12:17am

Fri March 7, 2014
Parallels

Seeking Energy Independence, Europe Faces Heated Fracking Debate

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 8:39 am

Many countries in the European Union are drawn to the benefits of fracking: cheap energy and energy independence. But many Europeans, including these protesters standing outside EU headquarters in Brussels, object to the practice on environmental grounds.
Virginia Mayo AP

While watching the turmoil in Ukraine unfold, you may feel as though it has little to do with the United States, but the conflict is stirring a contentious debate in Europe over a topic familiar to many Americans: fracking.

Much of the continent depends on Russian natural gas that flows through pipelines in Ukraine. European countries are asking themselves whether to follow the U.S. example and drill for shale gas.

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12:16am

Fri March 7, 2014
StoryCorps

A Homeless Teen Finds Solace In A Teacher And A Recording

Originally published on Fri March 7, 2014 8:39 am

Celeste Davis-Carr, a high school English teacher in Chicago, learned her student Aaron was homeless from a recording for the StoryCorpsU program.
StoryCorps

Aaron didn't intend to tell his classmates that he was homeless. But when he recorded his own story with StoryCorpsU — a project designed to help kids in high-needs schools build stronger relationships with their teachers — he says, it just came out.

"I felt ... like a big load was let off," Aaron explains. (NPR has withheld Aaron's last name, at the request of his foster care agency, to protect his privacy.) "I don't know what made me say it, but I'm like, 'Let me just be honest and just get it out.' "

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12:15am

Fri March 7, 2014
The Edge

From War In The Desert To 'Murder Ball On Ice'

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 9:18 am

Former Marine Josh Sweeney lost both of his legs to a bomb in Afghanistan in 2009. He's competing with the U.S. Men's Sled Hockey team at the Paralympics in Sochi.
David Gilkey NPR

It might not exactly be doctor's orders, but it made perfect sense to Josh Sweeney.

"If you hit somebody, you feel a lot better," he says, making his way off the ice from a grueling practice with the U.S. Paralympic Sled Hockey team — a sport also known as "murder ball on ice."

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12:14am

Fri March 7, 2014
The Salt

States Fight California's Chicken Cage Law. But It's Really About Bacon

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 9:55 am

Free-range chickens lay eggs for Sauder's Quality Eggs in Pennsylvania.
Dan Charles NPR

By most measures, David Kesten's hens are living the good life.

"They can act like chickens, they can run around," says Kesten, who's raising hens in an old wooden shed in the open countryside near Concordia, Mo. "They can go out and catch bugs, they can dig in the ground."

But most U.S. hens live crammed into very close quarters, according to Joe Maxwell, with the Humane Society of the U.S. And he says that's just wrong.

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12:00am

Fri March 7, 2014

11:46pm

Thu March 6, 2014
Economy/Labor/Biz

Could You Use a Workover?

On the Mar. 23, 2014 edition of Work with Marty Nemko, I devote the entire hour to trying to help you with your career conundrum or that of someone you care about. I call those three-minute workovers although sometimes they can take as long as ten. Plus,  I intersperse my favorite career tips.

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6:12pm

Thu March 6, 2014

Do young "invincibles" need health insurance?

Lead in text: 
From our partners at Youth Radio.
Source: Youthradio
March 6th, 2014 According to Young Invincibles.org, as of February 12th, 800,070 youth nationwide have signed up for health care through the Affordable Care Act. Youth Radio participants explain why health care is important to them and why the word "invincible" is not something they identify with.

6:10pm

Thu March 6, 2014

Gay priest ousted by conservative bishop

Lead in text: 
From our partners at the East Bay Express.
Source: Eastbayexpress · Via: Sam Levin
During Sunday Mass several weeks ago at Newman Hall Holy Spirit Parish in Berkeley, Father Bernard Campbell spoke of anger, bitterness, and sadness. At the end of the service, the pastor read a short excerpt from a poem: "A friend once gave me a gift, a box of darkness, and it took me a long time to discover that even this was a gift."

5:41pm

Thu March 6, 2014
Arts & Culture

Women's History Month on Philosophy Talk: Simone de Beauvoir

Simone de Beauvoir is often cast as only a novelist or a mere echo of Jean-Paul Sartre. But she authored many philosophical texts beyond The Second Sex, and the letters between her and Sartre reveal that both were equally concerned with existentialist questions of radical ontological freedom, the issue of self-deception, and the dynamics of desire. This episode explores the evolution of de Beauvoir's existential-ethical thinking. In what sense did she find that we are all radically free? Are we always to blame for our self-deception or can social institutions be at fault?

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5:22pm

Thu March 6, 2014
Economy/Labor/Biz

Contemplating the local impact from America’s next supersized trade deal

Yard signs placed in front of hotels in Leesburg, VA during TPP negotiations in September 2012
Flickr user Public Citizen

 

Trade representatives from twelve countries have been discussing the Trans-Pacific Partnership for four years. They’re discussing removing tariffs, protecting the environment, and stopping the piracy of copyrighted  material - all in the name of freer international trade.

Not much is known about what’s in this agreement, but based on what’s been leaked, here’s what we think we know about a couple of key components that will affect Californians: cows and computers.

On the farm

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