12:31am

Wed January 9, 2013
Law

Can Police Force Drunken Driving Suspects To Take Blood Tests?

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 10:32 am

A photographic screen hangs in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, which is undergoing renovations. On Wednesday, the justices will hear arguments in a case that asks whether police without a warrant can administer a blood test to a suspected drunken driver.
Greg E. Mathieson MAI/Landov

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Wednesday in a case testing whether police must get a warrant before forcing a drunken driving suspect to have his blood drawn.

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12:29am

Wed January 9, 2013
Education

Promoting Hinduism? Parents Demand Removal Of School Yoga Class

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 6:46 am

Third-graders at Olivenhain Pioneer Elementary School in Encinitas, Calif., perform chair pose with instructor Kristen McCloskey last month.
Kyla Calvert for NPR

During first period at Olivenhain Pioneer Elementary School in Encinitas, Calif., Kristen McCloskey leads about two dozen third-graders through some familiar yoga poses.

"All right, so let's do our opening sequence A," she says, instructing the kids. "Everyone take a big inhale, lift those arms up. Look up."

At the end of the half-hour class, 8-year-old Jacob Hagen says he feels energized and ready for the rest of the day. "Because you get to stretch out and it's good to be the first class because it wakes you up," he says.

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12:20am

Wed January 9, 2013
Asia

Become A Successful Chinese Bureaucrat, In 5 Easy Steps

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 5:16 pm

Former civil servant Wang Xiaofang is the author of 13 books on "bureaucracy literature," including The Civil Servant's Notebook, which recently was translated into English.
Louisa Lim NPR

Forget Fifty Shades of Grey. In China, "bureaucracy lit" is flying off bookstore shelves. With the books' stories of Machiavellian office politics, they're read avidly, both as entertainment and as how-to guides for aspiring civil servants.

So what is the secret to success in the corridors of power?

Here is a five-point guide to success, with tips gleaned from the pioneers of bureaucracy lit.

Lesson 1: Cultivate your connections.

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12:17am

Wed January 9, 2013
Sweetness And Light

Steroid Accusations Likely To Bench Baseball Hall Of Fame Candidates

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 3:26 am

Former Detroit Tigers pitcher Jack Morris throws out the ceremonial first pitch before Game 3 of the American League Championship Series between the Detroit Tigers and New York Yankees on Oct. 16. Morris is a candidate for the National Baseball Hall of Fame this year.
Paul Sancya AP

The results of this year's baseball Hall of Fame voting will be revealed on Wednesday.

Given the exit polling, it appears both Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens, as well as other candidates stained by accusations of steroid use, will not be admitted.

Among other reasons for not voting for them, I would suspect that accusations against Lance Armstrong for using performance-enhancing drugs in cycling is bound to have some carry-over effect. At a certain point, when the circumstantial evidence for drug use is so compelling, who can possibly believe these guys?

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12:00am

Wed January 9, 2013

10:45pm

Tue January 8, 2013

6:48pm

Tue January 8, 2013
SFUSD

Superintendents Message

Superintendents Message for January 08, 2013

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5:54pm

Tue January 8, 2013
HEAR HERE: A POP-UP RADIO PROJECT

Hear Here: Unexpected treasure at the Alemany Flea Market

The Alemany Flea Market is a San Francisco institution.  Every Sunday, vendors of useless knickknacks and pricey treasures set-up their wares in the dirt lot along Alemany Boulevard under the 280 underpass. And then they wait for the right buyer to come along. As part of our place profile series, KALW’s Penina Eilberg-Schwartz headed to the market to ask people about what this long-running market means to them.

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5:47pm

Tue January 8, 2013
Politics

"Micro apartments" make room for more San Francisco renters

Artist's Rendering of Smartspace Unit Courtesy of Panoramic Interests

We already know San Francisco’s housing market is tight and competition is fierce. A new city regulation hopes to make some more room in the housing market. Soon, current and aspiring San Franciscans will be able to live in “micro-apartments,” just 220 square feet each. City Supervisor Scott Wiener wrote the legislation making these hutches habitable. He talked about them with Crosscurrents Executive Editor, Ben Trefny.

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5:40pm

Tue January 8, 2013
Arts & Culture

99% Invisible: The most densely populated place on record

Walled City Night Views (from SW Corner), 1987.
Greg Girard

In 1898, China granted a 99-year lease to Great Britain for the areas across the harbor in the British controlled island of Hong Kong. But smack in the middle of that territory, known as Kowloon, was an enclave that wasn't included in the lease. A place that would, at least officially, still be controlled by the Chinese. It was a large fort, built decades earlier to put a check on British expansion. But it evolved into something very, very different. 

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