1:38am

Tue March 19, 2013
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 7:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Our last word in business today is filial piety.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

That's the ancient Chinese ethic of young people showing care and respect to their parents and older relatives. Now it's the law in China. Starting this summer, if kids don't pay enough attention to their folks, mom and dad can sue.

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1:38am

Tue March 19, 2013
NPR Story

1 Decade Since The War, Where Iraq Stands Now

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 9:00 am

An Iraqi policeman stands guard at a checkpoint decorated with plastic flowers in Baghdad in 2008.
Ali Yussef AFP/Getty Images

Ten years after the U.S.-led war in Iraq, NPR is looking at where the country stands now. NPR's Kelly McEvers recently visited Baghdad and offered this take on how the Iraqi capital feels today.

I think the single word that would best describe Baghdad these days is traffic. It can take hours just to get from one place to another. And I guess that's both good and bad.

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12:18am

Tue March 19, 2013
Around the Nation

Historian Propels Connecticut To Claim 'First In Flight'

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 5:35 pm

Gustave Whitehead and the No. 21. Connecticut claims that Whitehead's half-mile flight in 1901 was the first flight, not the well-known Wright brothers' flight that occurred two years later.
Courtesy Deutsches Flugpioniermuseum Gustav Weisskopf Leutershausen/Historical Flight Research Committee Gustave Whitehead

The ongoing battle between historians over who was really first in flight was rekindled last week.

New research advances the theory that a German immigrant in Connecticut is responsible for the first powered and controlled flight, rather than the Wright brothers in North Carolina.

But historians at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum are saying not so fast.

Finding The Evidence

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12:16am

Tue March 19, 2013
Shots - Health News

Bioethics Panel Warns Against Anthrax Vaccine Testing On Kids

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 7:42 am

The anthrax vaccine has been given to more than 1 million adults in the military. But no one knows how well it would work in children.
Randy Davey Reuters/Landov

A controversial government proposal to test the anthrax vaccine in children would be unethical without first conducting much more research, a presidential commission concluded Tuesday.

"The federal government would have to take multiple steps before anthrax vaccine trials with children could be ethically considered," Amy Gutmann, who chairs the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, tells Shots. "It would not be ethical to do it today."

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12:15am

Tue March 19, 2013
Shots - Health News

Alzheimer's 'Epidemic' Now A Deadlier Threat To Elderly

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 4:44 am

Social worker Nuria Casulleres shows a portrait of Audrey Hepburn to elderly men during a memory activity at the Cuidem La Memoria elderly home in Barcelona, Spain, last August. The home specializes in Alzheimer's patients.
David Ramos Getty Images

Alzheimer's disease doesn't just steal memories. It takes lives.

The disease is now the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S., and figures released Tuesday by the Alzheimer's Association show that deaths from the disease increased by 68 percent between 2000 and 2010.

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8:22pm

Mon March 18, 2013
Folk Music & Beyond this Sat. 3 pm

Record Producer Joe Boyd Sits In As Guest DJ this Sat. 3 pm!

Vashti Bunyan & Joe Boyd at SXSW 2007

Legendary record producer Joe Boyd (Pink Floyd, Eric Clapton, John Sebastian, Kate & Anna McGarrigle, Maria Muldaur, Incredible String Band, Richard Thompson) spins the discs this Saturday 3 pm on "Folk Music & Beyond."  Joe will share his favorites selected from his vast record archive.  Plus, we'll hear songs from Joe's latest project "Way To Blue: The Songs of Nick Drake" performed by various artists, including Robyn Hitchcock, Teddy Thompson, Lisa Hannigan, Vashti Bunyan, Shane Nicholson.

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6:48pm

Mon March 18, 2013
Economy/Labor/Biz

Money Diaries: Next year will be better

For the next few weeks, KALW News will be presenting stories from young people in Oakland, talking about their relationships with money. It’s part of a collaboration with the Oakland-based nonprofit Game Theory Academy, which works with low-income youth to improve their economic decision-making skills. Independent producer Lisa Morehouse worked with students at Game Theory Academy to record their experiences, in pieces we’re calling Money Diaries. In this segment we meet Caelin Robinson, who is 17 years old.

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6:40pm

Mon March 18, 2013
Arts & Culture

San Francisco Symphony cancels tour as pay negotiations continue

Davies Symphony Hall in San Francisco

The San Francisco Symphony has canceled its East Coast tour, which included performances at the prestigious Carnegie Hall and Kennedy Center in New York. The decision came after pay negotiations between the Symphony’s administration and musicians failed to reach a resolution. The musicians have been striking since Wednesday.

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6:30pm

Mon March 18, 2013
Transportation

BART tries out letting bikes on board during commute hours

A bike commuter rides BART during a pilot period that allows bikes on trains during peak hours.
Isabel Angell

Usually, bikes aren’t allowed on San Francisco-bound BART trains during peak morning commute hours, or back to the East Bay in the evening. And they’re not allowed in the 19th Street or 12th Street stations during commute hours at all. But this week, BART has opened up all hours and stations to bikers. It’s a trial period, and to make it work, BART officials and cycling groups are urging to riders follow the rules: no bikes on the first three cars during peak hours, and no bikes on crowded trains.

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6:22pm

Mon March 18, 2013
Arts & Culture

Film festival opens a window to Asian American family life

Courtesy of caamfest.com

What we learn from our families is often very private. It’s knowledge we keep inside of us – and that the world doesn’t always get a chance to see. Filmmaker Mark Decena is hoping to open a window onto that kind of family life with his new film, The War Inside, involving his own childhood home movies. The film is a project of the Center for Asian American Media, CAAM, which is hosting its 31st annual festival this year and launching a new national initiative to collect and preserve Asian American home movies.  KALW's Ben Trefny spoke with Decena about the value of finally bringing these national memories to light, and Decena's personal contribution to the collection.

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