Leila Day

Reporter & Editor

Leila Day is a reporter and editor at KALW, with a current focus on healthcare. Day is also a mentor for KALW's Audio Academy and the project manager for the San Quentin Prison Report. She holds a degree in anthropology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and studied audio production at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies.

She's produced work for AARP, NPR, USA TODAY and other national outlets. In 2015 she was awarded "Best Commentary" from the Society of Professional Journalists, Norcal, and was also a reporting fellow for USC Annenberg's Center for Health Reporting.

Before radio life, she spent 4 years in Havana, Cuba where she developed a dance intensive program and was a frequent contributor to Cuba's national newspaper, Juventud Rebelde.

 

Today at the San Jose City College campus, hundreds of people have shown to up go through a series of steps to get them closer to becoming  U.S. Citizens.

Six years ago, today, the Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as "Obama Care," was signed into law. The goal was to make health care accessible to all Americans, and to eliminate disparities based on income, education, gender and race. 

 

Belinda Reyes, director of the Cesar E. Chavez Institute at San Francisco State University, discusses the changing Mission and some of the difficulties that Latino immigrants may face when it comes to resettling in the U.S.   

Leila Day

Concepción Caballero Antonio is chopping squash in the kitchen of Los Yaquis Salvadorian and Mexican Restaurant. The massive knife she’s using is about the same size as her arm. She’s very small, and grins a lot.

Leila Day

 

Concepción Caballero Antonio is sitting at a table at the Mission Neighborhood Health Center, listening to one of her compañeras sing.

 

Alyssa Kapnik Portraiture

    

 


We are always adjusting the way we sound. It especially depends on the social situation we are in. Linguists call it "code switching," a term originally used for people who would switch between two different languages like Spanish and English.

For some people, getting dressed in the morning isn’t about just throwing on what’s in reach, or clean. For others, it’s more of a ritual with attention to the finest detail and a commitment not to leave the house in nothing but their finest.  

Leila Day

In the past few months, one particular issue has become a flashpoint around gentrification in Oakland: noise.  

Naotake Murayama

It’s not every day that a local person becomes a saint, but on September 23rd, more than two hundred years after he died, Junípero Serra will be canonized by Pope Francis. Serra was an 18th century Franciscan priest whose name can be seen on roads, schools and landmarks all over California. He’s a huge figure in the state, but some people believe Serra is far from being a saint.

This past year, Native American activists in various parts of California have held protests against the Pope’s plans to canonize Junípero Serra.

Alyssa Kapnik Samuel

In many African American communities, mental health issues have a history of being undertreated and underdiagnosed. According to the federal government’s Office of Minority Health, African Americans are 20% more likely to experience serious mental health problems than the general population, but less likely to seek treatment.

This is part three of a three-part series addressing mental health care within black communities.

Hands are clapping, children are bobbing their heads and most of the elders are wearing their finest hats and polished shoes at the New Revelation Community Church. Reverend Donna Allen leads a sermon.

“And this notion of law enforcement interacting with people with lethal force? Jesus would cry out, ‘I am the Prince of Peace and I tell you, no justice, no peace, no justice!’”

Alyssa Kapnik Samuel


In many African American communities, mental health issues have a history of being undertreated and underdiagnosed. According to the federal government’s Office of Minority Health, African Americans are 20% more likely to experience serious mental health problems than the general population, but less likely to seek treatment.

This is part two of a three-part series addressing mental health care within black communities.

“When I look back on my life and I look at the things that I did, they were always people-centered,” says Cedric Jackson. He’s training to become a clinical psychologist, and says it’s something that’s always appealed to him.

Alyssa Kapnik Samuel

  

In many African-American communities, mental health issues have a history of being undertreated and underdiagnosed. According to the federal government’s Office of Minority Health, African-Americans are 20% more likely to experience serious mental health problems than the general population, but less likely to seek treatment.

 

This is part one of a three-part series addressing mental health care within black communities.

Violinist Danielle Taylor is tall, in her late 20s, with a shaved head and a beanie cap propped to the side. She smiles a lot and upon meeting her for the first time, my instinct is to give her a hug instead of a handshake. When she picks up her violin for an impromptu song, she shifts into a deep calm.

Alyssa Kapnik Samuel

In many African-American communities, mental health issues have a history of being under-treated and under-diagnosed.

According to the federal government's Office of Minority Health, African-Americans are 20% more likely to experience serious mental health problems than the general population – but for a number of reasons, including lack of access and limited insurance options – they're less likely to seek treatment. But there's also something less concrete: there's a stigma attached to needing mental health care in the first place.

Leila Day

Traver Riggins is playing with her toddler Charlie at home in Oakland. Riggins works as a server at a restaurant on the weekends and during the week she takes care of her daughter. She’s also a recently-trained doula.

When it comes to giving birth, the complications for women of color are unusually high. And why is that?

MONICA MCLEMORE: That statistic is true. Black women are four times more likely to die in childbirth when compared to white women. 


In 2011, about 82 percent of San Francisco’s students graduated from high school. Ten percent dropped out. Break it down by ethnic group and the numbers change in uncomfortable ways. For example, just 62.3 percent of the city’s African-American students graduated, and nearly 20 percent dropped out. The numbers for Latino students are similar. Kids need education and support, but resources are increasingly scarce. Often in these cases, in cities like San Francisco, nonprofits step in. Resources for those organizations are limited, too, but it helps to be able to show pretty much constant success.

