3:46am

Thu April 18, 2013
The Two-Way

Texas Fertilizer Plant Blast Killed Several, Injured Dozens

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 5:04 pm

A chemical trailer sits among the remains of a fertilizer plant.
Mike Stone Reuters /Landov

After a fire and explosion at a fertilizer plant in West, Texas, that killed as many as 15 people and injured more than 160 others, rescue workers on Thursday are still sifting through the smoldering rubble hoping to find survivors.

Here's what we know at this hour:

Read more

3:31am

Thu April 18, 2013
Business

Despite Flaws, Harvard Economists Stand By Research

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Two prominent Harvard economists have admitted there are errors in an influential paper they wrote on government debt. This paper was widely cited in recent budget debates. But the economists insist their mistakes do not significantly change their research.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

JIM ZARROLI, BYLINE: In their 2010 paper, Ken Rogoff and Carmen Rinehart argued that economic growth falls significantly when a country's debt level rises above 90 percent of its Gross Domestic Product or GDP.

Read more

2:56am

Thu April 18, 2013
Politics

Obama's Pressure Fails To Get Gun Measure Passed

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, President Obama had promised to put the full weight of his office behind getting Congress to pass new gun control legislation. That weight was apparently not enough. When the legislation failed yesterday, Obama went into the White House Rose Garden and made a blistering speech, calling it a shameful day for Washington.

NPR's Ari Shapiro was there.

Read more

2:56am

Thu April 18, 2013
The Record

Coachella's Hometown Aims To Cash In On Fest's Rising Tide

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 1:30 pm

The crowd at Coachella on Sunday.
Frazer Harrison Getty Images for Coachella

Like many California cities hit hard by the real estate crash, Indio (near Palm Springs) has been forced to make steep cutbacks to avoid bankruptcy. But unlike other cities, Indio hosts the highest-grossing music festival in the world — Coachella — which wraps up this weekend. It has made city leaders eager to capitalize on Coachella's riches.

Sam Torres, plumber by day, Indio city councilman by night, says he was prepared to become the most hated man in the city, and he very well may have achieved that goal. His offense? Proposing a 6 percent tax on Coachella tickets.

Read more

2:03am

Thu April 18, 2013
The Record

The Diverse Influence Of The 2013 Rock Hall Inductees

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 9:22 am

Public Enemy on stage in 1988. The group will be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of fame Thursday.
Suzie Gibbons Redferns/Getty Images

12:26am

Thu April 18, 2013
Pop Culture

Cleveland Celebrates Superman, Its Hometown Hero

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 10:39 am

Panels from Action Comics No. 1, the first Superman comic, adorn the site of illustrator Joe Shuster's former apartment building, long since demolished.
Brian Bull/WCPN

April 18, 2013, is a big day for Superman. The Man of Steel, more powerful than a locomotive, turns 75. Most of us know Superman's story — faster than a speeding bullet, able to leap tall buildings in a single bound.

Less well-known is that the superhero is not native to the lost world of Krypton, nor the rural Kansas burg of Smallville. Superman is Cleveland's native son — at least as far as the city's residents are concerned.

Read more

12:17am

Thu April 18, 2013
The Picture Show

In 'Which Way,' A War Photographer In His Element

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 9:22 am

Spc. Tad Donoho screams with pain in 2008 after being administered a "pink belly" for his birthday in Korengal Valley, Kunar province, Afghanistan. Each member of the platoon strikes his stomach until it begins to bruise, hence the name pink belly. From the book Infidel.
Tim Hetherington Magnum Photos

At the 2011 Academy Awards, the film Restrepo was among the documentaries nominated for an Oscar. It follows an American platoon on a remote mountaintop in what was, at the time, the most dangerous place in Afghanistan.

To make the film, writer Sebastian Junger teamed up with British photojournalist Tim Hetherington — who, walking the red carpet that night at the Oscars, might as well have been a young actor straight out of central casting: tall, handsome, charismatic.

Read more

6:00pm

Wed April 17, 2013
Arts & Culture

Proposed museum would shine light on New Deal

Works Progress Administration

In the coming months, San Francisco’s grand Presidio park will announce a new tenant. The space up for grabs is the commissary building on Crissy Field, currently occupied by Sports Basement. And while George Lucas’ proposal for a museum of illustration has gotten the most press, there were 15 others, including a plan for a global observatory, a center dedicated to play, and a National New Deal Museum.

Read more
Tags: 

5:52pm

Wed April 17, 2013
YOUR legal rights 4/17

Law for artists and other entertainment professionals

Chuck Finney is joined by entertainment lawyers Laura Drossman and Robert Pimm.

Read more

5:45pm

Wed April 17, 2013
Arts & Culture

99 Percent Invisible: A cheer for Samuel Plimsoll

Plimsoll Line
wasabicube

If you look at the outer hull of commercial ships, you might find a painted circle bisected with a long horizontal line. This marking is called the load line, or as I prefer, the Plimsoll line. This simple graphic design has saved thousands of lives. The Plimsoll line shows the maximum loading point of the ship and lets a third party know, plainly and clearly, when a vessel is overloaded and at risk of sinking in rough seas. If you see that horizontal line above the water, you’re good, if you don’t, you could be sunk.

Read more

Pages