12:36am

Fri January 18, 2013
Animals

Figuring How to Pay For (Chimp) Retirement

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 7:06 pm

Hannah and Marty eat watermelon snacks at the Save the Chimps sanctuary.
Save the Chimps

Retirees flock to Florida — and the Sunshine State even has a retirement home for chimpanzees.

There, chimps live in small groups on a dozen man-made islands. Each 3-acre grassy island has palm trees and climbing structures, and is surrounded by a moat.

This is Save the Chimps, the world's biggest sanctuary for chimps formerly used in research experiments or the entertainment industry, or as pets. The chimps living here — 266 of them — range in age from 6 years old to over 50. And as sanctuary Director Jen Feuerstein drives around in a golf cart, she recognizes each one.

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12:34am

Fri January 18, 2013
Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond

Experts Urge Caution As $50 Billion In Sandy Aid Passes House

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 6:11 am

Much of the money from the Hurricane Sandy relief bill the House of Representatives passed will fund beach and infrastructure restoration projects in areas such as Mantoloking, N.J., seen on Oct. 31.
Doug Mills AP

The House of Representatives passed a bill this week to spend $50 billion to help states struck by Hurricane Sandy. The action comes more than two months after the storm, and the measure now goes to the Senate.

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12:32am

Fri January 18, 2013
It's All Politics

Latino Voters Urge Obama To Keep Immigration Promise

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 6:35 am

Latino voters were a key to President Obama's victory in November, turning out in big numbers and supporting Obama by more than 2 to 1 over Republican Mitt Romney.

Now, many of those voters say it's time for Obama to do something he did not do in his first term: push hard for and sign a comprehensive immigration overhaul.

Let's start with a group of Latinos — young and old, some U.S. citizens, some not — heading from Florida to Washington, D.C., for Obama's inauguration and for meetings with members of Congress. As caravans go, it's a small one: 13 people in two vans.

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12:31am

Fri January 18, 2013
StoryCorps

The Moment Race Mattered: A Haunting Childhood Memory

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 6:11 am

Bernard Holyfield (right) shares a childhood story with his friend Charles Barlow, about growing up in a racially charged Alabama during the early 1960s.
StoryCorps

When Bernard Holyfield was 5 years old, he was the proud owner of a dog named Lassie, a collie who closely resembled the namesake fictional dog on television.

"And we used to always keep Lassie tied up at the house with a chain, kind of like our protector," Holyfield explains to his friend Charles Barlow, 63, for StoryCorps at the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site in Atlanta.

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12:00am

Fri January 18, 2013
Your Call

Your Call: Friday Media Roundtable

Courtesy of flickr.com/photos/notionscapital/

On today's Your Call, it’s our Friday media roundtable. This week, we’ll discuss coverage of the elections in Israel. We’ll also be joined by journalist, Trevor Aaronson, to discuss his new book, The Terror Factory: Inside the FBI's manufactured War on Terrorism. Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org. Where did you see the best reporting this week? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

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5:59pm

Thu January 17, 2013
Arts & Culture

History isn’t a turnoff – if it’s properly presented

Photo by Lisa Hamilton Courtesy of www.realrural.org/

My first award at school was for history, in fifth grade. I didn’t even know you could win awards for history, but I was pleased to get it. This early inclination has always made me wonder why many people find history to be boring. Personally, I always enjoyed learning about the individual events and the individual people behind those events. Now I realize that much of history is presented more like a math problem than a story – i.e., “When did the Panama Canal open?”

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5:34pm

Thu January 17, 2013
Economy/Labor/Biz

The haves and have-nots of San Francisco's mid-Market district

Twitter headquarters in San Francisco's Mid Market district

The mid-Market district of San Francisco is undergoing tremendous change. Construction cranes literally cast shadows over the businesses and charities serving long-time residents of the neighborhood. This is an area filled with supported housing and Single Room Occupancy hotels. Homeless people and panhandlers traverse the wide sidewalks. One of the food pantries that serves them is run by The Quaker Meeting House. It’s on 9th Street, just south of Market, and has been around for nearly 20 years. To date, Twitter has run its global operations around the corner for about half-a-year. Which means these two entities with similar sounding names and strikingly different purposes are unlikely neighbors.

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5:25pm

Thu January 17, 2013
Crosscurrents

Crosscurrents: January 17, 2013

The Haves and Have-Nots of San Francisco's Mid-Market; The California Historical Society experiments with a new concept in how we explore the past;  and the very first Audiograph solution!

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3:10pm

Thu January 17, 2013
Environment

Understanding Climate Change, With Help From Thoreau

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 9:35 am

Researchers in Massachusetts and Wisconsin are comparing modern flower blooming data with notes made by Henry David Thoreau and Aldo Leopold. The sight of irises blooming during a Boston winter helped spur the research.
Darlyne A. Murawski Getty Images/National Geographic Creative

Modern scientists trying to understand climate change are engaged in an unlikely collaboration — with two beloved but long-dead nature writers: Henry David Thoreau and Aldo Leopold.

The authors of Walden and A Sand County Almanac and last spring's bizarrely warm weather have helped today's scientists understand that the first flowers of spring can continue to bloom earlier, as temperatures rise to unprecedented levels.

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3:10pm

Thu January 17, 2013
Crisis In The Housing Market

Homebuilding Is Booming, But Skilled Workers Are Scarce

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 3:29 pm

New homebuilding reached a 4 1/2 year high in December, welcome news for an industry that lost 2 million jobs during the downturn. Despite those job losses, the sector is experiencing a labor shortage in some parts of the U.S.
Tony Dejak AP

The construction industry in the U.S. is staging a comeback. In one indicator, the Commerce Department announced Thursday that new homebuilding has reached its highest level in 4 1/2 years.

While that's a promising sign for the industry, more than 2 million construction jobs have been lost in the sector since employment hit its peak. While some might expect that means plenty of people are ready to fill the new jobs, many markets around the country are actually experiencing a shortage of construction workers.

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