Alexis Keenan

Art often shines  a light on bigger issues in neighborhoods, in our society, and in our personal lives. Local playwright, Echo Brown explores identity, empowerment, race, gender and Beyonce, in her new play "Black Virgins are not for Hipsters." 

"The whole play is me revealing myself in these intimate ways"-Echo Brown 

 

Click the audio player above to hear the entire interview. 

Buffalo Soldiers ride on

May 18, 2015
Leila Day


Witching to find water

May 12, 2015

The lack of rain has forced California farmers and wine makers to turn from the sky to the ground to find water. It’s down there, but you have to know exactly where it is in order to drill a well.  

There are a couple of options for how to do this: you can have a geologist use mapping and scientific data to get a lay of the land; or you can can hire a water witch. These are people who search for water using two thin sticks or iron rods that they say cross each other when there’s water  under the earth.

http://louisearonson.com

We're all getting older, so what are some ways we can embrace it better? When women hit major markers with aging, like menopause, Dr. Louise Aronson, a geriatrician and professor at UCSF, says that there is no reason to get so down about it.

Education is considered a way out of the prison system and poverty. Yet ironically, for some people education is more attainable from behind bars. Inside San Bruno Jail #5 is the Five Keys Charter school. It’s one of the nation’s first high schools within a jail, and the subject of a documentary now in production called "The Corridor."  KALW's Leila Day sat down with filmmakers Annelise Wunderlich and Richard O'Connell to learn more.

RICHARD O'CONNELL: It’s like a domino effect. Suddenly you have a different experience. And you experience that you can actually do things and get things done, and there’s hope. 

To hear the full interview, please click on the audio link above.

To learn more about the fundraising for the project click the link for their Kickstarter campaign : http://www.thecorridordocumentary.com/

Tom Levy

  Some people who take dance classes regularly have a saying: “Dance is my church.”

Dancer Stella Adelman says just that about going to Afro-Cuban folkloric dance class. “There’s a release to it,” she says. To her, it’s a place where she can reflect and find some clarity through movement. To some practitioners this clarity comes from being active and getting exercise, for others, it’s literally a spiritual practice.  

The Bay Area is home to many instructors of Afro-Cuban rhythms. Music and dance lovers come from all over the world to participate in workshops taught by some of the most loved teachers and dancers from the Cuban Diaspora. Many of them have found home here.

The Buffalo Soldiers were some of our country’s first park rangers. They proudly wore their uniforms with wide brimmed ranger hats and navy blue jackets adorned with gold stripes.  Just after the Civil War, the US government formed these regiments of black soldiers to patrol and protect nationally designated park land, claimed after the Indian Wars. And their journey started right here in the Bay Area where the Buffalo Soldiers gathered in San Francisco’s Presidio before heading into the mountains of Yosemite and beyond.

Alex Handy

Lots of people talk about how addicted we are to our screens. We spend our days staring at smartphones, tablets, and computers. But the first digital addiction came before most of us even imagined a home computer: video games. 

Sara Brooke Curtis

Every place has a history hidden that lives beneath what you can see on the surface. Just take the Mission District. The Bart Station at 24th street and Mission is called Plaza Sandino by some -- because in the 1980’s Pro-Sandanista protesters would rally there. Right down the street, Potrero del Sol Park is better known to those who grew up here as La Raza park -- back in the 70’s it was a major gathering spot for low rider cars. This neighborhood has also been called the birthplace of Latin Rock.

Tomorrow, voters in two key cities in the Bay Area will weigh in on measures to increase their minimum wage.  Both Oakland and San Francisco have propositions on the ballot that would increase their minimum wage to $12.25 per hour.

http://www.courtneyruby.com/meet-courtney/

Courtney Ruby is Oakland's City Auditor who now wants to be Oakland's next mayor. Ruby says her priority is public safety and since she has experience  crunching the numbers she's convinced that she can find the funds to add at least 200 more police officers on the street.  Not just any kind of officer, Ruby's rallying for more engaged officers and says she's not afraid to take a stand on tough issues.

In the past Ruby has taken on City Hall and forced the city to refund millions in overpaid parking tickets. She's known for questioning shady contracts and exposing what she calls "a broken system."

The Fog Harvester

Sep 17, 2014
Leila Day

John Lovell is holding onto a rope, easing himself down a steep drop-off.

“I’ve already fallen off it once!” Lovell yells, looking down a steep canyon called Avalon in Daly City. It’s a gusty place, with planes constantly overhead. Lovell is here to check on his harvest.    

“People ask me what I do, and I say, ‘[I] harvest fog,’ they say, ‘Harvest frogs?’” Lovell laughs.

Human trafficking is the second most profitable criminal enterprise in the world. It's estimated to rake in $32 billion per year after drug trafficking. San Francisco is one of the nation’s trafficking centers.

Leila Day

 

If you walk upstairs from the kitchen at Mother Brown’s drop-in center in the evening, you’ll find dozens of people sleeping in chairs. During the day, Mother Brown’s serves home-cooked meals to the homeless in San Francisco’s Bayview district. There are over a thousand people without homes in Bayview -- the second-highest homeless population in the city. But there’s not one shelter. So for more than a decade, Mother Brown’s has been offering chairs. Now they want to offer beds.

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