7:48am

Fri November 30, 2012
Africa

Tanzania's Albinos Face Constant Threat Of Attack

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 3:44 pm

Angel Salvatory, 17, buys cloth at a market in Kabanga village in Tanzania. Albinos living in a nearby protection center are allowed to go to the local market as long as they travel in a group for their own safety.
Jacquelyn Martin for NPR

Life is hard for albinos throughout Africa, but especially in the East African nation of Tanzania. At best, they face raw prejudice; at worst, they are hunted for their flesh, the results of superstitious beliefs.

Albino killings have been reported in a dozen African countries from South Africa to Kenya, but they are worse in Tanzania than anywhere else.

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6:55am

Fri November 30, 2012
The Two-Way

Train Derails Near Philadelphia, Some Chemicals Reportedly Spilled

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 7:54 am

The scene of the derailment today in Paulsboro, N.J., from above.
NBC10 Philadephia

There's a developing story this morning from Paulsboro, N.J., south and across the Delaware River from Philadelphia, where several railroad tank cars have derailed and fallen into a creek after a bridge collapse.

It's being reported that the cars were transporting vinyl chloride, which could ignite and would be highly irritating if breathed in. There are local reports of about 18 people being treated for breathing problems.

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6:12am

Fri November 30, 2012
The Two-Way

Consumer Spending Dipped In October; Superstorm Sandy Blamed

Nov. 17: A sign in a Staten Island storefront tells a lot. It was still closed because of the damage done by Superstorm Sandy in late October.
Mario Tama Getty Images

The economic effects of Superstorm Sandy continue to be felt. According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, consumer spending edged down 0.2 percent in October from September, and personal income dipped 0.1 percent.

As Bloomberg News says, "Sandy kept some in the Northeast from getting to work or from shopping at malls and car dealerships."

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5:53am

Fri November 30, 2012
The Two-Way

Today's Three Stories To Read About The 'Fiscal Cliff'

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner as he arrived at the Capitol on Thursday for negotiations with congressional leaders.
Alex Wong Getty Images

The White House and congressional leaders continue to talk about taxes, spending cuts and how to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff that arrives at midnight Dec. 31 — when Bush-era tax cuts are set to expire and automatic spending cuts are set to go into effect.

As NPR and others cover the story, we'll try to to point to interesting reports and analyses. Here are three of the latest.

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5:29am

Fri November 30, 2012
KALW Almanac

Friday November 30, 2012

1886 --- Folies de Bergere (highlighted story below)
  • 335th Day of 2012 / 31 Remaining
  • 21 Days Until The First Day of Winter
  • Sunrise:7:06
  • Sunset:4:51
  • 9 Hours 46 Minutes of Daylight
  • Moon Rise:6:50pm
  • Moon Set:8:43am
  • Moon’s Phase: 99 %
  • The Next Full Moon
  • December 28 @ 2:22 am
  • Full Cold Moon
  • Full Long Nights Moon

During this month the winter cold fastens its grip, and nights are at their longest and darkest. It is also sometimes called the Moon before Yule. The term Long Night Moon is a doubly appropriate name because the midwinter night is indeed long, and because the Moon is above the horizon for a long time. The midwinter full Moon has a high trajectory across the sky because it is opposite a low Sun.

