12:28am

Thu October 11, 2012
Science

Software Calculates City-Specific Carbon Footprint

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 12:58 pm

Bedrich Benes and Michel Abdul-Massih

One way to measure greenhouse gases is simply to capture them at the source: You put an instrument on a smokestack, for example. Cities, however, are full of cars, buses, factories and homes that all use fuel or electricity. No one really knows how much carbon dioxide, the main greenhouse gas, comes from each.

Ecologist Kevin Gurney says he can find out.

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12:27am

Thu October 11, 2012
Media

Advice For Moderators: Keep Order, Out Of Spotlight

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 4:58 am

Moderator Jim Lehrer gestures before the presidential debate at the University of Denver last week. Moderators must finagle answers out of sometimes-dodgy politicians and keep control, all without seeming to get in the way.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

PBS' Jim Lehrer came in for widespread criticism last week for failing to control the first presidential debate. Now, moderator Martha Raddatz is confronting partisan criticism in the lead-up to Thursday night's vice presidential debate, the first and only direct confrontation between Republican Paul Ryan and Democrat Joe Biden.

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12:26am

Thu October 11, 2012
Europe

Vatican II: A Half-Century Later, A Mixed Legacy

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 5:23 am

Thousands of faithful Catholics carry torches in a procession in St. Peter's Square in Vatican City on Oct. 11, 1962, the opening day of the historic Second Vatican Council. Over a three-year period, more than 2,000 bishops from around the world issued 16 landmark documents, which championed a more inclusive, less hierarchical and open church.
Girolamo Di Majo AP

At Rome's Basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls, 50 years ago this week, the newly elected pontiff stunned the world by calling the first Catholic Church Council in nearly a century — the Second Vatican Council, or what's known as Vatican II.

Pope John XXIII called for the institution's renewal and more interaction with the modern world.

As a result of Vatican II, the Catholic Church opened its windows onto the modern world, updated the liturgy, gave a larger role to laypeople, introduced the concept of religious freedom and started a dialogue with other religions.

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12:26am

Thu October 11, 2012
It's All Politics

Presidential Candidates Set Their Sights On Colorado's Latinos

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 1:47 am

Betty Aragon (center), an Obama supporter, says she thinks Latinos support Democrats because of the party's position on immigration issues.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

For our series First and Main, Morning Edition is traveling to contested counties in swing states to find out what is shaping voters' decisions this election season. The latest trip took us to Larimer County, Colo.

The presidential race has become much tighter in recent days, and in Colorado, a recent poll puts Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney in the lead.

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12:25am

Thu October 11, 2012
Author Interviews

Emma Thompson Revives Anarchist 'Peter Rabbit'

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 8:57 am

In Emma Thompson's new book, Peter Rabbit decides he needs a change of scene to cure his mopey mood.
Eleanor Taylor Penguin Young Readers Group

Emma Thompson isn't just an Oscar-winning actress; she's also an Oscar-winning writer. Thompson authored the 1995 film adaptation of Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility, and now she's taken on another period project — reviving the classic children's book character Peter Rabbit.

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12:24am

Thu October 11, 2012
Fiscal Cliff Notes

Fiscal Cliff Could Hit Civilian Pentagon Workers First

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 11:23 am

A Marine Corp F-35B Joint Strike Fighter lands at Patuxent Naval Air Station in Maryland in 2011. Analysts say that if mandatory Pentagon budget cuts are imposed next year, fewer new planes could ultimately be ordered.
Cliff Owen AP

Unless Congress acts, the Defense Department faces some $55 billion in cuts after the first of the year. The cuts are part of what's known as sequestration — automatic across the board spending cuts to both defense and nondefense government spending set in motion by last year's debt-ceiling fight.

Salaries for uniformed personnel are the one major thing that's protected. Otherwise, it's about a 10 percent cut to everything from Pentagon civilian staff to the acquisition of multimillion-dollar aircraft, like the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.

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12:00am

Thu October 11, 2012
Native environmental activism

Today on Your Call: How are indigenous people struggling for environmental justice?


On today's Your Call, we’ll honor Indigenous People’s Day by speaking with native activists on the front lines of environmental battles.  From the tar sands in Canada, to coal mining at Black Mesa, to fracking, toxic waste, and deforestation-- native people are standing up for environmental justice in their communities.  Where do you see examples of this?  Join us at 10am Pacific or post a comment here.  What can we all learn learn from how native communities relate to the environment?  It’s Your Call with Rose Aguilar, and you.


Guests:

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5:21pm

Wed October 10, 2012
Politics

The latest on the Alan Blueford slaying and investigations of police misconduct

Photo by Jessica Lipsky of Oakland North

KALW's Holly Kernan checks in with East Bay Express co-editor Robert Gammon about the latest news, including a report on the Alameda County decision not to press criminal charges against the officer that shot 18-year-old Alan Blueford in Oakland.

ROBERT GAMMON: The Alameda County D.A. announced that they're not going to be charging Officer Masso. They concluded that they believe Officer Masso's account that he contends that when he shot the teen, that his life was in danger, so it was a justified shooting.

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5:05pm

Wed October 10, 2012
EAST BAY EXPRESS

East Bay Express: Berkeley at a crossroads

East Bay Express

On a recent weekday, Fourth Street between Bancroft and Allston ways in West Berkeley was mostly abandoned. Unlike the upscale stretch of shops and eateries on the other side of University Avenue, this section of Fourth Street, a former hub of West Berkeley's once bustling industrial and warehouse sector, is now an empty reminder of glory days gone by.

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5:03pm

Wed October 10, 2012
Crosscurrents

Crosscurrents: October 10, 2012

A conversation with the East Bay Express's Robert Gammon; Regreterature; Wonder Women: the Untold Story of America's Superheroines;  and local group Voices of Music.

To subscribe to the Crosscurrents podcast in iTunes, click here. To use another podcasting tool, click here.

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