1:56am

Wed July 25, 2012
U.S.

Plant Pleads To Stay Afloat, But Army Says 'No Tanks'

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 2:39 pm

M1 Abrams tanks sit on the assembly line at a plant in Lima, Ohio, the only place where the tanks are manufactured. Plant and local officials fear the plant won't survive if the military temporarily halts new tank orders.
General Dynamics Land Systems

M1 Abrams battle tanks are the rock stars of military armor. They're made in only one place: Lima, Ohio. The Army says it's done ordering them, but Congress appears intent on spending millions for more, arguing that cutting production is bad for the economy and national security.

Read more

1:56am

Wed July 25, 2012
Afghanistan

Taliban's 'Summer Offensive' Heats Up In Afghanistan

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 5:12 am

A Spanish NATO soldier on patrol in Afghanistan. Insurgents in the country have been busier this summer than last, and more often than not, civilians are paying the price.
Sean Carberry NPR

NATO officials were hoping that insurgent activity in Afghanistan would taper off during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, but so far, insurgents appear to be pressing ahead with their summer offensive.

More than a dozen NATO troops and contractors have been killed since the beginning of Ramadan last Friday. In general, insurgents have been busier this summer than last, and more often than not, civilians are paying the price.

Read more

1:55am

Wed July 25, 2012
Joe's Big Idea

Summer Science: Clothes Keep You Cool, More Or Less

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 7:05 am

United States runner Kam Conley sheds layers to train for the Olympics in England on Monday. Less clothing means more evaporation, keeping athletes cooler.
Hussein Malla AP

The cool weather in London is good news for the Olympic athletes because their bodies won't need to put as much energy into cooling off.

But most of us aren't lucky enough to be headed to London, and we could use some help keeping cool.

When you get hot you sweat — but it's not enough to just sweat. To cool off, you need that sweat to evaporate. It's evaporation that drains the heat from your body.

Read more

1:54am

Wed July 25, 2012
Around the Nation

When The Ship Comes In To Brownsville, Rip it Up

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 2:41 pm

A ship cutter helps dismantle a ship at the Bay Bridge Texas recycling yard.
Michelle Lopez for NPR

This fall, the U.S. Navy will contract three Cold War-era aircraft carriers — the USS Forrestal, the USS Saratoga and the USS Constellation — for scrapping. Often called "supercarriers" owing to their massive size, the ships contain nearly 60,000 tons of steel and other metal each.

All three carriers are likely to be sent to the landlocked city of Brownsville, Texas, to be ripped apart.

Read more

1:51am

Wed July 25, 2012
Inside Rebel-Held Syria

In Syria's North, A Shadow State Emerges

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 6:10 pm

A Free Syrian Army solider mans a checkpoint in the northern town of Ariha, on the outskirts of Idlib, Syria, last month. In rural areas held by rebels, new institutions are cropping up to fill the void left by the receding Syrian state.
Khalil Hamra AP

Third of five parts

Tucked in the olive groves and rocky hills of northern Syria, the small village of Qurqanya doesn't seem like much.

Scratch the surface, though, and you realize that this is a hub for the revolution in northern Syria, where a kind of shadow state is forming.

As the Syrian state recedes, the people in this village and villages around it are filling in the blanks with their own institutions and, for better or for worse, their own ideas about how a country should be run.

Read more

1:51am

Wed July 25, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Track The Spread Of AIDS Across The Globe

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 12:04 pm

Nelson Hsu, Adam Cole NPR

Its expansion was frighteningly fast. A handful of cases were first recognized in the U.S. at the beginning of the 1980s, but AIDS was soon seen around the world.

By 1990, the world had a pandemic on its hands. In 1997, the peak of the epidemic, more than 3 million people became newly infected with HIV.

Read more

1:44am

Wed July 25, 2012
Law

Justice Scalia Disputes Accuracy Of 'Leak'

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 4:02 pm

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia spoke with NPR on Tuesday at the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, influential conservative and pugilistic dissenter, is challenging everything from a recent leak about Supreme Court deliberations, to conventional wisdom about the court and its history.

In a new book co-authored with Bryan Garner, Scalia spells out his judicial philosophy, and on Tuesday, the always voluble, charming and combative justice sat for a wide-ranging interview — about the book, his relationships on the court, and the recent leak alleging anger among the justices over the recent health care decision.

Read more

1:09am

Wed July 25, 2012
It's All Politics

Pa. Won't Use Voter Fraud Argument At Hearing Over ID Law

Originally published on Thu July 26, 2012 11:30 am

When Pennsylvania officials begin their defense of the state's new voter identification law in court Wednesday, they will do so after agreeing to abandon a central argument for why such laws are needed.

In a Pennsylvania court filing, the state says it has never investigated claims of in-person voter fraud and so won't argue that such fraud has occurred in the past. As a result, the state says, it has no evidence that the crime has ever been committed.

Read more

12:00am

Wed July 25, 2012
Life After Murder

Today on Your Call: How can someone who murders re-enter society?

On the next Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Nancy Mullane, author of Life After Murder: Five Men in Search of Redemption.  We’ll also speak with Jesse Reed, one of the men she profiles in her book.  The California state parole board only approved parole for 10 percent of murder cases last year.  Governor Jerry Brown then approved 80% of those.  So what does it take to be released?  And how should those who have killed re-integrate in society? Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org.  It’s Your Call with Holly Kern

Read more

7:03pm

Tue July 24, 2012
Sweetness And Light

From Obscurity To The Olympics Back To Obscurity

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 5:12 am

Know who this gymnast is? You will soon. Seventeen-year-old Jordyn Wieber will compete for the U.S. women's gymnastics team in the 2012 London Olympics.
Jeff Roberson AP

Why do we like the Olympics?

If somebody hadn't thought to start them up again 116 years ago, would ESPN have invented them to fill in summer programming?

I'm not being cranky. It's just that most of the most popular Olympic sports are the groundhog games. Swimming, gymnastics and track and field come out every four years, see their shadow and go right back underground where nobody pays any attention to them for another four years. Can you even name a gymnast?

Read more

Pages