6:29am

Thu January 16, 2014
The Two-Way

Weekly Jobless Claims Hold Steady At Pre-Recession Level

Originally published on Thu January 16, 2014 7:28 am

The scene at a job fair in Marietta, Ga., last November.
David Goldman AP

There were 326,000 first-time claims for jobless benefits filed last week, the Employment and Training Administration said Thursday.

While down only 2,000 from the previous week, claims did hold steady around the level where they were typically running before December 2007, when the economy slipped into its latest recession.

Read more

6:03am

Thu January 16, 2014
The Two-Way

Oscar Nominees For Best Picture Include 'Captain Phillips,' 'Gravity'

Originally published on Thu January 16, 2014 8:22 am

Tom Hanks in Captain Phillips.
Hopper Stone, SMPSP

Let the arguments begin over who and which film should have been nominated but weren't.

This year's nominees for Oscars from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences were just announced and they include:

Best Picture

-- American Hustle

-- Captain Phillips

-- Dallas Buyers Club

-- Gravity

-- Her

-- Nebraska

-- Philomena

-- 12 Years a Slave

Read more

5:52am

Thu January 16, 2014
Education

Colleges Guide Low-Income Students From Getting In To Graduating

Originally published on Thu January 16, 2014 8:03 am

President Obama wants to see more low-income students enroll in college, but actually graduating is becoming a priority.
iStockphoto

Bryn Mawr College is located just outside Philadelphia, but every year the school goes looking for students in Boston.

Bryn Mawr typically admits 10 low-income students from the Boston area each year, providing them with financial assistance and introducing them to one another in hopes that they will form a network and support each other as they navigate their college years.

Bryn Mawr doesn't stop in Boston. Working with the nonprofit groups Posse Foundation and College Match, the college actively seeks to enroll low-income students who show great promise.

Read more

5:29am

Thu January 16, 2014
Parallels

Do You Know Who Owns Your Favorite Liquor?

Originally published on Thu January 16, 2014 12:18 pm

The Japanese drinks company Suntory plans to buy Beam Inc., which includes Jim Beam and Maker's Mark bourbon. They are shown next to Suntory's Yamazaki and Hakushu whiskies at Suntory headquarters in Tokyo on Tuesday. The deal makes Suntory one of the world's leading drinks companies in an industry where a handful of companies increasingly dominate the global market.
Issei Kato Reuters/Landov

Liquor companies like to make drinkers think their favorite spirits always have been and always will be attached to a very particular place — Kentucky bourbon, Irish whiskey, Russian vodka.

But like many other industries, the liquor business has gone global, and a small number of players increasingly dominate the industry worldwide. The distilling may still be local, but ownership is definitely international.

Read more

4:53am

Thu January 16, 2014
The Two-Way

34 Officers At Nuclear Site May Have Cheated On Exams

Originally published on Thu January 16, 2014 7:35 am

An intercontinental ballistic missile in its silo at Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana.
Airman John Parie U.S. Air Force

Already reeling from reports about alleged drug use by some officers in its nuclear missile corps and the alleged "drunken and inappropriate behavior" of that command's top general, the Air Force now has another scandal on its hands.

Read more

4:02am

Thu January 16, 2014
The Two-Way

Hal Faulkner, Marine Whose Last Wish Was An Honorable Discharge, Dies

Originally published on Thu January 16, 2014 7:52 am

Earlier this month, Hal Faulkner (left), 79, received his new papers from two Marines after having his military status changed to "honorable discharge." Faulkner died Tuesday.
Courtesy of Phil Latzman
  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Quil Lawrence on the death of Hal Faulkner

Hal Faulkner, a gay man whose last wish came true earlier this month when his discharge from the U.S. Marines was changed from "undesirable" to "honorable," has died.

NPR's Quil Lawrence, who told Morning Edition listeners about Faulkner last week, says that the 79-year-old Faulkner died Tuesday in Florida.

Read more

12:28am

Thu January 16, 2014
The Salt

Sometimes A Perfect Stranger Is The Best Dinner Host

Originally published on Thu January 16, 2014 12:07 pm

A group gathers in a Ballston, Va., home for a supper club organized through the site Feastly. A new food trend gaining popularity in New York and other cities lets diners enjoy a meal prepared by a stranger in that person's home.
Courtesy of Noah Karesh

With website names like Eat With, Side Tour, VoulezVousDiner and Feastly, a new food trend that is sweeping New York and other cities allows diners to enjoy fine meals inside someone else's home.

Read more

12:28am

Thu January 16, 2014
Business

Detroit Touts Clean, Efficient Diesels, But America Isn't Sold

Originally published on Thu January 16, 2014 12:07 pm

Automakers like GM, Chrysler and Volkswagen are introducing new, cleaner diesel passenger cars to the U.S. market as fuel-efficient alternatives.
Carlos Osorio AP

At the North American International Auto Show in Detroit this week, it's not all hybrids and battery-powered cars. Some car companies are making significant investments in a fuel that's not new at all — diesel.

The newest diesel engines are far cleaner than their predecessors, and they get many more miles per gallon. The question is, what's holding customers back from switching gas pumps?

When you look around the auto show, there's a lot of energy and there's a lot of money being spent again. The one topic that keeps coming up, of course, is fuel economy.

Read more

12:27am

Thu January 16, 2014
Science

An Old Tree Doesn't Get Taller, But Bulks Up Like A Bodybuilder

Originally published on Fri January 17, 2014 6:12 am

The world's biggest trees, such as this large Scots pine in Spain's Sierra de Baza range, are also the world's fastest-growing trees, according to an analysis of 403 tree species spanning six continents.
Asier Herrero Nature

Like other animals and many living things, we humans grow when we're young and then stop growing once we mature. But trees, it turns out, are an exception to this general rule. In fact, scientists have discovered that trees grow faster the older they get.

Once trees reach a certain height, they do stop getting taller. So many foresters figured that tree growth — and girth — also slowed with age.

Read more

12:26am

Thu January 16, 2014
It's All Politics

Jobs Pitchman Takes Labor Department's Show On the Road

Originally published on Thu January 16, 2014 12:07 pm

"Any federal employee who's driving a Dodge Viper either has a really good spouse, a really good inheritance or needs to be investigated by the inspector general," Labor Secretary Tom Perez says at the Detroit Auto Show.
Brian Naylor NPR

Tom Perez is having fun at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. He sits in a Corvette, climbs into a new pickup truck, and gamely poses for pictures next to a $140,000 Dodge Viper.

"Any federal employee who's driving a Dodge Viper either has a really good spouse, a really good inheritance or needs to be investigated by the inspector general," he jokes.

Read more

Pages