Leila Day

Reporter/Producer

Leila Day is a staff reporter and producer at KALW, with a current focus on criminal justice and healthcare reporting.  She has a degree in anthropology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and studied radio at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies. She's produced work for AARP, NPR and was awarded the 2015 USC Annenberg Fellowship for Reporting on Health. Before radio life, Leila spent 4 years in Havana, Cuba where she developed a dance intensive program and was a frequent contributor to Cuba's national newspaper, Juventud Rebelde.

Tina Hayes School of Etiquette Class

California has been in an ongoing struggle trying to figure out how to deal with overcrowding in prisons. The problems extend to the Division of Juvenile Justice, where the state’s most serious young offenders are held. For youth from Alameda County, being sent to one of the DJJ facilities is one of the worst alternatives. They’re spread out all over the state, which means it can be hard to keep family connections, and complaints of abuse and unsafe conditions have dogged the system for more than a decade.

Rumba and the radio

Sep 18, 2013
Leila Day


Hog Island Oyster Company

 

All week long we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Sara Brooke Curtis

When people get into trouble with the law, they normally don’t have a chance to have a conversation with their victims. To explain what happened. Hear about the damage they caused. Say they’re sorry. But there’s a growing trend to try and make that happen, so both parties can move on.

Thingamajigs

Solvitur Ambulando is the name of the performance piece that’s part of an artist in residency program at the Berkeley Arts Museum and Pacific Film Archive.

“It translates into it ‘is solved by walking,’” says Edward Schocker, a musician and collaborator in the group. “Just constantly moving because they have to move because of political situation or adoption or because of their choosing.”

Libraries are where many people go to exercise their brains, and now there’s at least one where you can exercise your body. The 81st Avenue Branch Library in East Oakland is finding that what people want in their neighborhood is to work out. And, they didn’t have to go far to find the right instructor.

Under CC license from Flickr.

Lots of people have seen — and heard — the wild parrots of Telegraph Hill. They have a distinct sound to them, with one native San Franciscan describing it as a thousand screaming babies. KALW's Leila Day tracked some down last spring. Take a listen:

When we think of policing, we don’t always think about psychology. One is academic; the other, relentlessly real-world. But many police departments, including San Francisco’s, assign patrols based on a psychological theory: The Broken Windows Theory.

The older we get, the harder it is to think of ourselves as “old.” But as far as the government is concerned – specifically, the federal corrections system – you’re “aging” or “elderly” once you turn 50. California houses one of the country’s biggest populations of elderly prisoners. And gradually, it also releases them.

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