11:57pm

Wed April 25, 2012
Asia

An African Trader And The Perils Of Business In China

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 7:31 am

Kelvin Njubigbo, one of the many African traders in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou, made two profitable trips to the city from his native Nigeria. On his third trip, he was robbed of $19,000.
Nina Porzucki for NPR

It's dinnertime at a bustling Kentucky Fried Chicken in the Little Africa neighborhood of Guangzhou, in southern China. Chinese schoolgirls nibble on fries, a grandmother feeds her grandson, and Kelvin Njubigbo stares at a single wing on his tray. His foot, wrapped in a gauze bandage, juts out from the table.

"Everything is risk in life," repeats Njubigbo. "It's all risk from the beginning to the last."

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11:56pm

Wed April 25, 2012
Sports

Taking One Last Swing At Baseball's Big Time

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 6:21 am

After being called up to play for the Atlanta Braves in 2009, Reid Gorecki batted in a run against the New York Mets at Citi Field.
Jim McIsaac Getty Images

On the night of Aug. 17, 2009, Reid Gorecki achieved what every minor league ballplayer hopes to achieve: He played in his first major league game.

"Everything I hoped and imagined it would be, it was," he says. "Being a part of that for the first time was just fabulous."

Gorecki was picked up by the Atlanta Braves after bouncing around various minor league teams for seven years. He put on a Braves uniform for a total of 31 games.

Then, it was over.

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6:00pm

Wed April 25, 2012
YOUR LEGAL RIGHTS

Employment Law - Call a lawyer night!

Chuck Finney is joined by attorneys Anthony Oncidi and Lisa Maki to discuss recent court decisions regarding employment law.

It's also Call a Lawyer Night. Listen for an opportunity to call in with your legal questions.

4:37pm

Wed April 25, 2012
Transportation

Decoding the mysteries of Bay Area traffic

If you added up all of the time that all of us spend stuck in Bay Area traffic, it would average out to about 40 million hours a year. It doesn’t take much to slow down traffic – accidents and construction and weather conditions all have an impact. And, there’s more than cars in the road.

Last year, a truck full of chickens overturned on 80 near Fairfield. And then there was the herd of cattle that wandered through the toll plaza on the Benicia Bridge. Not to mention all the falling ladders – that’s one of the most common pieces of debris.

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4:18pm

Wed April 25, 2012
Crosscurrents

Crosscurrents: April 25, 2012

Decoding the mysteries of Bay Area traffic; Doyle Drive and the father of the Golden Gate Bridge; and "The Waiting Room": examining the healthcare system through its public waiting rooms.

4:18pm

Wed April 25, 2012
Afternoon News Roundup

Connecting the Dots: Afternoon edition for Wednesday, April 25, 2012

(BayCitizen) //  A necessary step in San Mateo's ability to accept and house an expected influx of low-level prisoners was approved at the County Board meeting yesterday. Last year 66 low-level prisoners entered the county's jail system sas part of the 2011 statewide realignment mandate. That number could be closer to 600 this year...

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3:24pm

Wed April 25, 2012
The Two-Way

U.N. Refugee Chief: 'We Are All Overstretched'

Antonio Guterres, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, speaks to the press during a visit to camp Andalusia for internally displaced people from southern Sudan, some 30 kms south of the capital Khartoum.
Ashraf Shazly AFP/Getty Images

Over the past year and a half, the world has seen crisis after crisis. Today, NPR's Michele Kelemen spoke to António Guterres, the United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees, mostly about the crisis in Sudan.

But at one point during their talk, Guterres rattled off the crises they've dealt with since the beginning of 2011: The Ivory Coast, Libya, Syria, Yemen, both a famine and conflict in the Horn of Africa, Mali and now Syria is flaring up again.

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3:22pm

Wed April 25, 2012
It's All Politics

Obama, Romney Face Uphill Fights As General Election Starts For Real

Originally published on Wed April 25, 2012 4:52 pm

AP

The Republican primaries were certainly fun while they lasted, especially for political journalists and junkies for whom the intramural fighting generated no shortage of interesting and sometimes bizarre story lines.

But President Obama's campaign aides were all but certain from the start that they would be running against Mitt Romney. That was one of the few areas of agreement between the former Massachusetts governor's campaign and the Obama people.

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3:19pm

Wed April 25, 2012
Arts & Culture

The Source: Doyle Drive and the Father of the Golden Gate Bridge

Frank P. Doyle cuts a chain with an acetylene torch at the opening of the Golden Gate Bridge.
Courtesy Sonoma County Library

You can’t talk transportation in the Bay Area without talking about bridges. Everybody knows the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate Bridge. And if you’re driving between the two, you travel on another bridge: an elevated and windy two-lane road through San Francisco's Presidio called Doyle Drive. That's changing this weekend, as the old Doyle Drive, built in 1937, continues the transformation into the Presidio Parkway.

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2:52pm

Wed April 25, 2012
Around the Nation

After Riots, Scandal Sparked Reform In LAPD

Originally published on Wed April 25, 2012 5:28 pm

Los Angeles police form a line to keep a crowd from entering a building on April 30, 1992. Twenty years after the L.A. riots, most civil rights and community groups give the LAPD high marks for progress.
Nick Ut AP

It's been 20 years since Los Angeles erupted in riots following the acquittal of four white police officers in the beating of black motorist Rodney King. There have been many changes in the city since those days of fire, looting and public discord, but perhaps the biggest changes can be seen in L.A.'s police department.

On a drive around the heart of South Central L.A., there are still plenty of weed-filled lots where businesses that burned down in the riots used to stand. There's also still a lot of crime.

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