7:03pm

Thu September 13, 2012
StoryCorps

From Topless Bar To Biology: A Love Story

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 8:56 am

Biologists Philip and Susan McClinton started their life together, in 1972, in a very different place.
StoryCorps

5:51pm

Thu September 13, 2012

5:50pm

Thu September 13, 2012
Health, Science, Environment

The Nanny State: Comparing Richmond's soda tax to California's anti-smoking campaign

As controversy rages regarding the government's right to regulate health, some have been quick to compare the ideas of government regulation to preventing obesity, to legislation against lung cancer and smoking. While  obesity and lung cancer are both health issues, research shows that they aren't as analogous as one might expect. Men who smoke a pack  of cigarettes per day have a relative risk of mortality nearly four times higher than the national average. The relative risk of mortality from obesity isn't even close to that; it's 1.5 times the average.

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5:25pm

Thu September 13, 2012
Politics

The Nanny State: a Libertarian's view on legislating lifestyles

Marcy Berry is the Vice Chair of the Libertarian Party of San Francisco. She spoke with KALW’s Isaac Silk about whether the government should be involved with legislating healthy lifestyles.

MARCY BERRY: No. Not at all, no at all times, no. It should be left up to parents to families to the people in charge. It’s not, in my opinion, up to the government to address such things.  So, say if someone is obese, why is that person obese? She shouldn’t eat that much. I have children; they’re not obese. So, I don’t expect the government to make them thin. I expect myself to guide them

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5:23pm

Thu September 13, 2012
Politics

The Nanny State: Richmond's mayor not afraid to take on 'Big Sugar'

Richmond Mayor Gayle McLaughlin
newamericamedia.org

Sixteen percent of people in Richmond live below the poverty line. The city has the highest rate of diabetes deaths in Contra Costa County. But it also has one of the nation’s most progressive mayors, Mayor Gayle McLaughlin.

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5:02pm

Thu September 13, 2012

4:46pm

Thu September 13, 2012
Politics

The Nanny State: a penny for your soda

If you ride BART to its northwestern terminus, you’ll find yourself at Macdonald Avenue and 19th Street, just a few blocks east of downtown Richmond. Macdonald is a four-lane street lined with restaurants, gas stations, and other retailers. I came here to find out how local business owners feel about the soda tax ballot initiative.

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4:05pm

Thu September 13, 2012
The Two-Way

Have Foreign Policy Questions? 'Weekend Edition' Will Try To Answer Them

Our friends at Weekend Edition are trying something different starting this weekend. They're calling on NPR reporters to answer some of your questions on different topics.

Here's how they explain it:

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3:41pm

Thu September 13, 2012
The Two-Way

Was The American Consulate Attack In Benghazi Planned?

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 3:54 pm

Broken furniture outside the U.S. consulate building in Benghazi on Thursday, following an attack on the building late on September 11.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

One of the biggest questions still outstanding about the attack on a United States consulate in Libya is whether it was planned or whether it was the result of a protest against a U.S.-made film that criticizes the Prophet Muhammad.

The attack killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens.

The bottom line is that nothing is firm. But NPR's Leila Fadel reports that Libya's Deputy Interior Minister, Wanis al Sharef, said this was a sophisticated two-prong attack.

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2:57pm

Thu September 13, 2012
The Two-Way

The First Amendment: Why The Muhammad Film Is Protected Speech

Protesters carry an American flag pulled down from the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt on Tuesday.
Nasser Nasser AP

The First Amendment guarantee of free speech is in the spotlight this week. If you haven't kept up, a U.S.-produced film depicting the Prophet Muhammad in a less than flattering way has inflamed the Arab world.

In a lot of ways, the story is showing how the sweeping nature of the First Amendment puts the United States at odds with most of the world.

That rift was perhaps most evident when you compare the statements of Egypt's Islamist President Mohamed Morsi and that of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

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