6:48pm

Tue January 8, 2013
SFUSD

Superintendents Message

Superintendents Message for January 08, 2013

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5:54pm

Tue January 8, 2013
HEAR HERE: A POP-UP RADIO PROJECT

Hear Here: Unexpected treasure at the Alemany Flea Market

The Alemany Flea Market is a San Francisco institution.  Every Sunday, vendors of useless knickknacks and pricey treasures set-up their wares in the dirt lot along Alemany Boulevard under the 280 underpass. And then they wait for the right buyer to come along. As part of our place profile series, KALW’s Penina Eilberg-Schwartz headed to the market to ask people about what this long-running market means to them.

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5:47pm

Tue January 8, 2013
Politics

"Micro apartments" make room for more San Francisco renters

Artist's Rendering of Smartspace Unit Courtesy of Panoramic Interests

We already know San Francisco’s housing market is tight and competition is fierce. A new city regulation hopes to make some more room in the housing market. Soon, current and aspiring San Franciscans will be able to live in “micro-apartments,” just 220 square feet each. City Supervisor Scott Wiener wrote the legislation making these hutches habitable. He talked about them with Crosscurrents Executive Editor, Ben Trefny.

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5:40pm

Tue January 8, 2013
Arts & Culture

99% Invisible: The most densely populated place on record

Walled City Night Views (from SW Corner), 1987.
Greg Girard

In 1898, China granted a 99-year lease to Great Britain for the areas across the harbor in the British controlled island of Hong Kong. But smack in the middle of that territory, known as Kowloon, was an enclave that wasn't included in the lease. A place that would, at least officially, still be controlled by the Chinese. It was a large fort, built decades earlier to put a check on British expansion. But it evolved into something very, very different. 

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5:36pm

Tue January 8, 2013
Health, Science, Environment

The luxury of living in a tiny house

Jay Shafer, owner of the Tumbleweed Tiny House Company, in front of one of his homes.

From a young age, many of us dream of the houses we’ll own. But those dreams don’t get into the reality of how much houses cost. These days, buying a house means getting a mortgage – which can wind up taking decades to pay off. And that’s if you keep from defaulting – defaults in the Golden State are more than double the national average.

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5:30pm

Tue January 8, 2013
Transportation

Listener feedback: More to the story on Uber

Back in December, we ran a story about Uber, the app that matches users to the closest town car or taxicab. Uber gets its money by charging its own rates, which can cost much more than a typical meter.

Listener Mark Gruberg called in to let us know that we missed something: that regular cabs are using apps, without the extra cost.

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4:15pm

Tue January 8, 2013
Crosscurrents

Crosscurrents: January 8, 2013

We're living small today: new legislation passed in San Francisco allows for the construction of tiny apartments, owning a tiny house, a trip to the Alemany Flea Market, a taxi cab correction on the company of Uber, and local musicians Shannon and the Clams.

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3:52pm

Tue January 8, 2013
The Salt

Farm Bill Critics Claim Partial Victory Despite Stalemate

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 7:20 am

Peanut plants grow on a Halifax, N.C., farm that received federal subsidies in 2011.
Robert Willett MCT /Landov

It's amazing how many different kinds of people have been trying to abolish or at least change the government's payments to farmers. They include economists, environmentalists, taxpayer advocates, global anti-hunger advocates and even a lot of farmers. Some have been fighting farm subsidies for the past 20 years.

This past year, those critics laid siege to offices on Capitol Hill because the law that authorizes these programs — the farm bill — was about to expire. (It has to be renewed every five years.)

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3:43pm

Tue January 8, 2013
Business

After The 'Fiscal Cliff,' Businesses Say Some Uncertainty Remains

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 4:23 pm

U.S. employers added 155,000 jobs in December, a steady gain that shows hiring held up during the tense negotiations to resolve the fiscal cliff. But the unemployment rate remained at 7.8 percent last month.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Businesses complained that the uncertainty surrounding the "fiscal cliff" froze their decisions about hiring and expanding, which hurt the economy. Washington has now managed half a deal, which settles tax issues, at least for the time being. But has that removed enough uncertainty to boost some business hiring and investment?

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3:43pm

Tue January 8, 2013
Environment

Deep In Canadian Lakes, Signs Of Tar Sands Pollution

The Shell Oil Jackpine open pit mine uses trucks that are 3 stories tall, weigh 1 million pounds and cost $7 million each. There is explosive growth in the oil field areas around Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada.
The Washington Post/Getty Images

Canadian researchers have used the mud at the bottom of lakes like a time machine to show that tar sands oil production in Alberta, Canada, is polluting remote regional lakes as far as 50 miles from the operations.

An increasingly large share of U.S. oil comes from Canada's tar sands. There are environmental consequences of this development, but until recently, Canadian regional and federal governments left it to the industry to monitor these effects.

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