Audrey Dilling

Reporter/Producer/Editor

Audrey Dilling is an editor and reporter for KALW's evening news and culture magazine, Crosscurrents. Her primary beat is California's water crisis. She is also a mentor in KALW's "Audio Academy."

From 2011-2013, she produced KALW's community storytelling project, Hear Here, which began as part of the Association of Independents in Radio's national "Localore" initiative, designed to bring journalistic and technical ingenuity to extending public media service to more Americans. Part radio project, part community engagement effort, and part live event series, Hear Here stories  gave Bay Area residents a chance to make their voices heard – on public airwaves, online, and on stage. 

Dilling studied audio documentary at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in English Literature from Lewis & Clark College.

Ways to Connect

Audrey Dilling

 


All week long, we've been playing this sound and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.


Audrey Dilling

 

Marie-Jo Fremont pays a lot of attention to the sky these days.

Audrey Dilling

 

On June 7, Bay Area voters will weigh in on the Bay Area’s first-ever regional tax to fight climate change. If passed, Measure AA would collect $12 per year from property owners in all nine Bay Area counties.

 

"History Part2" by Flickr User Laura / Used under CC CC BY-SA 2.0 / resized and cropped

Drew Ackerman works in the Alameda County Public Library system by day, but at night, his Sleep with Me podcast helps listeners around the world fall asleep.

4/14: Vying to vote

Apr 14, 2016


Audrey Dilling

Seventy thousand people call San Francisco’s suicide crisis line each year. If someone's making that call, it usually means they're on the verge of harming themselves, and in severe emotional distress. But San Francisco has a service that’s aimed at reaching people before they’re on the brink of crisis — the San Francisco Mental Health Peer-Run Warm Line.

Audrey Dilling

 

An unusual scene has been playing out at Ocean Beach over the past few weeks.

Audrey Dilling

 

 

When I pull up to the building at 310 Esplanade Avenue in Pacifica, all of the doors to the 20 apartments have yellow signs on them that say, “RESTRICTED USE.” Most of the residents are already out; they’re only allowed inside to grab their final loads. And that’s exactly what Jeff Bowman is doing. He’s packing his last boxes into a pickup truck parked out front.

Flickr user Daniel Hoherd under CC license. Resized/cropped.

 

Any day now, The California State Water Resources Control Board will vote on whether to extend Governor Jerry Brown’s mandatory restrictions on water use.

Audrey Dilling

According to a report by the San Francisco Rent Board, efforts to evict tenants are at a ten-year high, with more than 2,000 eviction notices filed in 2015.

Audrey Dilling

 

About a hundred people are seated in the basement auditorium at the San Francisco Main Library, waiting for an affordable housing lottery to begin.

Under CC re-use with permission from Flickr User Brooke Andersson (cropped and re-sized).

As the market pushes residents out of San Francisco, how does the city step in to provide homes that people can afford? Who do these homes go to? Reporter Audrey Dilling sat down with KALW's Hana Baba to explain the laws we have today, and how Mayor Ed Lee proposes to  make housing more affordable. 

Courtesy of Scott Kildall/ Waterworks

 


Chava Kronenberg is on a manhole hunt.

“Oh! Wow! There it is! We have a winner!” she exclaims near the intersection of Geary Boulevard and 5th Avenue in San Francisco.

Todd Whitney

Despite the recent rain and projections that El Niño is on its way, there’s little chance that the storms will end California’s drought. At least, Governor Brown’s not counting on it.

Audrey Dilling

 

 

When it’s finished, the Transbay Terminal will be a hub for 11 public transit systems – from Muni to AC Transit to California High Speed Rail – connecting people from all around the state. It’s being touted as the future “Grand Central of the West”. But right now, it’s a big hole in the ground – one that people have to travel around, rather than through.

Courtesy of Bert Johnson/East Bay Express

Nextdoor.com is a website designed to bring neighbors together by helping them ask questions, get to know each other, and post local recommendations.

Audrey Dilling

The median rent for a one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco’s Mission District is currently about  $3,500 per month. That means a renter needs to make almost $130,000 per year if she wants to spend just a third of her paycheck on rent. Singer-songwriter Candace Roberts doesn’t fall into that income bracket. 

