Leila Day

Reporter & Editor

Leila Day is a reporter and editor at KALW, with a current focus on healthcare. Day is also a mentor for KALW's Audio Academy and the project manager for the San Quentin Prison Report. She holds a degree in anthropology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and studied audio production at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies.

She's produced work for AARP, NPR, USA TODAY and other national outlets. In 2015 she was awarded "Best Commentary" from the Society of Professional Journalists, Norcal, and was also a reporting fellow for USC Annenberg's Center for Health Reporting.

Before radio life, she spent 4 years in Havana, Cuba where she developed a dance intensive program and was a frequent contributor to Cuba's national newspaper, Juventud Rebelde.

Image courtesy of Creative Commons

Shelton Johnson brings the hidden history of Blacks in the American West to life through a storytelling project at Yosemite National Park. In his performance, he channels that past, and transforms into the fictional role of Buffalo Soldier Elizy Bowman. And, as a note for our listeners, this story contains some racially-charged language.

Photo courtesy of Marc Mondavi

Five years of drought has forced California farmers and wine makers to turn from the sky to the ground to find water. It’s down there, but you have to know exactly where it is in order to drill a well.  

photo courtesy of San Francisco International Airport

San Francisco International Airport is built on dozens of acres of wetlands, and it’s home to many species of birds. Unfortunately for those birds, it's also home to many, many airplanes. That means it’s someone’s job to  keep these flying creatures and flying objects out of each other’s way. 

 

On the back porch of Mr. Lucky’s restaurant in Pleasant Hill about 12 people have ordered drinks and are eating chicken fingers and onion rings with ranch dressing.

Ladies in line

May 18, 2016
PERNILLA PERSSON. Cropped and resized

The Dr. George W. Davis Senior Center is the only building on the block where there is constant activity. Laughter pours out of the cafeteria, which for now has been turned into a dance floor. 

Leila Day

In some churches when the music starts, so does the praise dancing.

Dancers stand near the choir or the pulpit and perform choreographed routines that mix ballet, modern, and jazz. They are often young girls, who practice every movement and their focus is to praise.

Courtesy Evangelist Alveda King

This week we’ve been bringing you stories from the families of revolutionaries. And we conclude this series with Alveda King, the niece of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

The name Angela Davis is synonymous with revolution. But her niece, Eisa Davis, didn't learn that until later in life. "I did know that my aunt was a public figure of some kind," says Eisa Davis. "And I did know that my mom had done everything she could to save her sister’s life."

Bob Hsiang

 

Yuri Kochiyama was known as one of the most fearless activists of her time. She was the daughter of Japanese immigrants, and spent time in an internment camp in the 1940’s.

"cesar chavez (detail)" by flickr user mario. Used under CC BY 2.0 / cropped and resized.

 

Cesar Chavez is remembered for leading the struggle to reform labor laws for exploited workers. The United Farm Workers Movement grabbed the attention of the world as Chavez organized nonviolent protests, grape boycotts, hunger strikes and marches throughout California — ultimately leading to many improvements for farm workers.

 

Today at the San Jose City College campus, hundreds of people have shown to up go through a series of steps to get them closer to becoming  U.S. Citizens.

Six years ago, today, the Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as "Obama Care," was signed into law. The goal was to make health care accessible to all Americans, and to eliminate disparities based on income, education, gender and race. 

 

Belinda Reyes, director of the Cesar E. Chavez Institute at San Francisco State University, discusses the changing Mission and some of the difficulties that Latino immigrants may face when it comes to resettling in the U.S.   

Leila Day

Concepción Caballero Antonio is chopping squash in the kitchen of Los Yaquis Salvadorian and Mexican Restaurant. The massive knife she’s using is about the same size as her arm. She’s very small, and grins a lot.

Leila Day

 

Concepción Caballero Antonio is sitting at a table at the Mission Neighborhood Health Center, listening to one of her compañeras sing.

 

Alyssa Kapnik Portraiture

    

 


We are always adjusting the way we sound. It especially depends on the social situation we are in. Linguists call it "code switching," a term originally used for people who would switch between two different languages like Spanish and English.

For some people, getting dressed in the morning isn’t about just throwing on what’s in reach, or clean. For others, it’s more of a ritual with attention to the finest detail and a commitment not to leave the house in nothing but their finest.  

Leila Day

In the past few months, one particular issue has become a flashpoint around gentrification in Oakland: noise.  

Naotake Murayama

It’s not every day that a local person becomes a saint, but on September 23rd, more than two hundred years after he died, Junípero Serra will be canonized by Pope Francis. Serra was an 18th century Franciscan priest whose name can be seen on roads, schools and landmarks all over California. He’s a huge figure in the state, but some people believe Serra is far from being a saint.

