2:34am

Tue April 23, 2013
Explosions At Boston Marathon

Deciphering Foreign Versus Domestic Terrorism

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 3:53 am

Steve Inskeep talks with Karen Greenberg, Director of Fordham University's Center on National Security, about defining terrorism, what it means to call an act domestic versus international terrorism and the political ramifications.

2:34am

Tue April 23, 2013
Around the Nation

Mississippi River Communities Brace For Flooding

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 12:05 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now here's a change. Earlier this year, the worst drought conditions seen in the Midwest in decades threatened to close the Mississippi River to barge traffic. Now, communities along the river in Missouri and Illinois are bracing for flooding.

St. Louis Public Radio Maria Altman reports.

MARIA ALTMAN, BYLINE: The threat of flooding on the Mississippi River came on quickly after last week's storms dumped rain across the Midwest. The town of Clarksville, Missouri didn't even have time to erect its metal flood wall.

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12:47am

Tue April 23, 2013
The Salt

Newspaper Takes The Pulse Of San Diego Coffee Culture

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 12:51 pm

John Rippo in July 2012 in a coffeehouse called Espresso Mio, in San Diego's Mission Hills neighborhood.
Courtesy of Josh Bletchely

Portland and Seattle may take coffee very seriously, but San Diego can boast a newspaper devoted entirely to coffee shops and all the news that's fit to print about them. John Rippo is the publisher of The Espresso, and he's convinced that coffee shops are the places to catch juicy moments of the human experience as they happen.

Inspired by European periodicals written for the cafe intelligentsia, Rippo curates local news in his monthly paper to inspire his fellow San Diego residents to social or political action.

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12:46am

Tue April 23, 2013
Author Interviews

For TV Networks, Stiff Competition To Be 'Top Of The Morning'

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 12:05 pm

Grafissimo iStockphoto.com

Last spring, what NBC fondly refers to as "America's First Family" went through a very public divorce. Ann Curry, who spent more than a decade as a news anchor on the Today show and less than a year as a host, was unexpectedly axed. "For all of you who saw me as a groundbreaker," Curry said with emotion in her last morning broadcast, "I'm sorry I couldn't carry the ball over the finish line. But man, I did try."

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12:44am

Tue April 23, 2013
The Salt

Journey Of A Specialty Coffee Bean, From Cherry To Cup

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 1:12 pm

Coffee beans are raked to dry in the sun in western Guatemala.
David Gilkey NPR

When we wanted to know how the growth of the specialty coffee movement is influencing the lives of farmers, we took a trip to the mountainous region of Huehuetenango in Guatemala.

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12:42am

Tue April 23, 2013
The Changing Lives Of Women

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 12:05 pm

Lucy Wang and Derek Wei represent the new modern Chinese bride and groom. With a lack of women in China, Wei had to pay more than $10,000 in a "bride price" to attract Wang to marry him.
Sim Chi Yin for NPR

Women hold up half the sky, China's Chairman Mao famously said. But in China, the one-child policy and the traditional preference for boys mean that 117 boys are born for every 100 baby girls. By one estimate, this means there could be 24 million Chinese men unable to find wives by the end of the decade.

As China's economy booms, the marriage market has become just that: a market, with new demands by women for apartments and cars.

But are women really benefiting from their scarcity?

Let's Make A Deal

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12:00am

Tue April 23, 2013

6:07pm

Mon April 22, 2013
Crosscurrents

Crosscurrents: April 22, 2013

Crosscurrents takes you behind prison walls at Pelican Bay, getting access to prisons as a reporter, and local musicians Voodoo Blues.

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5:00pm

Mon April 22, 2013
Cops & Courts

Behind the walls of California's most restricted cells

SHU hallway to cell pod.
Nancy Mullane

This story was the first of a six-part series following Nancy Mullane in her efforts to increase media access to prisons. It first aired in October 2012. It begins seven hours north of San Francisco in Crescent City and Pelican Bay State Prison. That’s where more than 1,100 of the inmates considered the most dangerous and influential in the state are locked up in the state’s Security Housing Unit also known as the SHU.

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4:38pm

Mon April 22, 2013
It's All Politics

Immigration Overhaul Seems On Track Despite Boston Tragedy

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 6:36 pm

Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. (right), talks during a hearing at which he angered Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa (far left). Grassley thought Schumer was accusing him of using the Boston bombings as an excuse to slow or kill the immigration overhaul.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

No sooner did the first reports emerge that the suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings were Chechen immigrants than did that fact intrude into Washington's debate on immigration.

Opponents of immigration reform seized on the fact to raise doubts about efforts to change immigration laws to, in part, bring the estimated 12 million people now in the U.S. illegally out of limbo.

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