Hana Baba

News Reporter/Host

Hana Baba is a reporter and host of Crosscurrents, KALW's evening newsmagazine. She's also part of KALW's project The Spiritual Edge.

She interviews and reports on ethnic communities, poverty, health, culture, religion, arts, and the global nature of the San Francisco Bay Area.  Her work also appears on NPR programs, PRI's The World, BBC World Service, and New America Media. A Sudanese-American, Hana also reports from and about Sudan and Sudanese.

Center for Investigative Reporting

The Center for Investigative Reporting is experimenting with bringing investigative journalism in many formats, from everything from print to live performance to animation. One of their latest projects is Techsploitation, a graphic novel that looks at shady employment practices in the tech world.

To many Americans, Falafel is a fried ball of mashed up garbanzo beans that you can put in a sandwich. But to me, falafel reminds me of where I’m from – Sudan. Until recently, I thought there was really only one way to make it. But it turns out, there are many ways to fry a falafel, depending on where you’re from – and of course, everyone thinks their way is best. So I headed out around the Bay on a falafel shop hop.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gazeronly/14290955660
Under CC license from Flickr user torbakhopper

The latest edition of the San Francisco Public Press features a report called "Choice is Resegregating Public Schools." In it, reporter Jeremy Adam Smith unveils the reality of diversity, or more accurately the lack thereof, in San Francisco's public schools. San Francisco Unified School District's 'choice' system allows parents to rank and choose any school in the city for their children. Then, a lottery determines where they go.

 

On Thursday, March 26th, at the Tech Museum in San Jose, the Bay Area News Group is screening a documentary as part of its latest investigation into the over-prescription of drugs in California’s foster care system. The state has almost 60,000 foster youth – and one out of every four is given psychotropic drugs. Those are drugs to fix their behavior, not to help a mental illness. And they’re known to have horrible side effects. 

Reporter Karen de Sa spoke with many foster children for the investigative series “Drugging our Kids.” She came by our studios earlier this week to talk about what she discovered.

Courtesy of blackgirlscode.com

Electrical engineer and computer programmer Kimberly Bryant says that when she was in college, she was one of only a few women, and the only black woman, in her graduating class. When she had her own daughter, Kai, she wondered what she could do to get more young girls of color into the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math-- known as STEM.

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