4:03pm

Thu July 10, 2014
Monkey See

Snubs And Successes: 6 Lessons Learned From This Year's Emmy Nominations

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 7:59 pm

Mindy Kaling and Carson Daly announce nominations for The 66th Primetime Emmy Awards Thursday morning.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

There are things you could quibble about in the array of nominations announced today for the 66th Primetime Emmy Awards.

No best drama series nomination for CBS' The Good Wife, though several stars got acting nods. No acting nomination for Orphan Black star Tatiana Maslany, though she plays about eight different roles on BBC America's clone-focused adventure drama. No best variety show nod for John Oliver's increasingly stellar Last Week Tonight on HBO. And a best TV miniseries nod for A&E's dreadful Bonnie and Clyde?

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3:49pm

Thu July 10, 2014
The Salt

'Captain Pizza' Saves The Day, But Doesn't Save Himself A Slice

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 4:51 pm

Intrepid pizza purveyors in action: Frontier Airlines flight attendants pass out pies to the delighted passengers.
Logan Marie Torres AP

It's one of those stories that start in the middle. Midflight from Washington, D.C., to Denver on Monday, pilot Gerhard Brandner hit some bad weather that forced him to land in Wyoming. It was a mundane delay like most others. His Frontier Airlines plane was grounded on a tarmac in Cheyenne.

That's when the pilot made a decision that made him a national hero.

"I figure out, well, I'm getting hungry; I'll bet you the folks be hungry back there, too," Brandner says. "So I called Domino's."

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3:16pm

Thu July 10, 2014
Politics

Obama's Request For Immigration Funds Meets Pushback On The Hill

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 4:04 pm

President Obama has asked Congress for $3.7 billion in emergency funds to address the influx of immigrant children at the U.S.-Mexico border. The Senate Appropriations Committee is holding a hearing Thursday about the request.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

3:16pm

Thu July 10, 2014
The Salt

This Fine Wine Made At An Italian Penal Colony Is No 2-Buck Chuck

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 4:58 pm

Marquise Lamberto Frescobaldi (right), of the winemaking dynasty, talks with prisoners Brian Baldissin (left) and Francesco Papa at his vineyard on Gorgona island in June 2013.
Alessandro Bianchi Reuters/Landov

Eighteen miles off Tuscany's coast, Gorgona is Italy's last island prison. Its steep cliffs rise up from azure Mediterranean waters. Here, a select group of convicts serves the end of long sentences by farming. And now, a legendary winemaker is training them to make high-end wine.

Mentioned by Dante in The Divine Comedy, Gorgona was for thousands of years a refuge for hermits and monks. Since 1869, it's been a penal colony.

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3:15pm

Thu July 10, 2014
Shots - Health News

A Growing Number Of Veterans Struggles To Quit Powerful Painkillers

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 2:30 pm

Bryan McDonel and his father, Mike, both served multiple tours in Iraq with the National Guard. Bryan was first prescribed painkillers before his deployment, and his dependence on medication prompted a downward spiral.
Quil Lawrence NPR

There are antlers everywhere on the walls of Bryan and Mike McDonel's place near Pine Bluff, Ark. The house is hardly big enough for all their hunting trophies. Both are good shots with their hunting bows; Bryan and Mike, his father, served in the Arkansas National Guard and deployed together to Iraq, twice.

The McDonel family has served in the military for generations. But Bryan, 35, is out of the service now. He is one of thousands of troops and veterans who struggle with addiction to prescription drugs.

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3:03pm

Thu July 10, 2014
The Two-Way

Clerical Error Puts Church On New York's 'George Carlin Way'

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 8:41 am

George Carlin opens the 13th annual U.S. Comedy Arts Festival at the Wheeler Opera House in Aspen, Colo., in 2007, a year before his death at age 71.
E. Pablo Kosmicki AP

The Corpus Christi Church in Manhattan, where iconoclastic comedian George Carlin once attended school and which he later ridiculed in some of his monologues, has a new street address: George Carlin Way.

The New York Times calls what's being described as a clerical error "an irony of Carlinesque proportions." The church fought a street named after the comedian since the idea was proposed three years ago.

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2:17pm

Thu July 10, 2014
The Two-Way

Signs Emerge Of A Compromise On Obama's $3.7B Immmigration Request

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 2:22 pm

Immigrants from Honduras and El Salvador who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border illegally are stopped in Granjeno, Texas, on June 25. President Obama asked Congress this week for $3.7 billion to cope with thousands of minors from Central America who are illegally crossing the U.S. border.
Eric Gay AP

A compromise appears to be emerging between Congress and the White House that would lead to the swift deportation of thousands of minors from Central America who have illegally crossed the border into the U.S.

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2:00pm

Thu July 10, 2014
The Salt

Alcohol Test: Does Eating Yeast Keep You From Getting Drunk?

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 3:52 pm

The idea that it might be possible to keep drinking a delicious bottle of pinot noir or tall bottle of beer and go right back to work is a tempting one.
Alex Eben Meyer for NPR

Sometimes we drink with the sole purpose of relaxing, or drowning the week's worries. But other times we just want to savor a special craft beer or vintage wine, or make that good meal taste even better.

And as we get older, we're warier of that third or fourth glass. The consequences of too much alcohol — the drowsiness, the confusion and the wobbling — are a bigger hindrance. And let's face it: A hangover at 36 isn't the same as one at 22.

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1:33pm

Thu July 10, 2014
The Two-Way

No Charges For Police Who Killed Woman After D.C. Chase

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 12:14 pm

Capitol Hill police officers look at a car belonging to Miriam Carey after she was shot and killed on Oct. 3 following a high-speed car chase that started near the White House.
Charles Dharapak AP

The Justice Department has decided not to bring criminal charges against two police who shot and killed a woman after a wild car chase from the White House to the grounds of the U.S. Capitol last fall.

The woman, 34-year-old Miriam Carey of Stanford, Conn., struck a security officer with her car near the White House on Oct. 3 before driving off at high speed. Carey's 1-year-old daughter was in the car at the time of the incident but was unharmed.

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1:32pm

Thu July 10, 2014
Shots - Health News

Doctors Face Ethical Issues In Benching Kids With Concussions

If parents won't bench a child after a concussion, is it OK for the doctor to tell the coach?
iStockphoto

Doctors have gotten much better at diagnosing and treating sports-related concussions, which is a good thing since Americans suffer up to 4 million sports-related concussions a year.

But we're not so good at is following their advice.

Student athletes and parents sometimes balk at doctors' recommendations to avoid play until concussion symptoms are gone, or to cut back on schoolwork. Both have been shown to speed recovery, and getting another hit on a vulnerable brain increases the risk of long-term problems.

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