1:39am

Fri September 7, 2012
Business

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 7:15 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business comes from China, and the word is: Wahaha. That's the name of China's third-largest beverage company. It sells soda, juice and other bottled drinks.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The name means laughing children. It turned out the man who runs it is the one with the most to laugh about.

INSKEEP: Zong Qing Hou is now the richest man in China, according to Bloomberg billionaire's index, which calculated his net worth to be $21.6 billion.

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1:39am

Fri September 7, 2012
Politics

Next President Will Still Have To Work With Congress

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 7:15 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Throughout this program we've been hearing parts of President Obama's speech. The people watching that speech in Charlotte last night included Ramesh Ponnuru. He writes for National Review and for Bloomberg. And in a column this week he predicted that if President Obama should win reelection the next four years will look a lot like the past two.

Welcome back to the program, Mr. Ponnuru.

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1:39am

Fri September 7, 2012
Sports

2012 Paralympics Best-Attended Since Games Began

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 7:15 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This year's Paralympics have been the best-attended games since the movement began back in 1960. Over 4,200 athletes from 164 countries are taking part in games that end this weekend. Disabled athletes began competing after World War II when a doctor in Britain organized the international wheelchair games to coincide with the 1948 London Olympics. Tanni Grey Thompson is one of Britain's most successful paralympians.

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1:39am

Fri September 7, 2012
Business

Amazon Rolls Out Its New Kindle E-Readers

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 7:15 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A new line of tablet readers is at the top of NPR's business news.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: They come from Amazon, which is rolling out its latest Kindle e-readers. They are faster, we're told, as well as cheaper. And as NPR's Steve Henn reports, they're aimed squarely at the youngest members of the family.

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1:39am

Fri September 7, 2012
Business

Business News

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 7:15 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with strike two.

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1:39am

Fri September 7, 2012
Election 2012

Thousands Of Shut-Outs Watch Obama Speech On TV

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 7:15 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Speaking to the Democratic Convention last night, President Obama spoke a line that played off a famous speech by John F. Kennedy. Kennedy said people should ask what they can do for their country.

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12:24am

Fri September 7, 2012
The Salt

When It Comes To Buying Organic, Science And Beliefs Don't Always Mesh

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 1:10 pm

A shopper surveys the produce at Pacifica Farmers Market in Pacifica, Calif., in 2011.
AP

We heard from a lot of you — and we mean a lot of you — about our recent report on the Stanford School of Medicine analysis of several studies on the health effects of organic foods.

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12:23am

Fri September 7, 2012
Planet Money

This Man Makes Beautiful Suits, But He Can't Afford To Buy One

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 7:15 am

See photos of Peter Frew and other tailors in this slide show from The New York Times Magazine.
Marvin Orellana The New York Times

Peter Frew is one of a tiny number of people left in the United States who can — entirely on his own, using almost no machinery — make a classic bespoke suit. He can measure you, draw a pattern, cut the fabric and then hand-stitch a suit designed to fit your body perfectly.

Frew spent more than a decade as an apprentice for a remarkable tailor in his native Jamaica. He now sells his suits for about $4,000. Since New York is filled with very rich people who see their suits as an essential uniform, Frew has all the orders he can handle.

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12:22am

Fri September 7, 2012
The Salt

Panera Sandwich Chain Explores 'Pay What You Want' Concept

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 1:11 pm

This Panera Cares store in Chicago switched from for-profit to nonprofit this summer, and it started asking customers to pay whatever they want.
Niala Boodhoo for NPR

The concept of "pay what you want" for goods and services is a nostalgic throwback to the days when people trusted one another just a little bit more, and it's something you expect to see at the occasional farm stand or at a hip, independent coffee shop.

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12:21am

Fri September 7, 2012
Education

Recess In Chicago? Strike Threat Draws National Eyes

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 7:15 am

Members of the Chicago Teachers Union hold an informational picket outside Willa Cather Elementary School on Aug. 20 in Chicago. Teachers could go on strike Monday.
Sitthixay Ditthavong AP

The Chicago Public Schools system is teetering on the edge of a strike, just a week into the school year. Teachers say they'll walk out Monday morning if tense weekend negotiations don't bring a contract. It would be the first Chicago teachers strike in 25 years.

At Parker Elementary School on Chicago's South Side, students are jumping double Dutch and hula-hooping. This is the first time many of the kids on this playground have ever had recess. The playtime is part of an extended school day pushed for by Mayor Rahm Emanuel.

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