Lauren Schiller

Host, Inflection Point

 

Lauren Schiller is the creator and host of Inflection Point, a nationally syndicated weekly public radio show and podcast about how women rise up.

She comes by these conversations honestly: She was born into a long line of strong women role models who worked in business, arts, media, education and labor organizing. In the ’70s Lauren's mom took her to the march on Washington, D.C. in support of the Equal Rights Amendment. In the ’80s she was one of the first girls to join the Boys Club in Pittsburgh, PA (now Boys & Girls Club).

While getting her BA in Political Science from Vassar College, Lauren interned at a news radio station in Poughkeepsie reporting on local arts. After graduation a trip to Telluride, CO turned into a job at the Sheridan Opera House managing celebrities. She then went on to work for Chiat/Day New York, one of the world's most creative advertising agencies. Adopting their slogan “good enough is not enough” as her personal mantra, Lauren moved to the Bay Area and rose to the highest ranks of the industry to become the second female partner in her San Francisco ad firm. Lauren returned to her love of broadcasting when she created one of the first female-led podcasts in 2008, a show which ran for five years and was also syndicated on commercial radio and Comcast TV.

Lauren partnered with KALW to produce Inflection Point in 2015 and launched it during Women’s History Month. She created the program to share stories and insights we can apply to our own lives, and she created it for her daughters.

 

Ways to Connect

It seems like running a business and respecting the environment are at odds. Is it possible to do good for the planet and have a successful business? 

The Value of Diversity Pt. 1

Companies are now paying consultants to increase the diversity of their workforce, with an eye on innovation and the bottom line. But is that the only motivation businesses should be considering? /

The Value of Diversity Pt. 2

Companies are now paying consultants to increase the diversity of their workforce, with an eye on innovation and the bottom line. But is that the only motivation businesses should be considering? 

What is creative place-making? Plus, what it takes to become a judge--and run a courtroom. 

We've all heard about the "Bechdel Test" for women in film. But what needs to happen for women to reach parity with male directors, producers, writers and actors? 

Photo by Victoria Stevens

Dubbed the “Queen of the Indies,” Parker Posey has appeared in nearly 90 films and television productions, 

Technology is advancing so quickly--are humans becoming obsolete? Or are humans still at the center of solutions? We'll meet Leah Hunter of Fast Company, who is writing a book about the future, and Patrice Martin, Co-Lead and Creative Director of IDEO.org. She helps non-profits come up with human-centered design solutions. Designing the future. For humans. That's our Inflection Point. 

What we eat in America is largely driven by the big food companies' ability to churn it out fast and cheap--and it's leading to toxic environments and a precipitous climb in sugar consumption.  On this episode of Inflection Point, we meet two women whose personal experiences led them to start food companies meant to transform the way we eat and drink.

Anya Fernald started BelCampo Meat to raise the quality and locality of the meat we eat, and Kara Goldin started Hint Water to replace 'sugar-free' beverages and encourage more water consumption.
 

Title IX was passed in 1972 to ensure that all girls have equal access to sports. So why are sports so important to girls? This episode, we talk with Brandi Chastain of World Cup fame--not just because she kicked the winning goal and liberated women to sport their sports bras, but because she inspired thousands of girls to play soccer. And we talk with the CEO and Founder of Title Nine clothing, Missy Park, about how sports can affect outcomes for girls in life and in business. The power of sports for girls. That's our Inflection Point.  

Remember the days of shopping all weekend at the mall, going from store to store to store--maybe even this past weekend? One of our guests this week says that shopping has always been incredibly inefficient. But what are the alternatives--you can't possibly buy everything online...or can you?  Find out when we talk with Mariam Naficy, Founder and CEO of Minted.com, a marketplace of independent artists that crowd sources its products.

Human trafficking is estimated to be in the millions--yet only a fraction of it is reported. We talk to Hediana Utarti of Asian Women's Shelter in San Francisco, which helps immigrants--including LGBT and human trafficking victims--to get out of abusive situations.

We all know the stereotypes, but the traditional family roles have shifted. Almost half of women are now the primary breadwinners for their households. On this episode, find out how women--and men--and moms and dads, are handling this tectonic change both at home and financially. We'll talk to Izzy Chan, director of The Big Flip and Laura Pilz of Merrill Lynch.

"Can't a girl get a break" 71% of fortune 500 companies provide mentorship programs that help women get ahead--but are they done well?  And more and more women own their own business, but they still lack confidence. We talk to Lauren Mosenthal and Eileen Carey, the founders of Glassbreakers, a peer-to-peer mentoring site; and to Sharon Miller, the CEO of Renaissance Entrepreneurship Center.

Climate change--one view is doom and gloom and destruction. The other is that things could be far more beautiful and regenerative and sustainable and socially just than we can imagine. Is climate change an inevitability or an opportunity? Our guests are Shana Rappaport and Amanda Ravenhill of Project Drawdown, and Julia Prochnik, consultant to the National Resource Defense Council.

Women negotiating climate change. That's our inflection point.  

  There are billions of people across the world who are living in poverty.  And it's not uncommon for girls for in developing countries to be married off or working by the time they reach the 5th grade. But if you keep a girl in school, her income opportunities grow by 15% for each year she does stay in school. Meet the new social entrepreneurs, Leila Janah of SamaGroup and Erin Ganju of Room to Read. Breaking the cycle of poverty for millions of women. That's our next Inflection Point.

What does it take for women to succeed in the restaurant business in the San Francisco Bay Area, one of the most competitive restaurant markets in the country? In a $683 billion industry across the US, less than 5% of restaurant owners and chefs are women.

Meet Tanya Holland of Brown Sugar Kitchen in Oakland, CA and Ann Wheat of Millennium Restaurant in San Francisco--named the number one vegan restaurant in the world. The grit required of women to succeed in the restaurant business.

That's our inflection point.

Transportation and weddings are both multi-billion dollar industries--and if you're a business person, that means opportunity for reinvention. From the way we buy for our weddings, to the way we get from here to there, women are coming up with new ways to connect us to the things and services we want.

On this episode of Inflection Point, we talk with Kira Wampler of Lyft and Ilana Stern of Weddington Way.

Women driving the new economy. That's our inflection point.  


It's been reported many times that the technology industry is dominated by men. In fact, only 1 in 4 tech workers are women. Women hold only 9% of management positions, and account for only 14 percent of senior management positions at Silicon Valley startups. In this episode, we talk with two women who not only work in tech, but are leaders in the field. CNET.com Editor-in-Chief Lindsey Turrentine and Flickr Co-Founder and entrepreneur Caterina Fake

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