2:35pm

Wed March 13, 2013
Business

Fast Fashion's Challenge: Making Money With 'Made In The USA'

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 4:02 pm

American Apparel boasts that all of its products are made in the USA, primarily at its Los Angeles headquarters. Selling garments produced largely by machine, rather than by hand, has helped the company remain profitable.
Mark Ralston Getty Images

In the world of fast fashion, two U.S.-based companies loom large: Forever 21 and American Apparel. Both are based in Los Angeles, but the two could not be more different.

American Apparel proudly boasts that the clothes it sells are "made in the USA." In contrast, Forever 21 subcontracts with factories all over the world.

Dov Charney, American Apparel's Canadian-American founder and CEO, has a reputation. "I knew from a very early age — in elementary school — that I was going to rub some people the wrong way," he says.

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2:10pm

Wed March 13, 2013
The Salt

Sorry, But Bananas Won't Calm Your Caffeine Jitters

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 6:43 am

Some baristas swear that bananas can cure your coffee jitters, but the science just doesn't add up.
Daniel M.N. Turner NPR

It happens to the best of us. You drink one too many cups of coffee and, for the next few hours, you end up acting like a hyper preschooler who just can't sit still.

Which can be pretty inconvenient if it's, say, noon and you're at the office, or if it's midnight and you can't fall asleep.

Wouldn't it be nice if there were something quick and easy that you could take to combat the effects of over-caffeination? Something like ... a banana?

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2:01pm

Wed March 13, 2013
Around the Nation

Health Problems Compound For Aging Homeless

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 5:27 pm

Tony Lithgow, 49, and Andrea Mayer, 51, live together on the streets of Baltimore. Researchers say the aging homeless population is due to younger baby boomers who came of age during the 1970s and '80s, when there were back-to-back recessions.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Tony Lithgow and Andrea Mayer have been living under a highway overpass in downtown Baltimore since last year. He's 49 and has been homeless on and off for eight years. She's 51 and has been homeless for 10 years.

Living on the streets has clearly taken a toll on the couple, both physically and mentally. While they're standing at a corner waiting for a free city bus to take them to a soup kitchen, Tony shouts at a passenger staring at them from a car stopped at the light.

"We're homeless!" he calls out to the man.

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1:39pm

Wed March 13, 2013
The Two-Way

Pope Francis: What Happens After A Papal Election

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 3:53 pm

After Argentine Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio was elected as the 266th pontiff, he chose the name Pope Francis. His installation Mass could come early next week.
Jeff J Mitchell Getty Images

As news spread that the chimney atop the Sistine Chapel was billowing white smoke to signal the election of Pope Francis, anticipation built for the new pontiff's first appearance on the balcony of St. Peter's Basilica.

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1:36pm

Wed March 13, 2013
The Two-Way

Who Is Pope Francis I?

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 6:41 pm

Argentine Archbishop Jorge Bergoglio during a mass for Ash Wednesday, opening Lent on February 13, 2013 at the Metropolitan Cathedral in Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Juan Mabromata AFP/Getty Images

The new pope, 76-year-old Jorge Bergoglio, the archbishop of Buenos Aires, is the first pontiff from Latin America and the first Jesuit, but he appears to hold views very much in line with his predecessor, Pope Benedict XVI.

Bergoglio has chosen the papal name Francis, becoming the 266th to hold the title of spiritual leader of the Catholic Church.

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1:29pm

Wed March 13, 2013
The Two-Way

Upon News Of Argentinian Pope, Latin Americans Are Overjoyed

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 5:01 pm

Faithful react after the announcement that Buenos Aires archbishop Jorge Mario Bergoglio was elected Pope Francis I, at Metropolitan Cathedral in Buenos Aires on Wednesday.
Juan Mabromata AFP/Getty Images

Pope Francis goes into history as the first pontiff from the New World.

For Latin America in particular, this is a momentous occasion: It is home to 483 million Catholics, or a little more than 40 percent of the global population.

Pope Francis was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, of Italian parents. At one point, he was the archbishop of the Buenos Aires diocese, which The Wall Street Journal reports, has "the largest concentration of Catholics in the world."

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1:24pm

Wed March 13, 2013
It's All Politics

On Message: The Battle To Define 'Balanced' Budget

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 3:12 pm

A member of the House Budget Committee holds a copy of the Republican budget proposal on Tuesday in Washington.
Gary Cameron Reuters /Landov

In the ongoing Washington budget battles, one word gets more of a workout than most: balanced.

This single word illustrates the vast distance between the parties. Democrats and Republicans are working from very different definitions of the term in discussing their budget proposals being unveiled this week.

What Democrats are saying: A balanced budget is deficit reduction through a mix of tax increases and spending cuts. As in: We want a balanced approach to reducing the deficit.

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1:12pm

Wed March 13, 2013
Out In The Bay 3-13-14

A Simple Revolution: Judy Grahn, feminist poet

Judy Grahn, author, "A Simple Revolution: The Making of a An Activist Poet"

Host and Producer Marilyn Pittman interviews lesbian feminist pioneer, Judy Grahn, whose "Common Woman" poems inspired the early 70's feminist movement. Marilyn's 1982 NPR-funded series "By A Woman Writ" profiled Judy and her work. This show will feature audio from that program of actors performing her words. Judy is now Co-Director of The Women's Spirituality Program at Sofia University in Palo Alto, CA. 7pm. http://www.sofia.edu/academics/faculty/grahn.php

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12:08pm

Wed March 13, 2013

11:38am

Wed March 13, 2013
Shots - Health News

Dengue Fever No Longer Just A Visitor To Florida Keys

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 8:02 am

If you catch dengue fever in the Western Hemisphere, it most likely came from the Aedes aegypti mosquito.
Muhammad Mahdi Karim Wikimedia.org

If you're heading down to Florida for spring break, consider packing bug spray and long-sleeve shirts.

After a 60-year hiatus, the mosquito-borne illness dengue fever officially re-established itself there.

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