Under CC license from Flickr user Eric Goldberg

 

San Francisco voters will see two competing clean-energy propositions on their ballots in November: Propositions G and H. But, what they won’t see is that the electrical union workers union that wrote Prop G is now actually supporting H.

Scientists project that the level of the water in the San Francisco Bay will rise three feet by the end of this century. That’s a conservative estimate - storm surges and extremely high tides could bring that number up to eight feet. This encroaching water poses a threat to existing developments and to future ones. In its latest investigation, the San Francisco Public Press examined the plans for more than 21 billion dollars worth of incoming development around the Bay.

Leslye Corsiglia has been working to create affordable housing in San Jose for more than 30 years. She's just recently left the city's Department of Housing to take a a position at the helm of a new advocacy organization called Silicon Valley at Home. She sat down with KALW’s Audrey Dilling to talk about the region’s challenges and opportunities for affordable housing.

 

Click the audio player to hear the full interview.

 

  

http://ticketing.frameline.org/festival/film/detail.aspx?id=3645&FID=52

The 39th annual Frameline Film Festival, which features films and shorts about the LGBTQ experience, starts tomorrow in San Francisco.

One short film, The Typist, reaches back 60 years to tell the story of Otto Bremerman, a closeted gay Navy man who served as an office clerk during the Korean War. He was responsible for typing up dishonorable discharges of colleagues outed for being gay. Filmmaker Kristine Stolakis discovered Bremerman’s story in the oral history archives at the San Francisco’s GLBT Historical Society. She joined KALW’s Audrey Dilling in our studio to talk about the process of bringing an audio story to life on the screen.

Flikr user Jeff Croft

The number of children in the city of San Francisco is dwindling. Back in the 1960s, kids made up a full quarter of the population. The latest census numbers showed the city was made up by only 13.4 percent of them. But now, after a concerted effort by City Hall, there’s been a dramatic change.

A note for our readers: the following story is of an adult nature.

The LA Times recently published an editorial that reported that California’s reservoirs are currently storing only about a year’s worth of water supply. Significant storms could still add to that supply, but it’s daunting data, coming at the tail end of the traditional wet season.

Flickr user toyzrus8

The Hetch Hetchy Regional Water system, operated by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (PUC), carries water to 2.6 million customers in the Bay Area. How it does that is remarkable – remarkably simple, says PUC Water Resources Manager, David Briggs.

Audrey DIlling

A couple on an evening stroll down Valencia Street comes to a stop outside Lost Weekend Video. They’re peering in through the big front window.

“I wanted to check it out because I haven’t seen a video store in a long time,” says Abel Martinez. “These days I watch a lot of pirated movies.”

Under CC license from Flickr user Janet Ciucci

California is entering its fourth year of drought – and it’s really starting to show in some of the state’s most vital water resources. The Central Valley Project, which supplies water for about a third of California’s farmland, recently announced it had no water to give. That means those farmers will have to seek water elsewhere or let fields go fallow. About six percent of available farmland went unplanted last year due to the drought, resulting in more than $1 billion in lost revenue. The dire situation has left farmers and regular folks alike wondering when’s it going to end.

KALW’s Audrey Dilling has been looking into how much water it would take to get us out of this drought. She joined KALW’s Hana Baba in studio to talk about what she learned.

Under CC license from Flickr user Don McCullough

For this story we head down to San Jose, where wild pigs have been causing quite a stir. These big, burly beasts weigh around 300 pounds. All that weight can do a lot of damage when it goes tearing through a suburban lawn or golf course. That’s what these animals have been up to lately around San Jose, especially in the neighborhoods that border rural hillsides. So, in January, the San Jose City Council voted to extend a law that allows licensed people to trap and shoot the animals. The law was set to expire, but now it’s in effect permanently. To find out what this means for San Jose and it’s pig population, KALW’s Audrey Dilling spoke with Terris Kasteen from California Fish and Wildlife.

TERRIS KASTEEN: The pigs come through in one night and the sod is completely roto-tilled. It's torn up. Gone.

Wikimedia commons user Gazebo

 

The Searsville Dam is causing big trouble on the peninsula. The 122-year-old, 65-foot-tall dam is closed to the public, hidden away on 1,200 acres owned by Stanford University.

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