Chris Hoff

News Engineer

Chris Hoff has been an engineer with KALW News' Crosscurrents for about three years now, and before that he volunteered and reported for the show starting in 2006. The road to radio and KALW was a circuitous one: Hoff's undergraduate career in Classics left him aimless, professionally speaking; his zeal for Pindar, Homer, Thucydides, and Virgil could not earn him a living, so in 2002 he floated around, first to Weimar, Germany, then to Berlin.  It was in Berlin that Hoff uncovered his enthusiasm for the then-burgeoning internet radio phenomenon known as "podcasting."  For two years he made podcasts with a buddy of his until he decided to get more serious with the medium. So after getting his feet wet in broadcast journalism at CNN Berlin in 2006, Hoff moved back to San Francisco, met Holly Kernan and Ben Trefny at KALW, and settled into his work with the fabulous Crosscurrents team.  Quoth Hoff, "It is satisfying to have acquired a practical skill after so many years of dabbling and dilettantism."

Ways To Connect

The sharing economy and a system where time is money, a Hear Here segment about a woman who's spent 30 years working at Oakland's Highland Hospital, a jazz perspective on John Pizzarelli, and local musicians Zebop.

KALW's new Hear Here project: stories from you, from both sides of the Bay; graffiti as art or vandalism; home owners commissioning graffiti artists to tag their homes; murals in San Francisco's Mission District,  and local musicians Shotgun Wedding Quintet.

Looking for work with a criminal record, fighting high unemployment in Marin City, a revival of sacred harp singing, and local musicians The Fret Not Old-Time Gospel Band.

Reactions from the passage of the Affordable Care Act, the ban on foie gras, improving school lunch programs in Oakland, the inequalities of food access around the world, and local musicians Golden Bough.

Caltrain engineers coping with suicides, what the UC system can learn from Chile about its rising costs, a jazz perspective on Sue Terry, and local musician A Girl Named T.

We hear voices from San Francisco's LGBT Pride Weekend, reactions to California state parks closing, prison inmates as wildfire firefighters, and local musicians Dirty Ghosts.

Rights of transgender immigrants facing deportation, a music festival powered by bikes, and an Iraq veteran transitions back to civilian life in San Francisco.

Oakland city debt and pension cuts, a collector of old movie posters, a silent film museum, and local musicians La Pena Community Chorus of Berkeley.

Becoming a charter school, a tech company driven not by profits but by humanitarian concerns, a fatherly story in time for Father's Day, what a true love means, and local musicians T.V. Mike and the Scarecrowes.

Transitioning from a foster youth to an adult, AB 12 and California policy on emancipating foster youth, a new Oakland school that advocates careers in Public Health, and nurse practitioners serving as primary care physicians.

Part 2 in our series on Asian American mental health issues, finding translators for Spanish speakers, and federal and local agents spying on Muslims and mosques.

The latest in California and San Francisco transportation, sequencing Iranian genomes, campaign music, and local musicians The Barbary Ghosts.

Proposition A: San Francisco's garbage and recycling system; dumpster diving; living on food stamps ($4.50 a day); and local musician Tornado Rider.

The final program in our series on Oakland's Fruitvale and San Antonio neighborhoods, produced by KALW News and Mills College in Oakland. We take a look at a corner store on Foothill Boulevard, a funeral home that's playing a vital role in the community, and we take a ride on Oakland's bus line 1.

Part 2 of our special on Oakland's San Antonio and Fruitvale neighborhoods. Today we hear from a dynamic principle at Roosevelt Middle School, look at a successful charter school, and take a tour of a community garden in San Antonio Park.

A special Crosscurrents on Oakland's Fruitvale and San Antonio neighborhoods: mobile food vendors, Street Level's  service to day laborers, and The Unity Council's work in low- to middle-income families. Produced by Mills College in Oakland.

Volunteerism fills in the gaps that budget have made in Pinole, CA; the pitfalls of success for black men, the upcoming full solar eclipse and urban astronomers, and exploring sound at the Exploratorium.

Breaking down the cost of the wine known as two-buck Chuck, restaurants offering economy deals during the recession, circus culture in San Francisco, the debut of our new project Hear Here, and baby animals.

Domestic violence and the women's group La Casa de las Madres, a look at San Francisco's Tenderloin through theater, a new documentary film about the dwindling resource of water, and local musician The Tia Fuller Quartet.

 Learning to bike in urban areas, understanding democracy through Jazz, a traditional approach to knives and knife-sharpening, SF comedian Will Durst on the Republican vice-presidential nomination, and local musicians Makru.

Workers in the Golden Gate Bridge Labor Coalition strike, documentary filmmaker Terrence Nance, meeting a batting cage instructor in Burlingame, SF comedian Will Durst on the presidential elections, and local musicians Boca do Rio.

An update on the San Francisco Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi case, a poem in your pocket, a community dance ritual, a new film about the San Francisco adult film industry, and bald eagles.

Update on the Wells Fargo Protests in San Francisco, Secure Communities and sharing fingerprints of those arrested with immigration enforcement officials, American-born children struggle to adapt to Guatemala town, San Francisco dance group celebrates 30 years of art and service, and local musicians The Corner Laughers.

American-born children struggle to adapt in rural Guatemalan town

Apr 24, 2012

The issues of birthright citizenship, and so-called anchor babies, have a way of flaring tempers. For now, anyway, the children of illegal immigrants born in this country are allowed to live here with the same rights as any other citizen, assuming they were born in this country. But it often happens that the children don’t live here once their parents are caught and sent home. In a joint report from the Fronteras public radio project, Peter O’Dowd and Nadine Arroyo Rodriguez visited a small town in Guatemala, where more than a dozen American children live.

 California State University in financial crisis, cuts to Cal Grant that gives low- and middle-income college students financial aid, a conversation with the anti-bullying organization "No Bully," local comedian Will Durst on Mitt Romney, and local musicians Forest Day.

Potentially devastating effects of foreclosure on the health of homeowners and their families, neighborhoods banding together against banks to fight foreclosures, and local musician Craig Ventresco.

 Why California gas prices are so high, the relationship between poverty and health, listener responses to the lack of free bus passes for students, and local musicians Future Twin.

The youth perspective on the Trayvon Martin murder, a young environmental activist, raiding the recycling bins as a business, an old-time radio repair man, and local musician Judith Linsenberg.

A special Crosscurrents on the 1990 bombing of Earth First activists Judi Bari and Darryl Cherney.

Difficulties for kids getting to school in San Francisco; one San Franciscan coming to grips with accepting food stamps; extracting bees; stomping around at the music club Death Guild; and local musicians The Berkeley High School Jazz Band.

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