Eric Jansen

Announcer/Board Operator; Producer/Co-Host, Out in the Bay

Eric Jansen is a veteran broadcaster and print journalist.  A former news anchor, producer and reporter at KQED FM, San Francisco; KLIV AM, San Jose; and Minnesota Public Radio, Eric's award-winning reports have been heard on many NPR programs and PRI's Marketplace.  His print work has been in The Mercury News, The Business Journal, and gay magazines Genre and The Advocate, among other publications.  He co-produced the June 2007 PBS documentary Why We Sing!, about GLBT choruses and their role in the civil rights fight.

In addition to producing Out in the Bay, Eric is a part-time announcer and board operator at KALW, and assists businesses and non-profits in PR, communications planning and media training.

Ways To Connect

Maura Halloran plays two lesbian lovers, their cat and their nosy landlady in “Pussy,” and Genevieve Jessee plays herself, her hippie mom and her Deep South grandmother in “Girl In, But Not Of, The ‘Hood.”  On this week’s Out in the Bay, hear Jessee and Halloran perform selections from their intriguing solo shows and talk about their work and about DIVAfest, a celeb

Are lesbian, gay and transgender seniors getting proper and respectful care in nursing homes, day-care centers and in their own homes?  A groundbreaking state-funded survey in Alameda County showed very encouraging trends, and also room for improvement. Dan Ashbrook of the non-profit group Lavender Seniors conducted a series of caregiver trainings also funded by the state grant.

‘Success’ and a Faun’s Afternoon. Richard Howard, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and translator, amuses us while musing on French fauns, ghosts of all-but-forgotten New York cruising spots, and the cultural figures he’s memorialized or channeled in verse – including painter Alice Neel, dancer Isadora Duncan and Madame Charles de Gaulle.  Now in his eighties, this “living legend” shares his poems, tells us about the eroticism of translation, and reflects on gay life before many of you were born.

Inequality hits LGBT people right in the assets. Remember all the hype about the “marriage penalty”?   Actually, most of the penalties come if you cannot marry. Legal inequities -- especially the federal Defense of Marriage Act -- allow or even require discrimination in taxes, pensions, health care, real estate and much more. At this taxing time of year, financial advisor Mark Grace (photo 2) and estate planning attorney Susan von Herrmann (photo 2) fill us in on the extra steps queer people must take to protect themselves and their families financially.

This week's Out in the Bay features two new Bay Area dance productions.  In LandHome, Great-Uncle Billy was killed 30 years ago in Cleveland for "how he dressed."  The Secret History of Love delves into the speakeasies, cabarets and other meeting places of decades past when queer love was even more illegal than now. 

Choreographers and dancers Sean Dorsey, Sheena Johnson, and Atasiea (Kenneth Ferguson) share their stories and their work with host Eric Jansen and you.  

Spring into summer with the Bay Area Rainbow Symphony (BARS)!  Eric Jansen's guests on this live edition of Out in the Bay are BARS principal clarinetist Susan Barnes; and San Francisco Opera violinist and Oakland East Bay Symphony co-concertmaster Dawn Harms (pictured), who is featured guest soloist for BARS' March 24 concert. They'll play selections from upcoming BARS concerts and tell us about this four-year-old LGBT community orchestra that's been called "a breath of fresh air" in the Bay Area classical music scene.

How does a comic deal with personal tragedy? On this week's Out in the Bay, hosts Marilyn Pittman and Eric Jansen play excerpts from Marilyn's solo show, "It's All the Rage," about her parents’ 1997 murder-suicide, and talk about rage, PTSD, gender roles, and how humor, friends and her wife helped her survive.  

Lou Harrison: A World of Music is a new documentary about a composer some consider among the greatest of the 20th Century.  Harrison charted new territory in  music by combining Western classical styles with Eastern music, and is credited with - among other kudos - firmly establishing gamelan music in the U.S.  He also lived an openly gay life in New York City in the 1940s before moving back to California to compose in serenity.  Among his fans and collaborators were San Francisco Symphony conductor Michael Tilson Thomas, composers John Cage and Janice Gitek, c

Flaming Faggotry: Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore, editor of the new queer anti-assimilationist anthology "Why Are Faggots So Afraid of Faggots? Flaming Challenges to Masculinity, Objectification, and the Desire to Conform," is back for another "delicious conversation" on Out in the Bay. This time, he -- oops, I mean she -- brings Harris Kornstein, aka ice-skating drag queen Lil Miss Hot Mess, one of his/her San Francisco-based contributors with her/ him.