11:54pm

Wed June 6, 2012
Education

Computers Grade Essays Fast ... But Not Always Well

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 3:04 am

As schools look to cut costs, more are considering using computers to grade students' writing assignments and to provide writing help. The programs can assess large numbers of papers in seconds.
David L Ryan The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Imagine a school where every child gets instant, personalized writing help for a fraction of the cost of hiring a human teacher — and where a computer, not a person, grades a student's essays.

It's not so far-fetched. Some schools around the country are already using computer programs to help teach students to write.

There are two big arguments for automated essay scoring: lower expenses and better test grading. Using computers instead of humans would certainly be cheaper, but not everyone agrees on argument No. 2.

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11:53pm

Wed June 6, 2012
Out in the Bay - June 7, 2012 - Queers in sports

First out gay NFL player tells his story on Out in the Bay

David Kopay on the cover of ManDate a few years after he retired from pro football and came out as gay
ManDate

Queers - and homophobia - in sports.  In 1975, former 49er David Kopay came out as gay, wrote a bestselling book about it, and rocked the sports world. 37 years later, despite all the gains for gay rights generally, only a handful of major athletes have followed him out of the closet. He’s still an activist and athlete, and the official race starter for this year’s SF FrontRunners Pride Run, June 23 in Golden Gate Park. Kopay shared his story on Out in the Bay.

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11:52pm

Wed June 6, 2012
Science

A Scientist's 20-Year Quest To Defeat Dengue Fever

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 12:26 pm

Scott O'Neill wants to rid the world of dengue fever by infecting mosquitoes with bacteria so they can't carry the virus that causes the disease.
Benjamin Arthur for NPR

First of a two-part series

This summer, my big idea is to explore the big ideas of science. Instead of just reporting science as results — the stuff that's published in scientific journals and covered as news — I want to take you inside the world of science. I hope I'll make it easier to understand how science works, and just how cool the process of discovery and innovation really is.

A lot of science involves failure, but there are also the brilliant successes, successes that can lead to new inventions, new tools, new drugs — things that can change the world

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11:50pm

Wed June 6, 2012
Revolutionary Road Trip

Tunisia's Leader: Activist, Exile And Now President

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 11:26 am

Moncef Marzouki, the president of Tunisia, photographed in the presidential palace.
John W. Poole NPR

NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep is taking a Revolutionary Road Trip across North Africa to see how the countries that staged revolutions last year are remaking themselves as they write new social rules, rebuild their economies and establish new political systems. Steve and his team are traveling some 2,000 miles from Tunisia's ancient city of Carthage, across the deserts of Libya and on to Egypt's megacity of Cairo. In Tunisia, he sat down with the country's new president, Moncef Marzouki.

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9:12pm

Wed June 6, 2012
Dead Stop

How Dorothy Parker Came To Rest In Baltimore

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 5:17 pm

Baltimore Mayor Kurt Schmoke (center left) and NAACP Executive Director Benjamin Hooks lower the ashes of writer Dorothy Parker into her final resting place at the NAACP headquarters in 1988.
Carlos Rosario AP

The writer, poet and critic Dorothy Parker was technically not a native New Yorker; she was born at her family's beach cottage in New Jersey. But she always considered New York City to be her beloved hometown. It's where she grew up, where she struggled during her early days as a writer, where she became famous, and where she died of a heart attack at the age of 73.

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6:00pm

Wed June 6, 2012
YOUR LEGAL RIGHTS

The case against Big Tobacco and cigarette addiction

Chuck Finney is joined by Dr. Stanton Glantz, UCSF Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education to talk about the case against Big Tobacco and cigarette addiction.

5:09pm

Wed June 6, 2012
Crosscurrents

Crosscurrents: June 6, 2012

Neighborhood watches grow in Oakland; Question Bridge - Black Males: Do you have a problem eating fried chicken, watermelon, and bananas in front of white people?; "Streetopia" - part exhibit, part festival; and local duo Black Cobra.

4:59pm

Wed June 6, 2012
Arts & Culture

Utopia on Market Street? A San Francisco art exhibit explores the possibilities

Bangkok Coffee, 2012

There’s talk that we’re in the midst of a second tech boom in San Francisco. Twitter is opening its new headquarters in the Central Market district and residents are buzzing about what’s to come. Mayor Ed Lee has been courting start-ups since he came into office, hoping they’ll bring thousands of new jobs to the city.

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4:57pm

Wed June 6, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

CT Scans Boost Cancer Risks For Kids

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 3:04 am

Isabel Doran, 4, gets a CT scan at Children's National Medical Center with her mom, Veronica Doran. The X-ray radiation in CT scans raises the risks for cancer, including leukemia, a new study shows.
Dayna Smith The Washington Post/Getty Images

Children who get CT scans are at slightly increased risk for brain cancer and leukemia, according to a large international study released Tuesday.

CT scans create detailed images of the inside of the body. So they're great for diagnosing all sorts of medical problems — so great that their use has soared in recent years. More than 80 million are being done every year in the United States.

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3:44pm

Wed June 6, 2012
It's All Politics

On The Ground In Wisconsin: Lessons From The Winning Side

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 7:45 am

Don Taylor, GOP chairman in Wisconsin's Republican-dominated Waukesha County.
Liz Halloran NPR

Don Taylor, one of Wisconsin's most influential Republicans, had predicted that GOP Gov. Scott Walker would stave off recall challenger Tom Barrett, a Democrat, by a couple of percentage points.

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