3:26pm

Wed May 2, 2012
Law

Key Clemens Witness Leaves Prosecutors Scrambling

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 7:44 am

Andy Pettitte leaves the courthouse after testifying Wednesday in the perjury and obstruction trial of former teammate Roger Clemens in Washington, D.C.
Win McNamee Getty Images

The prosecution at the perjury trial of baseball great Roger Clemens suffered another major setback Wednesday. One of its key witnesses, pitcher Andy Pettitte, conceded that he may have misunderstood his former teammate as saying he used human growth hormone (HGH).

Clemens is charged with lying to Congress when he testified before a House committee that he had never used performance-enhancing drugs.

Read more

3:10pm

Wed May 2, 2012
The Two-Way

News Corp Board Gives Murdoch Its Vote Of Confidence

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 3:16 pm

Rupert Murdoch, shown above with his son James (left) last July.
Sang Tan AP

A little more than a day after a committee of British parliamentarians said Rupert Murdoch was "not a fit person" to lead a major international company, the board of News Corp. said they still backed Murdoch's leadership.

NPR's David Folkenflik reports that the board issued the statement of suport unanimously.

Read more

2:41pm

Wed May 2, 2012
Education

Cal State Faculty On Strike Amid A 'Scary Future'

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 7:44 am

California Faculty Association Vice President Douglas Domingo-Foraste (right) helps Cal State, Long Beach, professor Mark Sugars vote last month on whether to authorize a strike. The strike was authorized Wednesday.
Damian Dovarganes AP

California State University, the nation's largest four-year, public university system, is in trouble. Wednesday, professors authorized a strike over working conditions and pay, and students began a hunger strike demanding a tuition freeze.

The faculty authorization allows for two-day strikes at each of the schools in system, one after the other. A strike date is pending, though, and will only take place if negotiations fail.

This unfolding crisis is the result of massive state cuts in funding that have pushed higher education in California to the breaking point.

Read more

2:41pm

Wed May 2, 2012
Business

Home Sweet Mobile Home: Co-Ops Deliver Ownership

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 7:44 am

Gary Thulin, 70, says he used to dream of financial stability. Now, the New Hampshire co-op resident and mobile home owner says he and his wife could sell their home, pay off the loan they took out on it, and still walk away with $10,000.
Dan Gorenstein for NPR

Judy Stoddard, 71, lives in Carver, Mass., but every weekday morning, she picks herself up out of bed and drives to Boston.

"I do the back roads, which gets me there in an hour and 40 minutes," Stoddard says. "I'm exhausted when I get there. I'm exhausted when I come home."

Stoddard drives those back roads for a reason — she can't see out of one eye. But as long as her rent keeps creeping up, she keeps going back to work.

"I can't retire. I want to keep my house. I put a lot of work in this house. I don't want to lose it," she says.

Read more

2:40pm

Wed May 2, 2012
All Tech Considered

Explosion In Free Online Classes May Change Course Of Higher Education

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 7:44 am

It's become much cheaper and easier to offer classes online.
Matjaz Boncina iStockphoto.com

Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are teaming up in a $60 million venture to provide classes online for free. The move is the latest by top universities to expand their intellectual reach through the Internet — a trend that is changing higher education.

Read more

2:06pm

Wed May 2, 2012
Latin America

Cuba's New Mantra: Viva Private Business

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 3:26 pm

Two self-employed florists prepare bunches of flowers in Havana last year. The Cuban government is stepping up economic reforms and estimates that in four or five years, nearly half the workforce will be employed in the private sector.
STR AFP/Getty Images

Socialism has been Cuba's official economic policy for more than a half-century, and some 85 percent of the Cuban workforce is employed by the state.

But that is changing fast. Communist authorities say that nearly half of Cuba's economic activity will shift to the private or "non-state" sector in the next four or five years.

Those plans signal a new urgency to Cuban President Raul Castro's economic reforms, and one reason is that Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, the island's biggest benefactor, is battling cancer and facing re-election in October.

Read more

2:04pm

Wed May 2, 2012
TURNSTYLE NEWS

Webby Awards Recognize Outstanding Internet Presence

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 5:04 pm

It may be an old-school brand, but the Volkswagon Beetle was one of the winners of the still-new-feeling Webby Awards, the 16th annual results of which were announced today.  The awards recognize excellence on the Internet and are sponsored by the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences.

Read more
Tags: 

2:04pm

Wed May 2, 2012
Election 2012

Before Recall, Wis. Dems Must Choose Walker's Rival

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 2:33 pm

A new poll shows Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett leading among Democrats vying to challenge Republican Gov. Scott Walker in a recall election in June. The Democratic primary is Tuesday.
Dinesh Ramde AP

The political civil war that has gripped Wisconsin since Republican Gov. Scott Walker's 2010 election will intensify next week when Democrats pick a candidate to post up against the governor in a historic recall election in June.

Tuesday's Democratic gubernatorial primary has developed into a two-person race between Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, who lost to Walker in the GOP landslide of 2010, and former County Executive Kathleen Falk, the favorite of the state's public employee unions.

Read more

1:40pm

Wed May 2, 2012
Middle East

A Syrian Graffiti Artist, Defiant Until Death

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 7:44 am

Zahra was an anti-government activist and graffiti artist in Syria. He and his friends spray-painted slogans against President Bashar Assad around the suburbs of Damascus, the Syrian capital.
Courtesy of friends of Nour Hatem Zahra

They called him "the spray man" for his graffiti that appeared all over the Syrian capital of Damascus. But in truth, 23-year-old Nour Hatem Zahra was an activist like any other activist.

He started protesting in Syria last spring. Back then, the opposition thought it would only take a few months to get rid of President Bashar Assad, as it had in Tunisia and Egypt.

Then Syrian forces started killing protesters, detaining them, torturing them. And the people started fighting back.

Read more

1:21pm

Wed May 2, 2012
Europe

In Greek Election Campaign, Anger Trumps Civility

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 3:26 pm

Communist Party of Greece lawmaker Liana Kanelli enters her car after protesters threw yogurt at her as she tried to reach the Greek Parliament on June 29, during a 48-hour general strike in Athens. Such attacks are not uncommon in Greece, where ordinary Greeks' anger over the debt crisis and austerity measures is boiliing over.
AFP/Getty Images

Greeks will vote Sunday in what is expected to be the most fractious parliamentary election in decades.

People are so divided that no party is expected to get enough votes to form a government. Voters blame politicians for bankrupting the country and then selling it out to international lenders, who forced the government to impose painful austerity measures in exchange for billions of euros in bailout loans.

This election is an early one; the economic crisis forced out the previous elected government led by George Papandreou.

Read more

Pages