Hana Baba

News Reporter/Host

Hana Baba host of Crosscurrents, KALW's evening newsmagazine. 

She interviews and reports on communities of color, immigrant life, education, culture, religion, arts, and the local-global connections  of the San Francisco Bay Area.  She co-hosts the podcast The Stoop. Her radio work also appears on NPR programs, PRI's The World, and BBC World Service. A Sudanese-American, Hana loves reporting about African immigrant communities living in California.

Ways to Connect

Handout / Center for Youth Wellness

When we experience trauma as children — whether it’s the stress of an abusive parent, divorce, substance abuse, or the effects of poverty — do these traumatic events affect our lives even when we grow up?

 

According to Pew Research, 75 percent of Americans have smartphones. Most of us are using them for GPS directions, and about 70 percent of Americans are on some kind of social media.  Roughly two thirds on Facebook.

Alexa Denton

 

A 2015 industry survey found that about 80 percent of those working in publishing are white.

 

Later this month, Starbucks plans to close down 8,000 of its stores to train its employees on implicit bias. This comes after a manager kicked two Black men out of a Starbucks in Philadelphia in April.

Asal Ehsanipour / KALW News

 

Last Wednesday, Grace Cathedral hosted an event that got national attention: a Beyoncé Mass.

This is nothing new for a religious institution that holds labyrinth walks and yoga classes for hundreds of people, along with a “Sister Act” mass, and a bluegrass mass that ran the same weekend as the Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival.

Grace also stages progressive readings of scripture with popular music each Wednesday.  

When filling out the United States census, Egyptians, Moroccans, Iranians, and many other people from the Middle East and North Africa have always had to check the box 'White' or other. There’s no Middle Eastern or North African box. This is problematic because these communities rely on representation when it comes to things like legislative redistricting and health statistics—in addition to the cultural inaccuracy of calling them white in the American context. 

CC Flickr User Mike Linksvayer, resized and recropped

 

This is part of our series  “Persistent Poison: Lead’s Toxic Legacy in the Bay Area,” an in-depth look at childhood lead poisoning in the region.

 

Courtesy of Faisal Zedan

 

Oakland’s Faisal Zedan is a musician from a village in southern Syria. Growing up, his family loved music, and he grew to be obsessed with Arabic drums called darabukkas.

When we have conversations about war and refuge, we sometimes forget our children are listening. So how do you talk to kids about things like the war in Syria?

That’s what Union City children’s author Naheed Senzai tackled in her new novel for middle schoolers, Escape from Aleppo. The story follows 14-year old Nadia as she makes her way out of the devastation of war.

Courtesy of UC Berkeley Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society

 

Scholars from around the country are at UC Berkeley this week for a conference exploring racial justice. It’s called "Race & Inequality in America: The Kerner Commission at 50."

Courtesy of Detroit Free Press

In the summer of 1967, more than 150 riots broke out in Black communities across the country, protesting racial injustice. President Johnson then called a special commission to investigate, which produced an unusual document, called the Kerner Report, which analyzed the reasons why Black communities were frustrated and rising up.

Courtesy of Snap Judgment

In 2017, there were 77 homicides in Oakland. Our friends at the podcast Snap Judgment reported on each one.

Sikh Coalition

 

Hate crimes against many communities have increased in recent years, and Indian Sikhs are no exception.

Courtesy of Alphabet Rockers

 

When we think of hip-hop shows, we may think of night clubs and big loud concert halls. But how bout 11 a.m. at the public library in the kids section?

Hana Baba

 

This weekend African entrepreneurs and innovators are converging in Mountain View to talk business.

The Stoop: Angry Black woman

Jan 22, 2018
ILLUSTRATION BY NEEMA IYER

For decades, Black women have been stereotyped as being "loud" and "dramatic" and often asked to quote "tone it down" — especially in the workplace.

ILLUSTRATION BY NEEMA IYER

The Stoop podcast is hosted by KALW's Hana Baba and Leila Day. 

Daniel Grisales, resized and recropped

Shanthi Sekaran is a Berkeley author whose new novel Lucky Boy zooms in on two immigrant families who live right here in the Bay Area. It tells the story of two very different women as they strive to achieve their version of the American Dream.

Ali Khaligh

One of the greatest amplifiers of ethnic news in the United States is shutting down at the end of the month.

Courtesy of Green Apple Books

 

San Francisco's iconic Green Apple Books grew from a 750-square-foot storefront on Clement Street in 1967, to a space of over 8,000 square feet today.

Courtesy of Ryse Youth Center

 

The RYSE Youth Center is hosting its third annual film festival called Truth Be Told: Justice Through My Eyes, a showcase of films by up-and-coming young filmmakers.

Courtesy of Catalyst Project, via their Facebook

At a time of increasing racial polarization in the United States, white people who want to provide support across racial and ethnic differences are often confronted by complex issues of privilege and sensitivity.

Courtesy of UC Hastings

Since Donald Trump won the presidency, we’ve been hearing more and more about a disenchanted white working class that was fed up with a system that they say wasn’t working for them.

Courtesy of AC Thompson

 

Hate crimes in California have increased just over the last year. The state is now home to 79 hate groups, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center. That’s more than anywhere in the country.

Ben Trefny

Some people in the Bay Area got an unfiltered view of the eclipse. In San Francisco, a thin fog and cloud layer allowed viewing through ordinary sunglasses. In other socked in spots, the eclipse was not visible. KALW reporters around the region and in other states recorded reactions of onlookers.

 

A psychology team at Stanford studied whether self-affirmations actually work to improve academic performance for students of color.

Photo by Judy Dater, resized and recropped

Elizabeth Rosner’s parents both survived the Holocaust. Growing up she felt traumatized, even though she personally didn’t experience the camps. And when she talked to other children of survivors — not just of the Holocaust, but also of the Cambodian killing fields and the Armenian genocide — she realized she wasn't alone.

angelisland.org

The San Francisco Bay has long been a gateway for immigrants. Between 1910 and 1940, more than a million people from 80 different countries entered the United States through the immigration station on Angel Island. 

Akashic Books

The dark fiction genre, "noir",  evokes smoky black and white crime films, with fast talkin’, gun toting men in slick suits and fedoras. But what does noir mean today? 

Tom Levy

About 20% of American Muslims are converts — people who didn’t grow up with the religion and often don’t have any cultural ties.

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