12:25am

Fri November 16, 2012
Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond

Want To Help Sandy Victims? Send Cash, Not Clothes

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 1:47 am

Volunteers sort through donated clothes in Sea Bright, N.J.
Pam Fessler NPR

Whenever there's a disaster, people want to give, and Hurricane Sandy is no exception. According to The Chronicle of Philanthropy, U.S. charities collected more than $174 million in donations as of Nov. 9 to help respond to the storm.

But it's not only money that has been pouring in. Relief programs have also received mountains of clothes, food and other supplies, not all of which are needed.

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12:19am

Fri November 16, 2012
Movie Interviews

Director Joe Wright On Tolstoy's Iconic Adultress

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 1:47 am

Director Joe Wright has directed just four full-length features, but he has already made his mark on Hollywood with hits like Pride and Prejudice and Atonement.
Slaven Vlasic Getty Images

Leo Tolstoy's epic novel Anna Karenina has captivated readers since the 1800s — and movie directors have been among the intrigued, adapting the story over and over.

The latest is from director Joe Wright, who with Pride and Prejudice and Atonement to his credit certainly knows his way around a literary adaptation. Those films starred Keira Knightley, who has worked with Wright once again as the story's tragic heroine.

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11:53pm

Thu November 15, 2012
Politics

Friday Media Roundtable: Conflict in Gaza

Jihad Misharawi, BBC Journalist, Loses Son Omar In Israeli Strike On Gaza
AP

On today's Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss coverage of California’s new "cap and trade" program. We’ll also talk about the widening Israeli military attack on Gaza. We’ll be join by San Francisco Chronicle’s David Baker, environmental journalist Mark Schapiro and freelance journalist Mohammed Omer joins us from Gaza. Where did you see the best reporting this week? Join us live at 10 or send and email to feedback@yourcallrado.org.

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5:29pm

Thu November 15, 2012
Education

What does Proposition 30 mean for California public schools?

This election season, possibly the most talked about ballot item in California after the presidential race was Proposition 30. For all of 2012, we’ve been hearing people support or attack Governor Jerry Brown’s tax plan for education. On November 6, the people spoke in favor of the taxes. Now that it has passed, where does this money go and how will education truly be affected by it?

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5:23pm

Thu November 15, 2012
Jazz Perspectives

Jazz Perspectives: Angelique Kidjo

Angelique Kidjo was born in the West African country of Benin. She grew up listening to traditional music but was soon influenced by American rhythm and blues singers and jazz artists. She started composing at age 10, writing about political topics starting at a very early age.

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4:49pm

Thu November 15, 2012
Crosscurrents

Crosscurrents: November 15, 2012

What does Proposition 30 mean for California public schools?; Court budget crisis creates long lines at legal self-help centers; and Jazz Perspectives: Angelique Kidjo.

To subscribe to the Crosscurrents podcast in iTunes, click here. To use another podcasting tool, click here.

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4:03pm

Thu November 15, 2012
Heavy Rotation

Heavy Rotation: 5 Songs Public Radio Can't Stop Playing

Originally published on Mon January 7, 2013 10:19 am

KCEP in Las Vegas can't stop playing Avant's new jam, "You and I," which features R&B singer Keke Wyatt.
Courtesy of the artist

Every so often, people at an NPR station discover a song they can't get enough of. On those occasions, we ask them to share their obsession with the nation. Ben Famous is the music director at KCEP Power88 in Las Vegas. He spoke to Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep about a new cut from R&B heavyweight Avant. It's called "You and I," and it features Keke Wyatt. "The first time we played it," says Famous, "the phone lines lit up, and people were like, 'Who was that?' 'What was that?'"

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3:30pm

Thu November 15, 2012
The Two-Way

ICE Agent Settles Harassment Suit With U.S. Government

The Associated Press has an update on a story we told you about this past summer:

"A senior agent for Immigration and Customs Enforcement and the government have agreed to settle a discrimination lawsuit, according a court record filed Thursday.

"In a two-sentence notice, a lawyer for ICE Agent James T. Hayes Jr. said the 'parties have come to an agreement in principal' to settle the case for $175,000.

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3:13pm

Thu November 15, 2012
Cops & Courts

Court budget crisis creates long lines at legal self-help centers

Under CC license from Flickr user s_falkow

One of the areas hit hardest by state budget cuts is California’s judicial branch. Governor Jerry Brown and the Legislature cut $350 million from the court system this past fiscal year.

In response, courts across the state have had to reduce hours and lay off staff. In San Diego, San Bernardino, Tulare, and Fresno counties, whole courthouses have closed down. That means people who have civil and family court proceedings like restraining orders, custody cases, and divorce will have to travel further, wait longer, and pay more to use the legal system.

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3:10pm

Thu November 15, 2012
It's All Politics

Geography, Not Gerrymandering, May Explain GOP's Hold On House

A man votes on Nov. 6 in Chicago.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Some Democrats complain that Republicans in recent decades have had the edge in House races because GOP state legislatures have been better at the gerrymandering game. Except that may not be true.

Some political experts believe there's an easier explanation, and perhaps a tougher one for Democrats to overcome: Voters supporting Republican House candidates, they say, are spread over more congressional districts than those who support Democrats. It's that simple. It's merely a matter of geography.

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