2:31pm

Wed October 10, 2012
Religion

Sisters And Vatican II: A Generational Tug Of War

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 2:37 pm

A nun chants while she and her sisters pray together during Vespers at their home near Dumfries, Va. Unlike older sisters shaped by Vatican II, a new generation of women are flocking to more conservative orders.
Barbara Bradley Hagerty NPR

Fifty years ago, Pope John XXIII launched a revolution in the Catholic Church. The Second Vatican Council opened on Oct. 11, 1962, with the goal of bringing the church into the modern world. Catholics could now hear the Mass in their local language. Laypeople could take leadership roles in the church. And the church opened conversations with other faiths.

For American nuns, Vatican II brought freedoms and controversies that are playing out today.

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2:31pm

Wed October 10, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Romney's Remarks On Abortion Cause Stir

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 6:22 am

Mitt Romney's comments on abortion have surprised those on both sides of the issue.
Evan Vucci AP

Just how many abortion positions does Mitt Romney have? Once again, that answer is unclear.

This time the confusion began Tuesday, during a meeting with the editorial board of the Des Moines Register.

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2:24pm

Wed October 10, 2012
The Two-Way

A Rare Case: Canadian Navy Officer Pleads Guilty To Selling Secrets To Russians

Sub.-Lt. Jeffrey Delisle is escorted into Nova Scotia provincial court in Halifax in June.
Mike Dembeck AP

Canada is not used to high profile spy cases. But today there is news that the country has tried its first successful case using the Security of Information Act. And it's quite the case.

The CBC reports that a Navy sub lieutenant pleaded guilty to selling secrets to Russia. Canadian Forces Sub-Lt. Jeffrey Paul Delisle, the CBC reports, simply walked into the Russian Embassy in Ottawa and offered to work for them.

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2:09pm

Wed October 10, 2012
It's All Politics

'I Was Just Too Polite,' Says Obama, Vowing To Hit Hard At Next Debate

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 2:44 pm

President Obama promised to take it to Mitt Romney in future debates.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

No more Mr. Nice Guy. That was essentially what President Obama told Tom Joyner, the black-radio megahost, to expect at upcoming presidential debates.

On Wednesday, the president explained that his main mistake at last week's debate with Republican challenger Mitt Romney was an excess of gentility.

Obama's self-critique, such as it was, came in response to a Joyner question:

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1:49pm

Wed October 10, 2012
The Two-Way

JPMorgan Chase CEO: 'I Should Have Caught' $5.8 Billion Error

JP Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon, wearing a dark suit possibly made of sackcloth, didn't hold back when discussing the derivative trades that led to massive losses for his company.

"We made a stupid error," he said before a lunchtime audience at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington on Wednesday. "We screwed up."

Then he got more specific: "I should have caught it ... I didn't."

The company estimates it lost $5.8 billion, thanks to a London-based trader, nicknamed the "London whale," who took large, risky positions in credit derivatives.

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1:38pm

Wed October 10, 2012
It's All Politics

Romney, Obama Surrogates Clash Over Military Strategy

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 2:16 pm

The Romney campaign is putting more meat on the bones of its defense policy, and the result is a muscular, almost hawkish posture.

Dov Zakheim, Mitt Romney's special adviser for foreign policy and national security, went toe-to-toe with Richard Verma, who plays a similar role for the Obama campaign, at a forum Wednesday.

The two tussled for over an hour in a foreign policy debate of sorts at a Washington, D.C., hotel.

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1:15pm

Wed October 10, 2012
Religion

Why Is Vatican II So Important?

Pope Paul VI hands Orthodox Metropolitan Meliton of Heliopolis a decree during the December 1965 session of the Roman Catholic Ecumenical Council in Vatican City. The decree cancels excommunications that led to the break between the Roman and Orthodox churches nine centuries before.
AP

When Pope John XXIII announced the creation of the Second Vatican Council (also known as Vatican II) in January 1959, it shocked the world. There hadn't been an ecumenical council — an assembly of Roman Catholic religious leaders meant to settle doctrinal issues — in nearly 100 years.

"Many people maintained that with the definition of papal infallibility in 1870, councils were no longer needed. So it was a big surprise," Georgetown University professor Rev. John W. O'Malley says.

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12:40pm

Wed October 10, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

How Do Public Data About Heart Attack Treatment Change It?

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 4:38 am

Too risky to fix?
Clayton Hansen iStockphoto.com

Measurement has long been a cornerstone of quality improvement, whether it's on the factory floor or the hospital ward.

And making the quality scores of doctors and hospitals publicly available is central to the idea that health care can become a service that patients shop for intelligently. The results can also ratchet up professional peer pressure for improvement.

But does public reporting lead doctors and hospitals to game the system by withholding care from the sickest patients?

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12:25pm

Wed October 10, 2012
Economy/Labor/Biz

What Is it Really Like to be a Real Estate Agent Today and Tomorrow (airs 12/16/12)

A career in real estate is attractive to many people because of low barriers to entry, high potential income, and the pleasure of buying and selling homes.


Alas, the reality isn't that simple today, and especially tomorrow. But I'll talk with a guy who's the savviest and straightest-shooting real estate broker I know: George Mantor.  I really think it's going to be a fascinating and helpful interview.

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12:22pm

Wed October 10, 2012
It's All Politics

As Race Tightens, The Electoral Map Still Favors Obama

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 4:17 pm

A boy examines CSPAN's 2012 presidential race electoral map at the American Presidential Experience exhibit last month in Charlotte, N.C.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Mitt Romney may have seized the advantage in terms of poll numbers and momentum, but there's one area where President Obama enjoys the upper hand.

In the end, it's the only area that counts: the Electoral College. Over the past 20 years, Republicans have had a much lower ceiling when it comes to electoral support, while Democrats have had a significantly higher floor.

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