1:25pm

Mon October 8, 2012
It's All Politics

Romney's Debate Performance Swings Polls In His Favor

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 7:10 pm

Mitt Romney and President Obama wave to the audience during the first presidential debate at the University of Denver, on Wednesday.
David Goldman AP

In the five days since Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney was declared by many the winner of the first presidential debate, political watchers have waited to see if polls would shift in response to his performance. And, they did.

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1:22pm

Mon October 8, 2012
Community Partnership

Litquake 2012 - KRAWL with KALW

Litquake, San Francisco's Literary Festival, takes place for the 13th time October 5-13.  The festival features 163 events and more than 850 authors, and the closing night Lit Crawl, the world’s largest free literary crawl. 

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1:21pm

Mon October 8, 2012
Around the Nation

In Pumpkin Regatta, It's Toothy Grins All Around

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 5:37 pm

Peter Geiger lines up before the start of the pumpkin race in Damariscotta, Maine.
Patty Wight Maine Public Radio

The typical jack-o'-lanterns that don front stoops this time of year pale in comparison to their multihundred-pound brethren: the giant pumpkin. Every year in Damariscotta, Maine, people hollow them out, climb inside and race them in the annual pumpkin regatta. There are two divisions — paddleboat and powerboat — and thousands gather to see whether it will be sink or swim for the contestants.

Topher Mallory bolts a wooden frame onto the flesh of his 550-pound pumpkin powerboat. The stern is large enough to mount a 10 horsepower engine — double that of most competitors.

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10:10am

Mon October 8, 2012
NPR Story

Tig Notaro On Going 'Live' About Her Life

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 9:41 am

Comedian Tig Notaro dealt with a cancer diagnosis the best way she knew how — with humor.
tignation.com

"Good evening, hello. I have cancer. How are you?"

That's how comedian Tig Notaro began her set at Largo in Los Angeles the day she was diagnosed with Stage 2 breast cancer. As she uttered those words to the audience, there was nervous laughter, weeping and total silence in response.

Comedian Louis C.K. was there that evening, and tweeted this about her performance: "In 27 years doing this, I've seen a handful of truly great, masterful standup sets. One was Tig Notaro last night at Largo."

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10:10am

Mon October 8, 2012
NPR Story

Louis C.K.'s Diagnosis: 'Masterful'

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 7:15 pm

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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9:39am

Mon October 8, 2012
NPR Story

PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 10:58 am

His new film The Master stars Philip Seymour Hoffman as a leader of a cult and Joaquin Phoenix as his follower. Anderson's other films include There Will Be Blood, Magnolia and Boogie Nights.

9:39am

Mon October 8, 2012
NPR Story

"Joseph Anton"

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 10:58 am

Critic-at-large John Powers has some thoughts on the British author and the publication of his new memoir, Joseph Anton, a chronicle of his time in hiding.

9:39am

Mon October 8, 2012
NPR Story

STEPHEN COLBERT

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 8:20 am

The host of The Colbert Report returns to Fresh Air to talk about his new book, America Again: Re-becoming the Greatness We Never Weren't.

6:14am

Mon October 8, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Nobel Winners Unlocked Cells' Unlimited Potential

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 12:28 pm

Shinya Yamanaka from Kyoto University was named the winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for discovering how mature, adult cells can be reprogrammed into immature stem cells.
Shizuo Kambayashi Associated Press

The two scientists who won this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine discovered that cells in our body have the remarkable ability to reinvent themselves. They found that every cell in the human body, from our skin and bones to our heart and brain, can be coaxed into forming any other cell.

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5:03am

Mon October 8, 2012
The Salt

Honey, The Americans Shrank The Apple Trees

American apple growers realized that if they used dwarfing rootstocks and planted their trees closer together, they could increase their harvest of apples per acre by 200 to 300 percent.
Catalin Petolea iStockphoto.com

When Zarrina Mulloboeva got invited to go apple picking the other day, she thought it would be a taste of home. She's an exchange student from Tajikistan, in central Asia — a country close to the ancestral homeland of apples. Her uncle has a small orchard. In fact, when Mulloboeva came to the United States six weeks ago, she brought with her a large bottle of homemade dried apple slices.

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