Hannah Kingsley-Ma

Line Producer and Reporter, KALW News

Hannah Kingsley-Ma is a reporter and producer living in San Francisco. 

Courtesy of the artist

Oakland-based singer/songwriter Madeline Kenney released her debut album, “Night Night at the First Landing," last year, and has since taken it on tour around the country. To support her music, she’s worked as a bread baker, a nanny, a piano teacher, and a volunteer at the Women's Audio Mission in San Francisco.

Nick Williams

 

In the gallery below his woodshop, master woodworker George Wurtzel has two portraits of himself on display.

Hannah Kingsley-Ma

 

This story originally aired in August of 2016. 

There’s a warehouse in San Francisco’s Bayview neighborhood stuffed with the severed legs of aging mannequins, screws of various sizes, and large pieces of real fur.

 

Hannah Kingsley-Ma

 

Oakland writer Chizu Omori and her family were among the near 120,000 Japanese Americans forced to leave their homes and relocate to incarceration camps during World War II. Omori was just 12 years old when she was sent to Poston, a camp in the desert of Arizona.

This is a story about one of my very first teachers, Janet Daijogo. She’s the one who taught me how to tie my shoes and how to read my first book. I’m just one of hundreds of kids who’ve passed through her kindergarten classroom in the more than fifty years she’s taught.  

Courtesy of Pui Ling Tam

This story originally aired in February of 2017

An estimated three million people worldwide took to the streets to participate in the Women’s March on January 21, 2017.

Courtesy of Summer Lee

 

Chinese migrants living in California in the late 1800s often arranged to have their bones sent back to their ancestral villages after death.

Hannah Kingsley-Ma

This week brings with it Día de los Muertos.

Ana Ruth Zamora, resized and recropped

 

At age nine, Javier Zamora left his grandparent’s home in El Salvador and made the treacherous journey across the U.S.-Mexico border by himself.

Hannah Kingsley-Ma

 

This auditory guessing game is part of Audiograph, a crowd-sourced collaborative radio project mapping the Bay Area’s sonic signature.

Audiograph tells the story of where you live, and the people who live there with you. Every Thursday, we tell you the story behind our weekly mystery sound on Crosscurrents, and here in weekly blog posts.

 

Audiograph's Sound of the Week: Warriors fans

May 18, 2017

This auditory guessing game is part of Audiograph, a crowd-sourced collaborative radio project mapping the Bay Area’s sonic signature.

Hannah Kingsley-Ma

Like a lot of middle schools, Bret Harte’s hallways carry with them the faint scent of Axe Body Spray and the sounds of kids shuffling to class. The school sits in the middle of Oakland, nestled below the big Mormon Temple. Outside, backpacks dangle from a tall, chain-link fence encircling a busy baseball diamond.

Hannah Kingsley-Ma

All week long, we've been playing this sound and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Hannah Kingsley-Ma

 

In a sun-filled classroom at an Oakland high school, a room full of adults are learning English.

Hannah Kingsley-Ma

 

Park Elementary School in Hayward is a cheerful place. The halls are dotted with murals of tiny green handprints and scribbled-on schoolwork, and the principal makes her rounds through the halls helping kids tie their shoes.

 


 

A gaggle of middle school girls are running around a soccer field in East Oakland. The scene is a blur of ponytails and mismatched cleats. Some of the girls wear a yellow chalky sunscreen in stripes across their face. It’s called thanaka, a powdered root that’s popular in Burma.

Hannah Kingsley-Ma

 

In 2014, media attention was white-hot on Central American children crossing the border alone. Though the headlines have since died down, the migration — and the gang warfare causing it — has not.

All week long, we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

The Book Report is a series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Today we hear about Katherine Dunn's Geek Love from Charlie Jane Anders, a writer living in San Francisco. Anders is the editor-in-chief of io9.com and runs the Writers with Drinks series. She's also the author of the novel All the Birds in the Sky.

Photo by James Hosking, resized and cropped with permission

All week long we've been playing one sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

The Point Reyes Light, a weekly newspaper in West Marin, is known for a lot of things. It won a Pulitzer Prize, it’s done muckraking reporting on a local cult, and riled up residents with its change in ownership. But these days, one of its most popular features is a police log that transforms people’s worries into something close to literature.

An excerpt from The Point Reyes Light Sheriff's Calls: An oak tree was reportedly dying, its debris crumbling into the roadway

"Great white shark - Cal Ripfin" by George Probst, CC license, resized and recropped

 


If you want to see great white sharks in the Bay Area, the best place to go is the Farallon Islands. It’s about a two hour boat ride from the Berkeley Marina. 27 miles offshore.

Hannah Kingsley-Ma

 

Two young trombone players are performing a duet inside a shipping container in a emptied lot in Hayes Valley. The musicians, Harry Gonzalez and Brett Wyatt, are from the San Francisco Symphony Youth Orchestra, and they address their audience through the screen in front of them. 

 

Two sisters, Kathryn Sibley and Madelyn Blair, walk into the Dragonfly Ink Studio to get a touch-up on their matching tattoos. You can sense their excitement—they’re not scared of the needle and they’re not scared of the pain.

Hannah Kingsley-Ma

This November’s ballot brings with it proposed legislation to battle the city’s affordable housing crisis -- but there’s also a proposition addressing the problem of rising commercial rents, too.

  For The Book Report we ask Bay Area writers to tell us about a book that’s meaningful for them. Today we hear from Oakland based author Mariko Tamaki, who is discussing Margaret Atwood's Cat's Eye. 

Alan Leggitt

When I first started working at The Booksmith, the local independent bookstore a couple blocks from my apartment, it was a lot like what I expected it to be. Book lovers browsed, regulars came in for their daily newspaper, and authors gave intimate readings. So it came as a surprise when one night all the shelves in the back were pushed aside, two hundred or so people filed in, and Baruch Porras-Hernandez welcomed the crowd enthusiastically with: “Are you guys ready for some porn? Let’s dive in!” 


Back in April, a 48 foot-long sperm whale was found on a beach in Pacifica called Mori Point. A lot of people had gathered around the whale to bear witness to its death. They inspected the animal’s internal organs, nervously poked its cracked flesh when no one was looking, and took a few selfies in the process. Mostly though? People want to know how this animal died - and if we had anything to do with it.

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

The Book Report is a series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Today we hear from Adam Johnson, a Pulitzer Prize-winning writer living in San Francisco, who is discussing Marlon James' A Brief History of Seven Killings. Johnson's latest collection of stories, Fortune Smileswas released August 18th. 

All week long, we've been playing this sound and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Pages