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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

This will just have to count as one of the wonders of nature. A Michigan power plant dumps a lot of warm water into Lake Erie. The warm water attracts fish. The fish attract bald eagles. Almost 200 of them have been nesting at the DTE Energy plant. It is not so easy for people to gain access to the massive plant. So the company holds an annual lottery for bird watchers who want to see our national bird in its 21st century habitat.

Ole Miss Civil Rights Statue Vandalized

Feb 19, 2014

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The FBI is now part of the investigation at the University of Mississippi where someone draped a Confederate-style old Georgia flag and tied a noose around the statue of James Meredith. That statue commemorates the enrollment of the first black student at Ole Miss in 1962, which led to riots. Sandra Knispel, of Mississippi Public Broadcasting, reports.

The Michael Dunn case is of a type that we see with harrowing regularity. An unarmed black man is shot and killed by a police officer or a white person. The shooter says he felt threatened.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Wednesday it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

And I'm Renee Montagne. President Obama arrives in Mexico today to meet with Mexico's president and Canada's prime minister. It's been dubbed the meeting of the Three Amigos. The one day summit of North America's leaders will focus on trade and commerce, but also on the agenda: security, energy, border issues and immigration. NPR's Carrie Kahn is in Toluca near Mexico City, where the summit begins later today. Good morning.

When Kwagne Elian came down with a high fever, the young woman in Cameroon did what many of us would do in the United States: She went to a private health clinic in her neighborhood.

But unlike the clinic at the local CVS here in the U.S., the one Elian goes to is illegal. And it's the target of a crackdown by the government.

Is Tyson Foods' Chicken Empire A 'Meat Racket'?

Feb 19, 2014

Christopher Leonard's new exposé on the chicken industry, The Meat Racket, doesn't devote much ink to the physical object on our plate, the chicken meat itself.

Los Angeles may be known for its celebrities, glitz and glam, but the city's mayor, Eric Garcetti, is focused on something decidedly less flashy: infrastructure.

Take the city's airport LAX, for example. You'd be forgiven for mistaking its terminals for a cramped bus station. And stepping out onto the curb can feel like an assault on the senses, with the horns, aggressive shuttle drivers and travelers jostling for taxis.

Coffee is important to many of us, but let's say your coffee maker breaks. Finding a new one is as easy as typing "shop coffee maker" into your browser. Voila — you've got models, prices and customer reviews at your fingertips.

But say you need something less fun than a coffee maker — like a colonoscopy. Shopping for one of those is a lot harder. Actual prices for the procedure are almost impossible to find, and Bob Kershner says there's huge variation in cost from one clinic to the next.

On today’s Your Call, we’ll discuss how colleges are hiring part-time teachers to save costs, and what impact it has on education. Adjunct teachers now make up 50 percent of higher education faculty. Many receive no benefits and are paid poorly, with no chance of job-security or tenure. What happens to students when their teachers are contractors, not full-time professionals? And how are adjuncts organizing for change? Join the conversation on the next Your Call, with Holly Kernan and you.

 

  

A Crosscurrents Special on the drought! How can we save waters as individuals? Does it even matter, considering that agriculture uses about 78% of the state's water? Pacific Institute President Peter Gleick will tell us!

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