1:24pm

Mon July 9, 2012
All Tech Considered

Father Of The Cellphone 'Unleashed' World's Callers From Copper Wires

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 2:37 pm

Martin Cooper holds a Motorola DynaTAC, a 1973 prototype of the first hand-held cellular telephone, in San Francisco in 2003. Cooper made the world's first public call from a cellphone in 1973.
Eric Risberg AP

They called it "the brick." And Martin Cooper says it really did look like one: 8 inches high, an inch and a half wide, 4 inches deep, and weighing 2 1/2 pounds.

In other words, the world's first hand-held cellphone, the Motorola DynaTAC, weighed the equivalent of about eight iPhones. (Try jamming that into a pocket.)

"The battery life was only 20 minutes," says Cooper, a former vice president at Motorola who has been called the "father of the cellphone." "But that was not a problem because you couldn't hold that heavy thing up for more than 20 minutes."

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1:18pm

Mon July 9, 2012
TURNSTYLE NEWS

Google on crusade to take down YouTube downloading sites

Video-to-download service youtube-mp3.org which has a reported four million unique visitors is now on the top of Google’s piracy list.

In a letter sent to the site’s owner by YouTube’s Associate Product Counsel Harris Cohen states that, “offering any kind of service that allows YouTube content to be downloaded (as opposed to simply streamed) is prohibited.”

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1:06pm

Mon July 9, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Why Silk May Someday Be Added To Vaccines

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 1:36 pm

Soft to the touch, silk may also help preserve vaccines and drugs someday.
Fiorenzo Omenetto Tufts University

Silk is in neckties, scarves and some fancy underwear and pajamas. Before too long, it might just help keep people from getting sick with measles or polio.

Vaccines play an important role in health, but can be tricky to transport to the far corners of the world. Many vaccines and some other drugs require constant refrigeration — from the factories where they're made to the places where they're ultimately injected into people.

That's where silk comes in.

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1:03pm

Mon July 9, 2012
It's All Politics

Who 'Owns' The Bush Tax Cuts?

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 1:53 pm

They're called the Bush tax cuts for a reason. And when they were passed in the early 2000s, most Democrats opposed them.

Cut to a decade later: President Obama is calling for a second extension in as many years of the "temporary" cuts, but it won't come without a fight from congressional Republicans.

Given the apparent role reversal, who owns the George W. Bush-era tax cuts now: Democrats or Republicans?

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1:02pm

Mon July 9, 2012
The Salt

Brits Battle For Cheesy Glory By Writing National Anthem For Cheddar

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 5:54 am

The British Cheese Board is looking for a national anthem for cheddar cheese.
iStockphoto.com

12:52pm

Mon July 9, 2012
Bluegrass Signal 7/14

Live On Arrival!

Merle & Doc Watson (photo: David Gahr)

Throughout July & August, host Peter Thompson presents programs of live concert recordings.  The series kicks off this week with highlights from two 1970 shows in New York with Doc & Merle Watson, plus Doc and the Nashville Bluegrass Band at MerleFest in 2006.   Available for listening through Saturday 7/21/12 via KALW's Local Music Player.

12:23pm

Mon July 9, 2012
Crosscurrents

Crosscurrents: July 9, 2012

A live performance of Crosscurrents! -- at the Polish Club in SF's Mission District, 12/3/2011. The endangered sounds of the end of the earth; a conversation with Nikki Silva (of the Kitchen Sisters); Monday Hearts for Madeliene; and local guitarist/singer Quinn Deveaux.

12:09pm

Mon July 9, 2012
The Two-Way

Four More Charged In Border Patrol Killing Linked To 'Fast And Furious'

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 12:14 pm

With wanted posters off to the side, James L. Turgal, Jr., right, FBI Special Agent in Charge, listens as Laura E. Duffy, United States Attorney Southern District of California, announces the indictments on five suspects involved in the death of U.S. Border Patrol agent Brian Terry on Monday.
Ross D. Franklin AP

The Justice Department has unsealed criminal charges against four more people it says are connected to the death of U.S. Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry, as the FBI offered a $1 million reward for information leading to the capture of the fugitives.

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11:55am

Mon July 9, 2012
Judging The Health Care Law

Congress' Big Stick Just Got a Little Shorter

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 10:58 am

Susan Clark (left) argues with another protester about the Affordable Care Act outside the U.S. Supreme Court. Chief Justice John Roberts likened the law's Medicaid expansion provision to "a gun to the head" of states.
Kris Connor Getty Images

Nothing breeds lawsuits like uncertainty. That being the case, the Supreme Court's landmark health care ruling is almost certain to open the door to lawsuits challenging the federal government's authority.

The court ruled the federal government can't force states to participate in a major expansion of Medicaid or else risk losing existing Medicaid funds from Washington. That threat amounted to unconstitutional coercion.

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11:37am

Mon July 9, 2012
AIDS: A Turning Point

Teen Years Pose New Risks For Kids Born With HIV

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 8:33 pm

A boy waits to get his anti-AIDS drugs from pharmacist Rajesh Chandra at the Botswana-Baylor Children's Clinical Center of Excellence in Gaborone.
Jason Beaubien NPR

The southern African nation of Botswana is grappling with a relatively new problem in the evolving AIDS pandemic: It now has a large group of HIV-positive adolescents.

The teenagers were infected at birth before Botswana managed to almost wipe out mother-to-child transmission of the virus. These children have survived because of a public health system that provides nearly universal access to powerful anti-AIDS drugs.

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