Audrey Dilling


Audrey Dilling produces KALW's community storytelling project, Hear Here, which began as part of the Association of Independents in Radio's national "Localore" initiative, designed to bring journalistic and technical ingenuity to extending public media service to more Americans. Part radio project, part community engagement effort, and part live event series, Hear Here gives Bay Area residents a chance to make their voices heard – on public airwaves, online, and on stage. 

For over two years, Dilling has worked alongside the vibrant KALW News team, reporting and producing radio features for the evening news magazine Crosscurrents; and serving as a web editor, online engagement strategist, and volunteer coordinator.

Dilling studied audio documentary at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in English Literature from Lewis & Clark College.

Ways To Connect

If you listen to KALW regularly, you might have noticed that every day, we announce the school lunches in the San Francisco Unified School District. What you might not know is that KALW studios are actually located inside a San Francisco High School. In this story from our archives, KALW’s Audrey Dilling followed the former head lunch lady here in the school cafeteria and brought back Gowana Keys’ reflections on nearly three decades of serving school lunch.

Market Street begins, or ends – depending on how you see it – down by the bay. There’s a plaza here, Justin Herman, where Market almost hits the Embarcadero.

The Hear Here project has been visiting libraries and community organizations around San Francisco and Oakland, bringing back the personal stories of people who live in those cities. At the San Francisco Main library, they discovered Chris Mason. Mason came to the library to share his story of coping with a life-altering nervous system disorder.

Listen to the full story above. 

If you're a San Francisco resident, there is a good chance you went to college. Over 40 percent of the residents are college graduates, making San Francisco one of the most educated cities in the country. So when we send our community storytelling team out to gather stories from locals, many have tales of college life. Our Hear Here team heard one of them from San Franciscan, Ben Nelson at the San Francisco Main Library. He shared his plan for a new kind of Ivy League university, which he first thought of as a college student.

Listen to the full story above.

In 1924, Frank and Josephine Duveneck, a wealthy Palo Alto couple, saw a valley they liked in Los Altos Hills. So they bought it. Then they built and ran what would become the oldest operating hostel in the country. They preserved the local watershed by buying up the hills around it.