3:00am

Thu February 7, 2013
NPR Story

African Peacekeepers Used To Battling Insurgents

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 12:07 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's get a glimpse of the troops now fighting Islamist insurgents in Somalia. Forces from multiple African nations have been battling a group called al-Shabaab for years. They're being closely watched now because the international community is considering how to intervene in future months and years against an insurgency in Mali. NPR's Gregory Warner is traveling with a force in Somalia. Gregory, welcome back to the program.

GREGORY WARNER, BYLINE: Thanks, Steve.

INSKEEP: So where are you, and what have you been doing?

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1:35am

Thu February 7, 2013
Folk Music & Beyond Sat. 3 pm

Arhoolie's 50th Celebration

Chris Strachwitz with the Treme Band in Berkeley
Credit Sandy Miranda

Join host Sandy Miranda on Folk Music & Beyond this Saturday, 3-5pm for a record release party with Chris Strachwitz, Laurie Lewis, and surprise guests.  Chris' label Arhoolie Records celebrated its 50th anniversary last year with three special concerts in Berkeley.  A new 4-cd set has just been released featuring highlights from these concerts with Ry Cooder Taj Mahal The Savoy-Doucet Cajun Band Santiago Jimenez, Jr. Laurie Lewis Creole Bells Peter Rowan Suzy & Eric Thompson Barbara Dane & Bob Mielke's Jazz All Stars, and Maria Muldaur.

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12:39am

Thu February 7, 2013
Europe

Privatization Of Greek Assets Runs Behind Schedule

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 12:07 pm

Employees of Hellenic Postbank protest during a strike against the bank's privatization in Athens, in December.
John Kolesidis Reuters/Landov

In exchange for multibillion-euro bailouts, Greece was required to sell state-owned assets. But the sweeping privatization process is behind schedule. In addition, European governments are nervous that Chinese, Russian and Arab companies are lining up to take advantage of the Greek fire sale.

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12:34am

Thu February 7, 2013
Planet Money

'Give Me The Money Or I'll Shoot The Trees'

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 12:07 pm

Pay up, or the bird gets it. (A hoatzin perches on a branch in Yasuni National Park.)
Pablo Cozzaglio AFP/Getty Images

Ecuador's Yasuni National Park is one of the most diverse ecosystems on Earth. But there's a complication: The park sits on top of the equivalent of millions of barrels of oil.

This creates a dilemma.

Ecuador prides itself on being pro-environment. Its constitution gives nature special rights. But Ecuador is a relatively poor country that could desperately use the money from the oil.

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12:31am

Thu February 7, 2013
Shots - Health News

Silica Rule Changes Delayed While Workers Face Health Risks

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 12:07 pm

A worker makes a cut in the side of a sandstone block at the Cleveland Quarries facility in Vermilion, Ohio, earlier this month. The legal limit on the amount of silica that workers can inhale was set decades ago.
Ty Wright Bloomberg via Getty Images

One of the oldest known workplace dangers is breathing in tiny bits of silica, which is basically sand. Even the ancient Greeks knew that stone cutters got sick from breathing in dust. And today, nearly 2 million American workers are exposed to silica dust in jobs ranging from construction to manufacturing.

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12:27am

Thu February 7, 2013
Puerto Rico: A Disenchanted Island

'Don't Give Up On Us': Puerto Ricans Wrestle With High Crime

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 5:31 pm

Luis Romero looks out over the ocean to a view that includes the Coast Guard station where his son, Julian, was in the auxiliary. Romero started the anti-violence organization Basta Ya after Julian was murdered.
Coburn Dukehart NPR

Puerto Rico's population is declining. Faced with a deteriorating economy, increased poverty and a swelling crime rate, many Puerto Ricans are fleeing the island for the U.S. mainland. In a four-part series, Morning Edition explores this phenomenon, and how Puerto Rico's troubles are affecting its people and other Americans in unexpected ways.

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12:11am

Thu February 7, 2013

7:40pm

Wed February 6, 2013
National Security

Obama's Pick For CIA Chief To Face Senate Scrutiny

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 12:07 pm

John Brennan, the deputy national security adviser for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, speaks at the White House in January. Brennan is President Obama's choice for CIA director.
Carolyn Kaster AP

John Brennan, President Obama's choice to lead the CIA, can look forward to a grilling Thursday on Capitol Hill. As Obama's chief counterterrorism adviser, he has been associated with some controversial policies, including the use of armed drones. Brennan's nomination comes before the Senate Intelligence Committee, and members from both parties have their questions ready.

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6:02pm

Wed February 6, 2013
Crosscurrents

Crosscurrents: February 6, 2013

Where homosexuality and Mormonism collide; Washington High School students on being "American;" Growing up trans; and "local" (Baltimore) legend David Byrne.

To subscribe to the Crosscurrents podcast in iTunes, click here. To use another podcasting tool, click here.

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5:54pm

Wed February 6, 2013
Arts & Culture

Where homosexuality and Mormonism collide

The intersection of gay rights and Mormon religion at a Mormons for Marriage Equality in Portland, Oregon.
Under CC license from Flickr user A.Davey

Recently on Crosscurrents, we aired a profile of Oakland’s Mormon Temple – an aesthetic icon in the city – and a place that’s very special to a man who was married there.

“Also, it is a place where a temple marriage can be performed, a marriage performed in a Mormon temple is not said to be ‘til’ death do you part, but also to carry on into the eternities,” Jay Pimentel said in the piece.

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