Hana Baba

News Reporter/Host

Hana Baba is a reporter and host of Crosscurrents, a daily radio newsmagazine that broadcasts on KALW Public Radio in the San Francisco Bay Area.  

She interviews and reports on ethnic communities, poverty, health, culture, religion, arts, and the global nature of the San Francisco Bay Area.  Her work also appears on NPR programs, PRI's The World, BBC World Service, and New America Media. A Sudanese-American, Hana also reports from and about Sudan and Sudanese, and is fluent in Arabic.

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5:08pm

Thu March 26, 2015
Education

Report finds diversity is in decline in SF public schools

Under CC license from Flickr user torbakhopper

The latest edition of the San Francisco Public Press features a report called "Choice is Resegregating Public Schools." In it, reporter Jeremy Adam Smith unveils the reality of diversity, or more accurately the lack thereof, in San Francisco's public schools. San Francisco Unified School District's 'choice' system allows parents to rank and choose any school in the city for their children. Then, a lottery determines where they go.

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1:22pm

Thu March 26, 2015
Health, Science, Environment

Investigation questions the prescription of psychotropic drugs to foster youth

Screenshot of the Bay Area News Group documentary, "Drugging our Kids"

 

On Thursday, March 26th, at the Tech Museum in San Jose, the Bay Area News Group is screening a documentary as part of its latest investigation into the over-prescription of drugs in California’s foster care system. The state has almost 60,000 foster youth – and one out of every four is given psychotropic drugs. Those are drugs to fix their behavior, not to help a mental illness. And they’re known to have horrible side effects. 

Reporter Karen de Sa spoke with many foster children for the investigative series “Drugging our Kids.” She came by our studios earlier this week to talk about what she discovered.

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3:56pm

Mon March 23, 2015
Technology

Black Girls Code trains young women of color for careers in tech

Black Girls Code intern Vanessa See with another intern, Bella, working on a trampoline.
Courtesy of blackgirlscode.com

Electrical engineer and computer programmer Kimberly Bryant says that when she was in college, she was one of only a few women, and the only black woman, in her graduating class. When she had her own daughter, Kai, she wondered what she could do to get more young girls of color into the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math-- known as STEM.

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5:45pm

Thu March 12, 2015
Health, Science, Environment

What's it going to take to get out of the drought?

Lake Shasta, California's largest reservoir.
Under CC license from Flickr user Janet Ciucci

California is entering its fourth year of drought – and it’s really starting to show in some of the state’s most vital water resources. The Central Valley Project, which supplies water for about a third of California’s farmland, recently announced it had no water to give. That means those farmers will have to seek water elsewhere or let fields go fallow. About six percent of available farmland went unplanted last year due to the drought, resulting in more than $1 billion in lost revenue. The dire situation has left farmers and regular folks alike wondering when’s it going to end.

KALW’s Audrey Dilling has been looking into how much water it would take to get us out of this drought. She joined KALW’s Hana Baba in studio to talk about what she learned.

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4:56pm

Thu March 5, 2015
Immigration

Angel Island's Historic Treasure Restored

The immigration station at Angel Island
angelisland.org

The San Francisco Bay has long been a gateway for immigrants. Between 1910 and 1940, more than a million people from 80 different countries entered the United States through the immigration station on Angel Island. 

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