11:43am

Fri April 5, 2013
Economy

Honda's Growth Helps Tow Ohio Out Of Recession

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 3:04 pm

Al Kinzer, who was Honda of America's first employee, drives the company's one millionth U.S.-produced car off the assembly line at Honda's assembly plant in Marysville, Ohio, April 8, 1988.
Greg Sailor AP

Honda is moving its North American headquarters from California to Ohio. That's just the latest bit of good news for the Buckeye State and Honda, whose fortunes have been closely tied for decades now.

Honda has been an economic heavyweight here since it was lured to central Ohio in the 1970s. The company's footprint is big, and it continues to increase.

Honda's sprawling Marysville Auto Plant opened outside Columbus in 1982. Since then, it has grown to nearly 4 million square feet and now sits on a campus of 8,000 acres.

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11:15am

Fri April 5, 2013
The Two-Way

Pope Francis Calls For 'Decisive Action' On Clerical Sex Abuse

Pope Francis greets the faithful on March 31, 2013 in Vatican City.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Pope Francis told his staff to take "decisive action" when it comes to cases of clerical sex abuse of minors.

In a statement, the Vatican said the pontiff ordered the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith to "act decisively as far as cases of sexual abuse are concerned, promoting, above all, measures to protect minors, help for those who have suffered such violence in the past (and) the necessary procedures against those who are guilty."

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11:10am

Fri April 5, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Coughing And The Meaning Of Art

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 11:29 am

Musical instruments wait for the arrival of the orchestra during the closing session of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 12.
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

A few years back, I attended a Keith Jarrett solo piano recital at Davies Symphony Hall in San Francisco. The hall, which seats nearly 3,000 people, was sold out.

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10:41am

Fri April 5, 2013
Shots - Health News

Lead In Soil May Be An Overlooked Threat To Kids' Health

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 4:43 pm

Industrial cities like Detroit have high levels of lead in the aging housing stock and in soils. Researchers found that the amount of soil lead in Detroit that gets suspended in the air correlated with the levels of lead in kids' blood.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Lead poisoning in kids is hardly the problem it used to be, now that we've stopped using lead in house paints and gasoline. But the lead that lingers outside and in old homes is still dangerous if kids are exposed to it.

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10:29am

Fri April 5, 2013
Economy/Labor/Biz

Careers in the 2nd Half of Life

Many people are in the no-man's land.  They're not ready to retire--they want or need to work but no one will hire them except for a McJob.

Two new books that offer help: Second-Act Careers, and Encore Careers. On the Apr. 7, 2013 edition of Work with Marty Nemko, Drs Barbara and Marty Nemko discuss the stories of people who made an interesting career change in the 2nd half of life.

Plus listeners call in for a 3-Minute Workover--Marty and Barbara try to help you overcome your career conundrum.

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10:01am

Fri April 5, 2013
Economy

Jobs Report: 'Ouch!'

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 7:19 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later in the program, we will speak with a Christian leader who's led his church to rethink both its politics and its worship. It's the Reverend Cecil Williams of San Francisco's Glide Memorial Church. He and his wife, who's also a church leader, will join us for a Faith Matters conversation in a few minutes.

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9:42am

Fri April 5, 2013
The Two-Way

Puzzling, Shaky Start To New Round Of Iran Talks

The negotiating table in Almaty, Kazakhstan, where the U.S. and other nations are talking with Iran about that nation's nuclear ambitions.
Ilyas Omarov AFP/Getty Images

The first day of the latest talks between Iran and the so-called P5+1 group about the Persian nation's nuclear ambitions has ended with reports of a "shaky" start and Western diplomats saying they are puzzled by what Iran brought to the table.

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9:22am

Fri April 5, 2013
Barbershop

Rutgers Coach Firing: Have We Gotten Too Soft?

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 7:19 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barbershop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

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9:15am

Fri April 5, 2013
Remembrances

Roger Ebert In Review: A 'Fresh Air' Survey

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 10:10 am

The iconic Chicago photographer Art Shay took portraits of presidents, prizefighters, prose poets — and in the person of Roger Ebert, at least one Pulitzer-winning critic.
Art Shay

Fresh Air remembers the film critic and bon vivant Roger Ebert, who died Thursday, with a roundup of interviews from our archive.

In one, from all the way back in 1984, host Terry Gross talks with Ebert alone; in a second conversation, from 1996, Terry interviews both Ebert and his late partner Gene Siskel onstage at Northwestern University.

In two very special conversations, Ebert himself interviews iconic directors Francis Ford Coppola and Martin Scorsese.

And finally, critic-at-large John Powers discusses Ebert's 2011 memoir Life Itself.

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8:04am

Fri April 5, 2013
The Salt

Freezing Food Doesn't Kill E. Coli And Other Germs

The NPR Science Desk freezer: now we know we can't presume it's germ-free.
Daniel M.N. Turner NPR

Think that freezing food kills E. coli and other nasty microbes? Think again.

That's the lesson from the new E. coli outbreak caused by frozen chicken quesadillas and other snacks that has sickened 24 people in 15 states.

Freezing does slow down the microbes that cause food to spoil, but it's pretty much useless for killing dangerous bugs.

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