This past year, Native American activists in various parts of California have held protests against the Pope’s plans to canonize Junípero Serra.

Alyssa Kapnik Samuel

In many African American communities, mental health issues have a history of being undertreated and underdiagnosed. According to the federal government’s Office of Minority Health, African Americans are 20% more likely to experience serious mental health problems than the general population, but less likely to seek treatment.

This is part three of a three-part series addressing mental health care within black communities.

Hands are clapping, children are bobbing their heads and most of the elders are wearing their finest hats and polished shoes at the New Revelation Community Church. Reverend Donna Allen leads a sermon.

“And this notion of law enforcement interacting with people with lethal force? Jesus would cry out, ‘I am the Prince of Peace and I tell you, no justice, no peace, no justice!’”

Alyssa Kapnik Samuel


In many African American communities, mental health issues have a history of being undertreated and underdiagnosed. According to the federal government’s Office of Minority Health, African Americans are 20% more likely to experience serious mental health problems than the general population, but less likely to seek treatment.

This is part two of a three-part series addressing mental health care within black communities.

“When I look back on my life and I look at the things that I did, they were always people-centered,” says Cedric Jackson. He’s training to become a clinical psychologist, and says it’s something that’s always appealed to him.

Alyssa Kapnik Samuel

  

In many African-American communities, mental health issues have a history of being undertreated and underdiagnosed. According to the federal government’s Office of Minority Health, African-Americans are 20% more likely to experience serious mental health problems than the general population, but less likely to seek treatment.

 

This is part one of a three-part series addressing mental health care within black communities.

Violinist Danielle Taylor is tall, in her late 20s, with a shaved head and a beanie cap propped to the side. She smiles a lot and upon meeting her for the first time, my instinct is to give her a hug instead of a handshake. When she picks up her violin for an impromptu song, she shifts into a deep calm.

Alyssa Kapnik Samuel

In many African-American communities, mental health issues have a history of being under-treated and under-diagnosed.

According to the federal government's Office of Minority Health, African-Americans are 20% more likely to experience serious mental health problems than the general population – but for a number of reasons, including lack of access and limited insurance options – they're less likely to seek treatment. But there's also something less concrete: there's a stigma attached to needing mental health care in the first place.

Leila Day

Traver Riggins is playing with her toddler Charlie at home in Oakland. Riggins works as a server at a restaurant on the weekends and during the week she takes care of her daughter. She’s also a recently-trained doula.

When it comes to giving birth, the complications for women of color are unusually high. And why is that?

MONICA MCLEMORE: That statistic is true. Black women are four times more likely to die in childbirth when compared to white women. 


In 2011, about 82 percent of San Francisco’s students graduated from high school. Ten percent dropped out. Break it down by ethnic group and the numbers change in uncomfortable ways. For example, just 62.3 percent of the city’s African-American students graduated, and nearly 20 percent dropped out. The numbers for Latino students are similar. Kids need education and support, but resources are increasingly scarce. Often in these cases, in cities like San Francisco, nonprofits step in. Resources for those organizations are limited, too, but it helps to be able to show pretty much constant success.

Alexis Keenan

Art often shines  a light on bigger issues in neighborhoods, in our society, and in our personal lives. Local playwright, Echo Brown explores identity, empowerment, race, gender and Beyonce, in her new play "Black Virgins are not for Hipsters." 

"The whole play is me revealing myself in these intimate ways"-Echo Brown 

 

Click the audio player above to hear the entire interview. 

Buffalo Soldiers ride on

May 18, 2015
Leila Day


http://louisearonson.com

We're all getting older, so what are some ways we can embrace it better? When women hit major markers with aging, like menopause, Dr. Louise Aronson, a geriatrician and professor at UCSF, says that there is no reason to get so down about it.

Education is considered a way out of the prison system and poverty. Yet ironically, for some people education is more attainable from behind bars. Inside San Bruno Jail #5 is the Five Keys Charter school. It’s one of the nation’s first high schools within a jail, and the subject of a documentary now in production called "The Corridor."  KALW's Leila Day sat down with filmmakers Annelise Wunderlich and Richard O'Connell to learn more.

RICHARD O'CONNELL: It’s like a domino effect. Suddenly you have a different experience. And you experience that you can actually do things and get things done, and there’s hope. 

To hear the full interview, please click on the audio link above.

To learn more about the fundraising for the project click the link for their Kickstarter campaign : http://www.thecorridordocumentary.com/

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