4:02am

Fri October 12, 2012
Europe

French Woman Owed Huge Telephone Bill

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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2:09am

Fri October 12, 2012
The Two-Way

The European Union Wins The 2012 Nobel Peace Prize

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 3:01 am

European Union flag and Greek flag wave in front of the Acropolis, in central Athens.
Andreas Solaro AFP/Getty Images

The Norwegian Nobel Committee has bestowed its prestigious Peace Prize upon the European Union for what it says is a six decade contribution "to the advancement of peace and reconciliation, democracy and human rights in Europe"

In its press conference, the committee said the union cemented peace between France and Germany and shows that "through well-aimed efforts and by building up mutual confidence, historical enemies can become close partners."

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1:32am

Fri October 12, 2012
Business

Pentagon Revising Cyber Rules Of Engagement

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 2:36 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with rules of engagement.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: Last night, Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta issued these words of warning: foreign cyber actors - he said - are probing America's critical infrastructure networks.

As NPR's Larry Abramson reports, Panetta says the Pentagon is revising its cyber rules of engagement, so it can respond to those attacks.

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1:23am

Fri October 12, 2012
World

Nobel Peace Prize Winner Announced Friday

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 2:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Next, let's follow up on today's surprise winner of the Nobel Peace Prize. In effect, it went to most of a continent, the European Union. The Norwegian Nobel Committee said it was a decision that was long overdue considering the EU's role in advancing and maintaining peace since World War II. Here's the chairman of the Nobel Committee, Thorbjoern Jagland.

THORBJOERN JAGLAND: The stabilizing part played by the European Union has helped to transform most of Europe from a continental war to a continental peace.

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1:23am

Fri October 12, 2012
Election 2012

No. 2s, Biden, Ryan, Square Off In Combative Debate

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 2:36 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Last night's vice presidential debate offered a reminder about American politics. It can be infuriating, misleading and irrelevant, but at its best politics becomes a spectacle - a highly informative show - which is what the vice presidential candidates delivered last night in a debate in Kentucky.

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1:23am

Fri October 12, 2012
Business

Survey: 1-In-10 'Dual-Screened' Presidential Debate

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 3:37 am

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1:06am

Fri October 12, 2012
Politics

Today on Your Call: Media Roundtable with Andrea Seabrook & Michael Massing

On today's Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week we’ll have a conversation with Andrea Seabrook, former Capital Hill reporter for NPR. She says reporters need to stop coddling lawmakers, stop buying their red team, blue team narrative and ask harder questions of them. We’ll also talk about campaign coverage with the New York Review of Books Michael Massing. Where did you the best reporting this week? Join us live at 10 PDT or send an leave a comment here. It’s Your Call, with Matt Martin and you.

Guests:

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12:25am

Fri October 12, 2012
The Salt

Making 'The Science Of Good Cooking' Look Easy

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 2:36 am

Want a better-tasting gazpacho? Don't toss out the tomato seeds.
Carl Tremblay Photography America's Test Kitchen

Ever wondered why you're not supposed to bake with cold eggs or whether marinating really tenderizes meat? Read on.

America's Test Kitchen host Chris Kimball "whisks away" some cooking myths as he talks with Morning Edition host Renee Montagne about the book he wrote, The Science of Good Cooking, with fellow Cook's Illustrated magazine editors. Being the science and cooking geeks that we are, we tuned in.

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12:25am

Fri October 12, 2012
Africa

Forest People Return To Their Land ... As Tour Guides

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 8:55 pm

In 1991, the Batwa forest people of Uganda were evicted from their land when two national parks were created to protect the shrinking habitat of the endangered mountain gorilla. A new program is trying to help them earn money and reconnect with their roots.
Mackenzie Knowles-Coursin for NPR

Like other hunter-gatherers of Central Africa who've been cast out of their jungle homes, when the Batwa forest people of southwest Uganda lost their forest, they lost their identity.

The Batwa were evicted from their rain forest kingdom in 1991, when two neighboring national parks, Mgahinga and Bwindi, were created to protect shrinking habitat for the endangered mountain gorilla.

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12:23am

Fri October 12, 2012
The Salt

Kelp For Farmers: Seaweed Becomes A New Crop In America

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 8:02 am

Oyster fisherman Bren Smith on his boat, The Mookie. Smith decided to try his hand at seaweed farming, collaborating with ecology professor Charles Yarish.
Ron Gautreau Courtesy of Bren Smith

A new kind of crop is being planted in the United States, and it doesn't require any land or fertilizer. Farming it improves the environment, and it can be used in a number of ways. So what is this miracle cash crop of the future?

It's seaweed.

Charlie Yarish, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Connecticut, loves seaweed. In nature, he says, when seaweed turns a rich chocolate color, that means the plant is picking up nitrogen, a process called nutrient bioextraction.

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