1:12pm

Tue November 6, 2012
The Two-Way

After Driving On Sidewalk To Pass School Bus, Woman Must Wear 'Idiot' Sign

Caught in the act. Shena Hardin decided she wouldn't stop just because a school bus was pulled over. She went up on the sidewalk instead.
Fox8 Cleveland

"Justice has been served!" declares the man who helped police in Cleveland nab a woman who had been driving up on a sidewalk many mornings to get around a stopped school bus with children on board.

It's something 32-year-old Shena Hardin had done many times before, apparently, and for which a judge has now ordered her to wear a sign reading "Only an idiot would drive on the sidewalk to avoid the school bus."

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12:22pm

Tue November 6, 2012
It's All Politics

In Guam, 'Non-Binding Straw Poll' Gives Obama A Commanding Win

The polls in Guam have closed and the results are in.

President Obama managed a big victory, garnering 72 percent of the votes. That's about 23,067 votes compared to 8,443 votes for Gov. Mitt Romney.

Now for the disclaimers: Guam, 6,000 miles and 18 times zones away from California, is a territory of the United States, so their votes don't count. The presidential part of the vote is considered a "non-binding straw poll." But if you believe in bellweathers, listen up.

Here's what R. Todd Thompson of NPR member station KPRG in Guam told us:

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12:20pm

Tue November 6, 2012
The Salt

Restaurant Meals Mean More Calories And Soda For Kids And Teens

When they eat out at a restaurant, kids consume more calories than they do at home. Here, members of the Long Island Gulls hockey team enjoy a lunch at TGI Friday's back in 2007 in Marlborough, Mass.
Bruce Bennett Getty Images

Walk into a fast food restaurant and it's probably safe to assume that whatever deep-fried deliciousness you eat, you'll consume more calories than you would if you ate a well-rounded home cooked meal. That's common sense.

But, public health officials are sounding the alarm about the effect that eating out often – whether at fast food or full service restaurants – is having on our diets, especially in children.

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11:35am

Tue November 6, 2012
The Two-Way

Russia's Putin Sacks Defense Minister Amid Corruption Scandal

A Russian Army officer walks past Defence Ministry offices in Moscow, on Tuesday. Putin fired defence minister Anatoly Serdyukov over a corruption scandal, the most dramatic change to the government since he returned to the Kremlin for a third term.
Andrey Smirnov AFP/Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin today fired his defense minister, who is embroiled in a real estate corruption scandal.

The New York Times reports:

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11:16am

Tue November 6, 2012
Africa

All Aboard South Africa's High-Speed Train

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 5:37 pm

Passengers wait to board the Gautrain, Africa's first high-speed train, in Johannesburg, South Africa, Aug. 2, 2011. The train travels at speeds of up to 100 mph and makes commuting much easier for South Africans accustomed to congested roads and traffic jams.
Li Qihua Xinhua /Landov

Public transit in South Africa can be a bit of a nightmare. Many South Africans have had to depend on the ubiquitous taxivans, which are often overcrowded, dirty and driven recklessly.

But the continent's first rapid rail service, built to ease traffic congestion in South Africa's economic heart, is changing that.

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10:54am

Tue November 6, 2012
Author Interviews

Oliver Sacks, Exploring How Hallucinations Happen

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 9:58 am

Oliver Sacks is a physician, author and professor of neurology at NYU School of Medicine. He also frequently contributes to The New Yorker.
Elena Seibert Knopf

In Oliver Sacks' book The Mind's Eye, the neurologist included an interesting footnote in a chapter about losing vision in one eye because of cancer that said: "In the '60s, during a period of experimenting with large doses of amphetamines, I experienced a different sort of vivid mental imagery."

He expands on this footnote in his new book, Hallucinations, where he writes about various types of hallucinations — visions triggered by grief, brain injury, migraines, medications and neurological disorders.

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10:42am

Tue November 6, 2012
Open Air ~ 11/8/12

Tommy Tune ~ Michael Morgan ~ Barbara Oliver ~ Austin Forbord

Join host David Latulippe for a talk with Broadway legend Tommy Tune, local theatre royalty Barbara Oliver, Oakland East Bay Symphony music director Michael Morgan, and Austin Forbord who directed and produced the documentary “Stage Left:  A Story of Theater in San Francisco.”  Open Air:  Originally broadcast on Thursday 11/8/12 at 1pm.

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10:23am

Tue November 6, 2012
Shots - Health News

Drug-Resistant Malaria On The Rise In Southeast Asia

Daw Khin Twon, an undocumented immigrant from Burma, rests at home after receiving malaria treatment at the Mae Tao Clinic in Mae Sot, Thailand.
Ben de la Cruz NPR

For malaria in Southeast Asia, there's good news and bad news right now. Overall, the number of cases is down, but there's a growing problem of drug resistance in the cases that do crop up.

Researchers worry that superstrains of the parasite — strains immune to the most common medications — could wipe out the recent progress against malaria.

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9:40am

Tue November 6, 2012
The Salt

Ready-To-Eat Meals Feed Thousands In Wake Of Superstorm Sandy

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 9:41 am

A young woman helps bag ready-to-eat meals for distribution to the residents of the Lower East Side who remain without power due to Superstorm Sandy on Friday.
John Minchillo AP

When we think of ready-to-eat meals, we usually think of those packets of nutrient-dense soldiers' rations, like the Army sandwich that stays fresh for two years. These pouches of food are typically deployed in the field, and are consequently designed to withstand the abuses of temperature and time that would destroy fresh fare.

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9:30am

Tue November 6, 2012
It's All Politics

Voting Issues: Long Lines In Florida, Confusion In New Jersey

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 1:18 pm

Voters line up to cast a ballot in Crawfordville, Fla.
Mark Wallheiser Getty Images

As the voting day has progressed, we've seen some reports of irregularities.. Throughout the day, we'll be surveying our reporters and other news organizations and keep track of significant irregularities in this post.

So far, the big problem has been long lines. Some voters have had to wait hours in line to cast their ballot in battleground states like Florida and Virginia and those affected by Superstorm Sandy like New York.

We'll start with Florida:

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