Liz Mak

Reporter and Line Producer, KALW News

Liz is a writer and radio & multimedia producer. She joined KALW in 2013 and served as a reporter and producer at "Crosscurrents."  Liz also co-produces the series "The Cutaway," which ventures into subcultures around the Bay Area.

Her work has also appeared in The New York Times, NPR, KQED, and BBC, among others. You can find more at lizmak.com.

 

Ways to Connect

Photo by Liz Mak

All week long, we've been playing this sound and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

"UF McCarty Desks Classroom" by Flickr user Christopher Sessums. Used under CC BY 2.0 / resized and cropped

 

The commercial sexual exploitation of children, or CSEC, can mean a lot of things including forced prostitution, pornography or the sex trafficking of minors.

 

 

U.C. Berkeley is known for its world-class scientists, in disciplines like physics, chemistry or biology. 

Liz Mak

 

All week long, we've been playing this sound and asking you to guess what it is and where in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Liz Mak

 

Ever seen those huge billboards above the 101 Freeway, advertising for the HempCon or this weekend’s Emerald Cup in Sonoma, and wondered what these marijuana festivals and competitions are all about?

Liz Mak

 


Lin-Lin Tsou-Otani is a real estate agent with DeLeon Realty. It’s Saturday morning, and our housing search starts in Cupertino, in a van filled with about 10 other people.

Art mirrors life in rapper turned cop’s one man show

Sep 14, 2015
Jim Dennis

Cops and Robbers” is a one-man play now showing at the Marsh Theater in Berkeley. It’s an emotionally-charged piece that delves into the details of a fictitious officer-involved shooting in Oakland. In it, you’ll find a variety of characters -- including a pimp, a police officer, a conservative radio host, and a news reporter -- all with their own perspectives and prejudices.

WEB EXCLUSIVE: Extended Interview with Jinho Ferreira

Sep 14, 2015
Jim Dennis

Cops and Robbers” is a one-man play now showing at the Marsh Theater in Berkeley. It’s an emotionally-charged piece that delves into the details of a fictitious officer-involved shooting in Oakland. In it, you’ll find a variety of characters -- including a pimp, a police officer, a conservative radio host, and a news reporter -- all with their own perspectives and prejudices.

Liz Mak

Nurse Arzelia Lopez is heading to her next work appointment in East Oakland.

Her client, Jasmine Jurado, is 19 years old. She has a toddler, who’s 14 months old. It’s been Lopez’s job, since Jurado was pregnant, to provide her with parenting support, both emotional and medical.

Liz Mak

Last night, the Golden State Warriors reclaimed the NBA Championship title for the first time in 40 years. Impromptu celebrations broke out in the streets. KALW sent reporters out into Oakland and San Francisco to talk to the local team's die-hard fans. 

Kevin Jones

 

Around 20 teenagers are settling into a classroom at this year’s Bayview Youth Summit. After a few minutes, they’re quiet, eyes focused on someone their own age, who’s leading a Race and Racism workshop.

“This is like an example of how African Americans are portrayed in the media,” says a youth moderator. “Even in Disney.”

Liz Mak

All week long, we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Jeremy Dalmas

All week long, we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

This auditory guessing game is part of Audiograph, a crowd-sourced collaborative radio project mapping the Bay Area’s sonic signature. Audiograph tells the story of where you live, and the people who live there with you. Every Thursday, we tell you the story behind our weekly mystery sound on Crosscurrents, and here in weekly blog posts.

Listen above for the full answer...

Anna Vignet

Ambessa Cantave and I are taking a walk in West Oakland, looking for an old music venue he used to go to. He’s having some trouble finding the place.

“Let’s go down one more block,” he says. “I think … it’s one of these things.”

The building we stop in front of used to be a dairy creamery, before it got converted to a warehouse music venue called the WC.

“It was pretty abandoned,” Cantave says. “It seemed like a great place for partying.”

flickr user Jeremy Brooks

 

In one of America's most expensive cities, there's a fringe political party whose name sums up their concerns: The Rent is Too Damn High. That city is New York – but in San Francisco rents are even higher. And while no party around here has been quite so blunt about it, organizations are taking action.

The Bay Area Council Economic Institute hosted a housing forum earlier this year, and the conversation showed there are many ways to look at the problem – and many ways to disagree on how to solve it.

 

It’s a Saturday night, and I’m standing just across from the UC Berkeley campus on Piedmont Avenue, Berkeley’s fraternity row. Young women like Trixie Scolari and Tara Harmon wander past: The two are deciding whether or not to go to a fraternity party that evening. I ask them if they feel safe when they go to these parties.

“I do!” says Scolari. “It’s your attitude...I go in and we’re really careful.”

Harmon says, “In general, I think we’re both pretty smart. And if we are drinking, we’re watching our drinks, and not drinking too much.”

Sasha Wizansky

Imagine this for a moment: What if everything about today was curated just for you? Who you meet, what you see, even how you feel? Everything, including this story (with eye-catching phrases written just for you).

That’s the same approach taken by Odyssey Works, a group of artists based in San Francisco and New York. They make long-form, immersive theater productions that can last anywhere from eight hours to several months -- and they do it all for an audience of one.

Liz Mak

All week long we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Liz Mak

 

Sexual assault on college campuses is a topic that's difficult to escape right now. That's partly because earlier this year, the Department of Education released a list of 55 college campuses facing investigation for failing to take sexual assault reports seriously.

 

Oliver Jacobson started playing violin when he was six years old. At 18, he enrolled at Berklee College of Music, one of the top music schools in the country. Back then, he wanted to be a star. But he had a sense he might be able to use his talent for something more.

“I was in the practice rooms for four hours a day,” he says, “trying to be the best jazz violinist I could be, and just feeling kind of hollow in that.”

Visualization courtesy of SF Recreation and Park Department

If you live in the neighborhood, Huntington Park in San Francisco’s Nob Hill, it's a great place to relax, read a book, or, as Haris Butt says, bring your dog to Friday nights’ “Yappy Hour.”

“80 percent of the people I know in my neighborhood, I've met through this park,” says Butt. “I know more dogs than I know people’s names, actually.”

Flickr user andersdenkend

The shooting at Seattle Pacific University marks the latest gun-related tragedy in the U.S. It follows the attacks in Isla Vista at UC Santa Barbara. The country is talking about whether or not to require treatment for the severely mentally ill. In California, this has been an ongoing conversation, ever since the creation of Laura’s Law.

Liz Mak

 

San Francisco currently has the third lowest unemployment rate of all California's counties. But while that’s good news, it doesn't mean that much if you’re one of the more than 23,000 San Franciscans still finding it difficult to get work.

Liz Mak / KALW

 

Jeremy Mykaels is in his early 60s, and he has AIDS. As a young gay man, he moved to the Castro, where he has lived for almost 40 years. He's been in his Victorian apartment on Noe Street for about half of that time -- but he may not be living here much longer.