Audrey Dilling

Reporter/Producer

Audrey Dilling produces KALW's community storytelling project, Hear Here, which began as part of the Association of Independents in Radio's national "Localore" initiative, designed to bring journalistic and technical ingenuity to extending public media service to more Americans. Part radio project, part community engagement effort, and part live event series, Hear Here gives Bay Area residents a chance to make their voices heard – on public airwaves, online, and on stage. 

For over two years, Dilling has worked alongside the vibrant KALW News team, reporting and producing radio features for the evening news magazine Crosscurrents; and serving as a web editor, online engagement strategist, and volunteer coordinator.

Dilling studied audio documentary at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in English Literature from Lewis & Clark College.

Ways To Connect

Under CC license from Flickr user Beatrice Murch

In San Francisco’s Richmond District, where Geary Boulevard meets Park Presidio, there stands a bright, white, defunct Christian Science church. There are big white columns out front, with pink steps leading up to iron double doors.

But, what goes on inside this church is not quite what you’d expect.

When you’re up in an airplane, shopping can be difficult. Unless, of course, you reach into the pocket of the seat in front of you and find a SkyMall catalogue. That’s the airline magazine that offers products like a special vacuum for your dog’s droppings or a human slingshot, right at the moment when you might be bored enough to buy them.

Under CC license from Flickr user Scott2342

When you go to vote next Tuesday, the first thing you’ll see in the list of state measures is Proposition 1. It’s also being called “the water bond”. And let’s get one thing straight right now – this bond won’t resolve the current drought. We can’t vote to make it rain.

But, Proposition 1 can make it rain in the form of $7.5 billion worth of funding for water projects around the state. These could include projects that recycle, conserve, and store more of the water we already have.

Audrey DIlling

Bay Area homes, businesses, and factories send about 550 million gallons of wastewater to treatment plants every day. That’s enough water to fill 750 Olympic-sized swimming pools. Just six percent of this water gets re-used for agricultural, industrial, and other non-potable purposes – meaning nobody drinks it. The rest gets discharged back into the Bay.

joetuman.com

On November 4th, Oakland voters will pick their next mayor. All month on “Crosscurrents,” we are going to bring you the voices of each of the 15 people who are campaigning for the job.

Joe Tuman is a self-described outsider to Oakland city government. He’s been a member of politically-focused Oakland organizations – including one that kept tabs on local public safety funding from Measure Y – but he’s never held political office. Instead, he’s spent nearly three decades teaching government and law at San Francisco State. And he’s competed in thirteen Ironman triathalons.

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