4:21pm

Thu September 27, 2012
It's All Politics

Iowa Voters Who Are — Literally — Done With The Election

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 5:53 pm

Iowans vote Thursday at the Polk County Auditor's Office in Des Moines. Voters lined up before the doors opened at 8 a.m. to cast ballots. At least 200 people had arrived within the first hour.
Sarah McCammon Iowa Public Radio

Early in-person voting has begun in Iowa, the first swing state to open polling sites.

Residents of the battleground state can now vote in person at their local county auditors' offices or turn them in by mail. Some areas will offer additional satellite locations.

At the Polk County Auditor's office in downtown Des Moines Thursday morning, a line of voters stretched down the block as the door opened.

Peter Clay, 62, was among the many supporters of President Obama. He says he's volunteered for the campaign on his days off from his job as a zookeeper.

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4:15pm

Thu September 27, 2012
The Two-Way

Cheese-Smuggling Ring Is Brought Down In Canda

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 4:56 pm

Cheese that was smuggled into Canada may have brought profits of more than $165,000, according to police. Pizzerias were reportedly a main market for the criminals, who were arrested this week.
Alex Wong Getty Images

A "large scale Canada-U.S. cheese smuggling operation" has been brought down, after an international investigation tracked criminals who were skirting import duties and Canada's higher cheese prices.

"The investigation revealed over $200,000 worth of cheese and other products were purchased and distributed for an estimated profit of over $165,000," Niagara police said.

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3:59pm

Thu September 27, 2012
The Two-Way

Man Behind Anti-Muslim Film Arrested For Violating Terms Of Probation

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 8:54 pm

A federal judge in Los Angeles has ordered the man behind the anti-Islamic video that is believed to have sparked deadly protests in the Muslim world to be detained.

The Associated Press reports that U.S. Central District Chief Magistrate Judge Suzanne Segal ordered Nakoula Basseley Nakoula held Thursday afternoon. He was deemed a flight risk.

Our original post continues:

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3:17pm

Thu September 27, 2012
It's All Politics

In 1980s Romney Video From His Bain Days, Profits, Not Jobs, Were Focus

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 3:30 pm

From the magazine that brought you the infamous, secretly recorded "47 percent" video comes a new one about Republican candidate Mitt Romney — this one offering a very different objective for Bain Capital than the one he brags about on the campaign trail.

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2:56pm

Thu September 27, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Disease Detectives Catch Deadly African Virus Just As It Emerges

New viruses are popping up all over these days – Heartland virus in Missouri last month, a new virus in the same family as SARS in Saudi Arabia this month. And now, a never-before-seen hemorrhagic fever virus in central Africa.

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2:55pm

Thu September 27, 2012
NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century

Aurora, Colo., Tries To Capitalize On Its Ethnic Riches

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 10:00 am

Families in a predominantly Latino youth soccer league gather for matches in Aurora. Hispanics make up nearly a third of the city's population, according to the 2010 Census.
Megan Verlee for NPR

Aurora, Colo., became a familiar name this summer, in the wake of a mass shooting at a local movie theater.

But there's much more to this Denver suburb than the recent tragedy. Just ask Ethiopian immigrant Fekade Balcha. Balcha's apartment, on Aurora's north side, sits in a dense neighborhood of squat brick apartment buildings and tiny homes.

"You see, in our apartment, there are Russians, Mexicans, Africans," Balcha says. "From Ethiopia, Somalia, Nigeria, and something like that."

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2:42pm

Thu September 27, 2012
The Two-Way

Renoir Found At Flea Market May Be Real, But It's Also Stolen

This weekend's auction of a flea-market find that turned out to be a work by French Impressionist master Pierre-Auguste Renoir has been put on hold, after evidence turned up the painting had been pilfered from a Baltimore museum decades ago.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Turns out there's a bigger story behind the Renoir painting purchased for $7 a couple of years ago at a West Virginia flea market — a mystery, and an alleged theft, in fact.

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2:32pm

Thu September 27, 2012
The Two-Way

Skaters Detail Abuse And Sabotage Allegations As Racing Season Begins

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 2:18 pm

Simon Cho of the U.S. celebrates during the 500 meter men's final race at the Short Track Speed Skating World Cup in Dresden in 2011.
Jens Meyer AP

More than the ice is frosty at the Olympic Oval outside Salt Lake City this week, as short track speedskaters begin the 2012-2013 season.

U.S. skaters are split over allegations of abuse leveled against two coaches and a claim that one coach ordered the sabotage of a Canadian competitor's skates at an international competition last year.

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2:29pm

Thu September 27, 2012
It's All Politics

A Second, Chance Interview With Subject Of Controversial First Lady Remarks

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 3:17 pm

Mitt Romney speaks Thursday at American Legion Post 176 in Springfield, Va.
Alex Wong Getty Images

During the Republican National Convention last month, I traveled with Mitt Romney's campaign from Tampa, Fla., to the American Legion conference in Indianapolis.

Romney delivered a speech about foreign affairs and national security. Among the thousands of attendees from around the country, I interviewed one woman from Virginia whose quote sparked a conversation among NPR's audience and staff.

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2:24pm

Thu September 27, 2012
Around the Nation

Despite Record Drought, Farmers Expect Banner Year

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 9:39 am

With far less than half of their normal corn yield, the Ulrich brothers are relying in part on government-subsidized crop insurance to keep their farm afloat.
Frank Morris KCUR

After one of the driest summers on record, recent rains have helped in some parts of the country. But overall, the drought has still intensified. The latest tracking classifies more than a fifth of the contiguous United States in "extreme or exceptional" drought, the worst ratings.

In some parts of the Lower Midwest, water-starved crops have collapsed, but the farmers have not. Farmers across the country are surviving, and many are even thriving. This year, despite the dismal season, farmers stand to make exceptionally good money, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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