3:09am

Mon March 11, 2013
Strange News

Widow Sues Church Over Sports-Themed Headstone

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 4:23 am

An Indiana woman wanted to honor her late husband with a headstone shaped like a couch, and featuring Indianapolis Colts and NASCAR logos. St. Joseph's Catholic Church said the headstone is completely inappropriate — so the widow sued.

3:08am

Mon March 11, 2013
Strange News

Tattoo Gets Man Free Netflix For A Year

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 4:23 am

Myron Robinson managed to score a year of free Netflix videos and online streaming by tweeting a photo of his new Netflix tattoo. The company tweeted back, "No way! Free year for you!"

2:10am

Mon March 11, 2013
Art & Design

For John Baldessari, Conceptual Art Means Serious Mischief

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 11:14 am

Courtesy the artist/John Baldessari Studio

There are certain creations that have defined beauty for generations: Renoir's pudgy, pink nude; Rothko's brilliant blocks of color that seem to vibrate; Michelangelo's naked young man in marble, with a slingshot on his shoulder.

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2:10am

Mon March 11, 2013
All Tech Considered

Controlling Your Computer With A Wave Of Your Hand

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 5:48 am

Festival attendees experiment with Leap Motion technology.
Elise Hu NPR

If you've had wrist and shoulder pain from clicking a mouse, relief may be in sight. This spring, a new motion sensing device will go on sale that will make it possible for the average computer user to browse the Web and open documents with a wave of a finger.

The Leap Motion Controller is on display at the South by Southwest Interactive conference in Austin, Texas, for the first time. It's one of the most talked about startups at the conference, where some 26,000 people have gathered to see emerging tech companies.

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2:10am

Mon March 11, 2013
Shots - Health News

New Voices For The Voiceless: Synthetic Speech Gets An Upgrade

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 10:23 am

Samantha Grimaldo was born with a rare disorder, Perisylvian syndrome, and has never been able to speak.
Ellen Webber for NPR

Ever since she was a small child, Samantha Grimaldo has had to carry her voice with her.

Grimaldo was born with a rare disorder, Perisylvian syndrome, which means that though she's physically capable in many ways, she's never been able to speak. Instead, she's used a device to speak. She types in what she wants to say, and the device says those words out loud. Her mother, Ruane Grimaldo, says that when Samantha was very young, the voice she used came in a heavy gray box.

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1:40am

Mon March 11, 2013
Author Interviews

'Lean In': Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg Explains What's Holding Women Back

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 1:37 pm

Courtesy Knopf

Of all the posters plastered around Facebook's Silicon Valley headquarters — "Move Fast and Break Things," "Done Is Better Than Perfect" and "Fail Harder" — Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg has a favorite: "What Would You Do If You Weren't Afraid?"

"[It's] something that I think is really important and I think very motivating," Sandberg tells NPR's Renee Montagne. " ... I wrote in my book, what I would do if I wasn't afraid is, I would speak out more on behalf of women."

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1:40am

Mon March 11, 2013
Shots - Health News

Depression And Anxiety Could Be Fukushima's Lasting Legacy

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 4:23 am

A road leading back to the Togawas' old home in the seaside village of Namie is closed due to radioactive contamination.
Geoff Brumfiel NPR

Two years ago today, an earthquake and tsunami triggered a meltdown at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Hundreds of thousands of people living near the plant were forced to flee. The World Health Organization recently predicted a very small rise in cancer risk from radioactive material that was released. For the nuclear refugees, though, anxiety and depression could be the more persistent hazard. Correspondent Geoff Brumfiel traveled to Fukushima prefecture and met victims of the accident to see how they are coping.

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1:34am

Mon March 11, 2013
Shots - Health News

Aspirin Vs. Melanoma: Study Suggests Headache Pill Prevents Deadly Skin Cancer

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 7:22 am

A doctor checks for signs of skin cancer at a free cancer screening day in New York City.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

It's not the first study that finds the lowly aspirin may protect against the deadliest kind of skin cancer, but it is one of the largest.

And it adds to a mounting pile of studies suggesting that cheap, common aspirin lowers the risk of many cancers — of the colon, breast, esophagus, stomach, prostate, bladder and ovary.

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11:48pm

Sun March 10, 2013

8:36pm

Sun March 10, 2013
Minds Over Matter 3/10/2013

Minds Over Matter

Tonight with Dana Rodriguez and Gerry Nachman.

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