2:13am

Sat February 23, 2013
It's All Politics

States Take Sides As Court Revisits Voting Rights Act

President Lyndon Johnson and civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. discuss the Voting Rights Act in 1965. On Wednesday, the Supreme Court hears arguments on whether a key part of the law is still needed nearly a half century after its passage.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments next week in a case that tests the constitutionality of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, the law considered the most effective civil rights statute in American history. At issue is whether a key provision of the statute has outlived its usefulness.

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2:12am

Sat February 23, 2013
Africa

Fighting Stream Of Terrorist Capital, Kenya Cracks Down On Somali Businesses

Originally published on Sat February 23, 2013 7:26 pm

People walk down a market street in Eastleigh, a predominantly Muslim Somali neighborhood in Nairobi, Kenya, in 2009. The neighborhood has come under scrutiny as the U.S. cracks down on terrorism financing.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

U.S. counterterrorism efforts include choking off the flow of cash to extremists, and urging friendly countries to help. But in Nairobi, Kenya, suspicion of Somali money — and an increase in terrorist attacks — has prompted a country-wide crackdown, with Kenyan police accused of extortion and arbitrary arrests of thousands of Somali refugees.

But how do you tell the difference between tainted money and honest cash?

Take Eastleigh, a neighborhood in the Kenyan capital, Nairobi.

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2:10am

Sat February 23, 2013
The Salt

A Dramatic Way To Uncork The Bubbly: Use A Sword

Originally published on Sat February 23, 2013 6:07 pm

Brice from the Bubble Lounge in New York City demonstrates how to saber a bottle of champagne.
About.com

4:25pm

Fri February 22, 2013
Cops & Courts

East Bay Express: The fate of alcohol at First Fridays

The City of Oakland plans to clamp down on drinking at the popular monthly street festival, but it promises to be an uphill battle.
Courtesy of EastBayExpress.com

A few months ago, Kim Nguyen realized she had a problem on her hands — except maybe it wasn't a problem, or at least it was the kind of problem every business owner dreams of having: Saigon Market, the narrow, cluttered convenience store that she runs along with her husband just north of the corner of Telegraph Avenue and 23rd Street, was absolutely overrun with customers. Or rather, it was overrun exactly one night a month: the first Friday, when the art walk and street fair of the same name descends on Uptown Oakland, its center right in front of her little store.

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3:26pm

Fri February 22, 2013
Out in the Bay - Feb. 21

Repealing DOMA to help bi-national LGBT couples

Judy Rickard, left, and her wife, Karen Bogliolo

  

2013 is shaping up to be a historic year for marriage equality. The Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA, is facing repeal in Congress and the Supreme Court. DOMA is blocking the way for bi-national gay couples to be allowed to stay in the U.S.

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3:06pm

Fri February 22, 2013
Science

Boston Grapples With The Threat Of Storms And Rising Water

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 4:02 pm

The Boston Tea Party museum sits right on the edge of the harbor. With rising sea levels and the increasing threat of strong storms, buildings like these are at particular risk of flooding.
Christopher Joyce NPR

Since the drubbing that Superstorm Sandy gave the Northeast in November, there's a new sense of urgency in U.S. coastal cities. Even though scientists can't predict the next big hurricane, they're confident that a warmer climate is likely to make Atlantic storms bigger and cause more flooding.

Cities like Boston are in the bull's-eye.

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3:06pm

Fri February 22, 2013
It's All Politics

What's The Sequester? And How Did We Get Here?

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 4:26 pm

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood (left) answers questions during a briefing with White House Press Secretary Jay Carney on Friday.
Win McNamee Getty Images

They've been everywhere this week: dire warnings about threats posed by across-the-board federal spending cuts.

Unless Congress acts, the cuts are due to take effect a week from Friday. The administration is trying to drive home the ways that could affect you.

For example, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood warned Friday that air traffic controllers will have to take unpaid days off beginning in April. Fewer controllers on the job could mean airport delays, and some airlines may decide to cancel flights.

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2:59pm

Fri February 22, 2013
Arts & Culture

Can you guess the Audiograph sound this week? February 25, 2013

Poster designed by Rich Black

This is Audiograph--the Bay Area’s sonic signature. 

Each week, we’ll play you a sound recorded somewhere in the Bay Area. Your job? Listen to the sound (in the player above), figure out where it was recorded, and what exactly it is, then call us to let us know.

If you think you can identify this Audiograph sound of the week, call 415-264-7106. Also, tell us where to record next. We’ll give away a KALW t-shirt every week to one lucky caller. 

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2:56pm

Fri February 22, 2013
It's All Politics

Sequester In South Carolina: A Tale Of Fighter Jets And Preschools

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 3:47 pm

Four F-16s from the 77th Fighter Squadron of Shaw Air Force Base fly over Darlington Raceway before a NASCAR race in Darlington, S.C., in May 2012.
Geoff Burke Getty Images for NASCAR

In Sumter, S.C., home of Shaw Air Force Base and the 20th Fighter Wing, cars sport bumper stickers that say, "Jet noise is the sound of freedom."

Throughout the day, F-16s on training runs blast from a runway on base, disappearing into the foggy sky. But if automatic, across-the-board federal spending cuts slated for March 1 go into effect, there will be a lot less of that sound.

"To cut to that level, we just could not pay for the amount of flying hours that we currently have," says Capt. Ann Blodzinski, the base's chief of public affairs.

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2:51pm

Fri February 22, 2013
World

After Long Isolation, Myanmar Now Has Suitors

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 3:47 pm

Engineers from China and Myanmar work to bury an oil pipeline outside the Myanmar city of Mandalay. Chinese media reports say the 700-mile-long oil and gas pipelines will be completed in May.
Anthony Kuhn NPR

For decades, Myanmar was isolated diplomatically, an economic backwater that seemed almost frozen in time amid a Southeast Asian region that was modernizing at a rapid pace.

But the political reforms under way in Myanmar, also known as Burma, are redefining its place in the world. President Obama's visit in November was a sign of the dramatic turnaround in relations with the United States.

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