argue the FDA sets the bar too high, requiring a process that takes too much time and money to carry out. They say that can leave patients waiting longer than necessary for promising treatments or lead to drugs not being developed at all.

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