  • Tides
  • High: 12:31am/10:47am
  • Low: 5:10am/5:54pm
  • Rainfall (measured July 1 – June 30)
  • This Year:4.46
  • Last Year:3.20
  • Normal To Date:4.54
  • Annual Seasonal Average:23.80
  • Holidays
  • National Mousse Day
  • Computer Security Day
  • Stay Home Because You're Well Day
  • Independence Day-Barbados
  • Bonafacio Day-Philippines
  • Harvest Holiday-Turkmenistan
  • On This Day In …
  • 1782 --- The United States and Britain signed preliminary peace articles in Paris, ending the Revolutionary War.
  • 1804 --- U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Chase went on trial accused of political bias. He was later acquitted by the U.S. Senate.
  • 1838 --- The Great Pastry War. A brief conflict began today between Mexico and France caused by a French pastry cook who claimed that some Mexican Army soldiers had damaged his restaurant.  The Mexican government refused to pay for damages.  Several other countries had pressed the Mexican government for similar claims in the past due to civil unrest in Mexico.  France decided to do something about it, and sent a fleet to Veracruz and fired on the fortress outside the harbor.  They occupied the city on April 16, 1838, and through the mediation of Great Britain were promised payment of 600,000 pesos for the damages. They withdrew on March 9, 1839.
  • 1858 --- John Landis Mason patented the Mason Jar.
  • 1886 --- Once a hall for operettas, pantomime, political meetings, and vaudeville, the Folies Bergère in Paris introduces an elaborate revue featuring women in sensational costumes. The highly popular "Place aux Jeunes" established the Folies as the premier nightspot in Paris. In the 1890s, the Folies followed the Parisian taste for striptease and quickly gained a reputation for its spectacular nude shows. The theater spared no expense, staging revues that featured as many as 40 sets, 1,000 costumes, and an off-stage crew of some 200 people. The Folies Bergère dates back to 1869, when it opened as one of the first major music halls in Paris. It produced light opera and pantomimes with unknown singers and proved a resounding failure. Greater success came in the 1870s, when the Folies Bergère staged vaudeville. Among other performers, the early vaudeville shows featured acrobats, a snake charmer, a boxing kangaroo, trained elephants, the world's tallest man, and a Greek prince who was covered in tattoos allegedly as punishment for trying to seduce the Shah of Persia's daughter. The public was allowed to drink and socialize in the theater's indoor garden and promenade area, and the Folies Bergère became synonymous with the carnal temptations of the French capital. Famous paintings by Édouard Manet and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec were set in the Folies. In 1886, the Folies Bergère went under new management, which, on November 30, staged the first revue-style music hall show. The "Place aux Jeunes," featuring scantily clad chorus girls, was a tremendous success. The Folies women gradually wore less and less as the 20th century approached, and the show's costumes and sets became more and more outrageous. Among the performers who got their start at the Folies Bergère were Yvette Guilbert, Maurice Chevalier, and Mistinguett. The African American dancer and singer Josephine Baker made her Folies debut in 1926, lowered from the ceiling in a flower-covered sphere that opened onstage to reveal her wearing a G-string ornamented with bananas. The Folies Bergère remained a success throughout the 20th century and still can be seen in Paris today, although the theater now features many mainstream concerts and performances. Among other traditions that date back more than a century, the show's title always contains 13 letters and includes the word "Folie."
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5:10am

Fri November 30, 2012
The Two-Way

In Egypt: Draft Of Constitution OK'd; Protesters Return To Tahrir Square

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 5:25 am

A protester shouts early Friday in Cairo's Tahrir Square.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

Protesters have streamed into Cairo's Tahrir Square again today, correspondent Merrit Kennedy tells our Newscast Desk.

She says they're there both to demonstrate again against President Mohammed Morsi's decree giving himself sweeping new powers and to express concern about a draft constitution passed early today by Egypt's constitutional assembly.

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4:05am

Fri November 30, 2012
Digital Life

Woman Turns To Facebook To Help Find Beloved Hat

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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4:05am

Fri November 30, 2012
Strange News

Toilet-Paper Thief Returns 80 Rolls To University

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The holidays bring out the spirit of giving and giving back what you've pilfered. Recently, we told you about a 1930s teapot returned to the Waldorf Astoria. This morning: a tale of toilet paper. Eastern New Mexico University received a gift box filled with 80 rolls of toilet paper and a Christmas card apologizing for stealing rolls from a dorm years ago. Another inspiring holiday moment, or another TP prank? It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

2:04am

Fri November 30, 2012
Latin America

High Expectations As Mexico's Pena Nieto Takes Helm

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 4:05 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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2:04am

Fri November 30, 2012
Middle East

Damascus Remains Cut Off By Fighting

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 4:05 am

For a second day, the Syrian capital, Damascus is cut off from the outside world, with the international airport shut, the Internet down and mobile phone lines working sporadically. There are reports of fierce clashes around the capital and heavy airstrikes in the capital's suburbs and in the northern city of Aleppo.

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